https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot

What are some of your favorite names from other countries/languages and their meanings?

I'm just wondering what kind of names everyone likes. Here are some of my favorite ones that come from, or are used in, languages I am learning:

  • Eirwen (feminine, Welsh). It means "white snow" or "blessed snow".
  • Enfys (masculine, Welsh). It means "rainbow".
  • Blodwen (feminine, Welsh). It means "white flowers"
  • Clara (feminine, Spanish/Italian). It means "bright" or "clear". The masculine name is Clarus, from Latin.
  • Rosalia (feminine, Spanish). From the Spanish word for "rose".
  • Anders (masculine, Swedish). From the name Andrew, which means "manly".
  • Frida (feminine, Swedish). It's from the old Germanic word "frid", meaning "peace".
  • Ivar/Ivor (masculine, Swedish/Welsh). From Old Norse Ívarr, meaning "yew warrior" or "bow warrior". (yew is a kind of tree)
  • Nia (feminine, Swahili). It means "purpose".
  • Imani (gender-neutral, Swahili). It means "faith", borrowed from Arabic.
  • Halima (feminine, Arabic). It means "patient". The masculine version is Halim.
  • Safi (masculine, Arabic). It means "pure".
  • Zaynab (feminine, Arabic). This is the name of a flowering tree, possibly from the word "beautiful".
  • Haneul (gender-neutral, Korean). It can mean "heaven" or "sky".
  • Sophia (feminine, Greek). It means "wisdom".

If you would like to learn some common (or rare!) names used in other languages, check out this website! http://www.behindthename.com/

March 9, 2017

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/S0R0USH

Not to sound narcissistic, but my name:

It means "voice of heaven" or "heavenly message" in Persian. :)

March 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageLover.

That's a great meaning!

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487

Some names off the top of my head,

  • Ciara /ki(e)ra/ in Irish, girls' name, presumably meaning "little dark one", I can confirm "ciar" means "dark".
  • Aisling /a(i)shling/ in Irish, girls' name, meaning "vision" or "daydream".
  • Aoife /eefa/ in Irish, girls' name, not very sure about the meaning, I like the way it sounds!
  • Eoin /o-in/ in Irish, boys' name, Irish version of "John".

There's a lot more as I really care about names, but I don't feel like listing them all!

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK

Eoin == Owen, if you're looking for the Irish version of John that would be Seán

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487

Are you sure? I checked Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla:

m. (gs. ~). 1. ~ Baiste, St. John the Baptist. ~ Broinne, John the beloved disciple. S.a. luibh. 2. An Leabhar ~, the Gospel according to St. John; extract from St. John’s gospel incorporated in amulet.

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK

It may have somewhat the same origin. Though Eoin is definitely pronounced as Owen, whereas Seán has a much closer origine to the English John. The confusion probably arises from the fact that in Irish Eoin is used for the biblical figures called John in English.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eoin

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487

I can't argue much further as I'm limited to these resources, but as far as I've heard it (in Irish series, more Connacht dialect) when pronouncing Eoin, the /v/ doesn't appear, or is very weak.
Wikipedia also says the Biblical figures of "John" are referred to as "Eoin" (which doesn't prove anything by itself, I didn't see the edit when writing this), and that "Seán" has been derived from the Norman French "Jehan" (modern Jean) that originally goes to "John". (Which can be speculation)
Thanks for bringing it up! I'll search further and ask in the forums if needed. Should I send you a link?

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEeveeLord

I'm kinda biased towards this, but I like my Hebrew name, נח (Noach), meaning "rest" or "comfort."

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot

It looks a lot like "Noah", so I'm guessing that Noach is the Hebrew derivative. (I say "derivative" because Noah is a Biblical name and it would make sense for the Hebrew version to be the earliest one). To be honest, it's actually a really nice name.

I'm a little biased when it comes to my own given name (Zoë), which means "life" in Greek. It's also a very popular name in the United States, but it's usually spelled Zoe (without the umlaut) or Zoey. I've met at least seven other girls with my same name, and only two of them spelled theirs the same way I do. I still like my name, maybe because of it's meaning.

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEeveeLord

Yep, Noah is the English equivalent, (Fun fact, נח is a masculine name, but נועה, pronounced like Noah, is a feminine name).

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Olivia_Beringer

I love all sorts of names:

Angelika (French, Feminine) It means Angel Evelina (Swedish, Feminine) It means light and life Felix (Swedish, Male) It means happy and lucky Eleanora (Swedish, Feminine) It means light Priscilla (Italian, Feminine) It means Old-time Bryce (French, Male) It means "speckled" Calvin (French, Male) Its used as a name of honor Chandler (French, Male) It means "Candle seller" Fitzgerald (French, Male) It means son of a powerful ruler Lavelle (French, Male) It means valley Noelle (French, feminine) It means Christmas Orville (French, Male) It means golden village Paris (French, Neutral) It means crafty Percy (French, Male) It means pierce the valley Juliet (french, Feminine) It means youthful

March 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7

Habeas Corpus
(The name I gave to the mystery bug who took a nibble at my leg two nights ago while I was asleep.)

From Latin habeas, 2nd person singular present subjunctive active of habere, "to have", "to hold"; and corpus, accusative singular of corpus "body". In reference to more than one person, habeas corpora.

In our present day, Habeas Corpus preserves the legal right of a person not to be held without reason as determined by a judge. This was a huge leap forward for liberty. A person couldn't just be throne into jail or prison indefinitely without a judge issuing a court order. It helps to preserve the idea of innocent until proven guilty.

Literally, the phrase means "you may have the body". The complete phrase habeas corpus ad subjiciendum means "you may have the person for the purpose of subjecting him/her to (examination)". These are the opening words of writs in 14th century Anglo-French documents requiring a person to be brought before a court or judge, especially to determine if that person is being legally detained.[5]

One reason for the writ to be sought by a person other than the prisoner is that the detainee might be held incommunicado. Most civil law jurisdictions provide a similar remedy for those unlawfully detained, but this is not always called habeas corpus.[3] For example, in some Spanish-speaking nations, the equivalent remedy for unlawful imprisonment is the amparo de libertad ('protection of freedom').

The right to petition for a writ of habeas corpus has nonetheless long been celebrated as the most efficient safeguard of the liberty of the subject. The jurist Albert Venn Dicey wrote that the British Habeas Corpus Acts "declare no principle and define no rights, but they are for practical purposes worth a hundred constitutional articles guaranteeing individual liberty".[4] Source of quoted text.

March 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia

Habeus Corpus is thought to be of Anglo-Saxon origin and to have predated the Magna Carta signed under duress by King John in 1215. Its first recorded use was in 1305, although the actual Habeus Corpus Act itself was not passed by Parliament until 1679.

March 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7

Oh wow! I didn't know it had been around so long!

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia

Indeed it has, in fact being of Anglo-Saxon origin dates it to at least before the Norman Conquest in 1066 and probably long before that. Unfortunately, as it forms part of the corpus of unwritten Common Law there is no way of knowing for certain exactly when it first came into being.

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7

What a historically heavy name I have given to a bug! haha.

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia

Well, even if you did go round squishing bugs indiscriminately I think you'd struggle to squish Habeus Corpus ....... many have tried and many have failed, so if you did squash the bug it must have been an imposter. :-)))

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia

Haven't you just! I hope it merits its illustrious title. :-)

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7

Genia, mostly it was a nod to the other bugs, that I won't be squishing indiscriminately. lol

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/djellzpa

Haneul (gender-neutral, Korean). It can mean "heaven" or "sky" <3

March 9, 2017
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