"Faridi anawasha jiko."

Translation:Faridi lights the stove.

March 8, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelMcF

"Faridi turns the stove on" is wrong but "Faridi turns on the stove" is right??

April 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/pablopublico

The former was just a minute ago considered correct.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RockTombeuse32

Soooo jiko? Kitchen, stove, huh?

March 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName

Lots of languages use one word for "kitchen" and "cuisine" (eg. German and French) and I fail to see how that is any less confusing ... languages all divide up semantic space differently and people cope with a lot of ambiguity with context. Some words even simultaneously mean two opposite things, like "wicked" or "sick". People also come up with ways to disambiguate in situations where context is not enough.

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/juryrigging

Both are places where you cook food. Also means fireplace. Instead of adding new words for the progression of fireplace --> stove --> kitchen, perhaps they just tacked new meanings onto old words?

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LesOConnel

I have seen jiko translated as stove and jikoni used for kitchen. Not sure what is correct.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/danielmokmad

Jiko means stove or kitchen. "Jikoni" will mean "to the kitchen", "in the kitchen" or "to the stove".

So, "ninapika jikoni" means "I am cooking in the kitchen", "ninapika jiko" means "I am cooking the kitchen"

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SirBeck

I believe the 'ni' is added to indicate location. Not sure though.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ElDoctr

"Jikoni", the place of the jiko/stove, is the proper way to say kitchen.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SirBeck

Why is 'Faridi lights the kitchen' not accepted? He could, for example, turn on the switch in the kitchen to ''light'' the kitchen, or would you say that differently?

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/danielmokmad

Good question. Kuwasha can be used either 1) with a fire/something that burns or 2) with a light source. So, Faridi can turn on the lights in the kitchen ("kuwasha taa jikoni"), but he can't turn on the kitchen itself.

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SirBeck

Asante! :) I understand now.

What if he actually lit the kitchen on fire? How would you say that?

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/danielmokmad

That's a good question. I would say "aliwasha moto jikoni", but that would be much more likely to be interpreted as "he lit a fire in the stove". For clarification, I might add "chumba kinaungua", to signify "the room is burning". Maybe someone else has a more compact way to say that?

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SirBeck

Thanks! It's ok hopefully I won't need to use this sentence anyway :)

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ElbietaKos6

So Faridi is he :) I always have a woman in mind

January 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/nehrmann84

I tried oven and got it wrong. Is this a translation error (for Duo), or is there a separate word for oven as distinct from stove?

Thanks

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/pablopublico

Can somebody explain why jiko appears to have two different plurals: majiko and meko? Do they mean the same thing? Is it a regional variation? Thanks a lot!

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Dealanach

Does it really matter if you say a stove instead of the stove?

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MuziraRobert

Why call the kitchen and stove "Jiko"

November 11, 2018
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