"Eu gostaria se você me trouxesse um suco."

Translation:I would like it if you brought me some juice.

March 10, 2014

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brad.scott

"Bring me 'a' juice" is something we wouldn't say in English. It would be more like "bring me 'some' juice."

March 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reidlearnsguitar

If your juice is in boxes or cans, then Duo's sentence is perfectly valid.

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fallacy79

Perhaps this is regional as here in London, UK we would say 'some juice'. If it were in a can we would say 'a can of juice' so again, not 'a juice'. Also we would say 'a carton...' not 'a box...'

January 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reidlearnsguitar

Juice boxes are a thing in a lot of places. Especially in the US, where it almost seems like the only way that juice comes.

February 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PacoWarabi

As I explain to my ESL students, "juice" is a non-count noun, like most liquids (milk, water, beer). You can't attach a number or singular indefinite article to it normally. However, when we do use a number, we are referring to the container it comes in (cup, glass, carton, can, etc.). If you went to a bar, you wouldn't order "some beer," but it would be perfectly acceptable order "a beer." Juice can be used in a similar way.

March 17, 2017

[deactivated user]

    "some" is probably more usual, but "a juice" is not surprising, to me. I'm more surprised by "I would like if you brought", I think that this would not be said by natural Ennglish speakers.

    I think "I would like you to bring me..." or "I would like it if you brought me ..."

    July 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guibotaro

    "i would like if you bring me a juice" why is that wrong? no sense...

    February 25, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnny_Lingot

    As I I understand it, the conditional must be paired with either the infinitive or the past subjunctive.

    "I would like you to bring me a juice." "I would like it if you brought me a juice."

    Cheers.

    February 25, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

    Correct. The first sentence is a straightforward request, and the second is an indirect/ineffectual way of requesting something. Both are in the indicative mode. Portuguese uses subjunctive verbs more often than does English.

    April 12, 2015

    [deactivated user]

      Why ineffectual ? It can be the response to "Do you want me to bring you a/some juice ?"

      "I would like it if you brought me some juice" (agreed, that's a lot of breath, or key strokes, for "yes")

      July 2, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cazort

      I'm not 100% sure if this is proper grammar in English but it's CERTAINLY common use, I am going to suggest this as a correct alternate translation.

      September 6, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

      "Like" is a transitive verb, so it requires an object - in this case: "it". It is likely that most of us include "it" in our speech, but we speak quickly and the pronoun is naturally reduced, so that it's hard to hear.

      Change the order of the clauses to see why the object "it" is needed. "If you brought me some juice, I would like it."

      September 6, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cazort

      I think people actually say it without the "it"; it's not just that people aren't hearing it. I am a native English speaker and I've lived all 36 years of my life in the US, and have lived in many different parts of the us.

      Also, Google searches:

      "I would like if you" yields 1,010,000 results "I would like it if you" yields 1,040,000 results

      One may be "proper" standard grammar but it looks like in common use they are roughly equal. Since this course is teaching Portuguese, not English grammar, it makes sense to accept the "improper" form. IMHO.

      September 7, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

      It may be commonly spoken, but it shouldn't be accepted as grammatically correct because it isn't. This particular "tree" is teaching Portuguese, but Brazilians also use it to advance their English...and some may have to pass the TOEFL or the British equivalent which tests Standard English, not colloquial speech.

      September 7, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flemmilu

      Why not "I would like you to bring me some juice!?" It is semantically identical. It makes no sense. I would like it if you brought me a juice is a very construed phrase that one would rarely use. Only in a context of a relationship talk would something like this come up. This is not everyday English.

      August 27, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

      I agree. Your suggestion is the most natural English. DL's software tends to throw in a lot of robotic translations. Many have been improved over the years by human intervention, but there are more that need revision.

      August 27, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceHilary

      This translation still not accepted, although other sentences in this section are translated that way. Very frustrating.

      Anybody out there who can put it right?

      March 28, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delvi

      I am wondering why "gostaria" from "gostar" does not need the word "de" following it.... :)

      January 1, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melina.Arins

      In fact, the Portuguese grammar determines that the complement of the verb "gostar" must be always preceded by the preposition "de". So, according to that rule, some possible sentences would be:

      Eu gostaria de um suco.
      Eu gostaria de que você me trouxesse um suco.

      I do not imagine grammatically correct sentences with the conjunction "se" after the verb "gostar". It tends to be followed by "que" instead (still preceded by "de").

      Now, when it comes to daily speech (at least in Brazil, I cannot really tell about European Portuguese), it is a fact that people tend to omit the preposition "de" between the verb "gostar" and a complement introduced by the conjunction "que". Some may even find it odd to hear that preposition in the sentence.

      Maybe it all happened because of verbs with similar meanings like "apreciar", "amar", "adorar", which do not demand any preposition before a complement.

      July 23, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antlane

      think: Eu gostaria (de você) se gostasse de mim.

      July 23, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnny_Lingot

      As I understand it, the "de" is only needed when followed by a verb (infinitive). Ex: Eu gosto de nadar. When followed by a noun, the "de" combines with the article prefacing the noun (when there is one). Ex: Eu gosto do leite. If there is no article, then "de" is used. Ex: "Eu gosto de você". Finally, not needed in this case when followed by "se".

      January 4, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antlane

      Eu gostaria (de) que voce me trouxesse um suco. Only a purist puts de before a clause.

      March 6, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freddy22768

      why is: i would like you to bring me some juice wrong ??????

      July 3, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ichiban123

      i would like it if you were to bring me a juice. "were to bring" doesnt work because it's present subjunctive?

      January 24, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnny_Lingot

      It doesn't work because "were" is a form of the verb "to be", which does not appear in the Portuguese. While it shares the same meaning, a direct translation would require the past subjunctive of "ser" (fosse) plus the infinitive form of " to bring", if I'm not mistaken.

      January 24, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arturinho2

      um suco, some juice ? a juice or one juice right ?

      March 17, 2017
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