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"Ella ya decidió."

Translation:She already decided.

5 years ago

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mjwalshe55
mjwalshe55
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'She has already decided' should be allowed - In British English this would almost always be used instead of 'she already decided.'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunomi_fr
brunomi_fr
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I agree. I think it would even be considered grammatically incorrect to write 'she already decided'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeremyk1982

"She decided" is grammatically correct and "ya" is the adverb which further describes the verb. "She already decided" is correct grammar and is often used in the US as a simple declarative statement. "She HAS already decided" is often used in the US also, usually to make the statement seem more emphatic. Both are good translations, but Duo is probably expecting "tiene" for "has".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunomi_fr
brunomi_fr
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I meant: grammatically incorrect in British English. It is of course grammatically correct in the US to write 'she already decided'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeremyk1982

Yes, I understand more now, and I agree. I've had very little experience with the British culture, and I am learning that British and American English have significant differences. I've found myself lately using "already" the same as the British... it's safer that way. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crisjordan22

it is incorrect in British and American English. But the correct translation has decided is now accepted. Hurray

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It's actually not incorrect in American English.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You are partially correct. Like English, Spanish uses the verb "tener" as a transitive verb, but unlike English, Spanish does not use "tener" as a helping verb. Instead, Spanish conjugates past participles (also known as passive participles) with he (I have), has (you have [singular familiar]), ha (he, she, it, you [singular formal], or one has), hemos (we have), habeís (you have [familiar plural]), and han (they have/you have [formal plural]).

In other words, English uses the one word "have" NOT ONLY as a helping verb BUT ALSO as a translation of the transitive verb "tener." Also keep in mind that I only listed the conjugation of Spanish's present perfect tense. Other Spanish tenses–such as Preterite, Past, Conditional, Future, and Subjunctive–use additional forms of "helping verbs" that I have not listed here. If you want to know how to conjugate these additional Spanish tenses, see: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugation/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dokterblom

I agree with "has already decided"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roberto232323

Noo-that would be 'Ella ya ha decidido' using the present perfect tense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NedWhite

The literal meaning of this SPANISH sentence is correct. To change it to include "has" in the answer would mean using the perfect tense: "Ella ya ha decidido"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willeddey

Yep, she already decided is just the dilect while the good english is the one that uses the present perfect

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Very funny sarcasm, but for those who don't get it, I want to add that this is preposterous.

What you wrote is equivalent to saying that Castilian Spanish is preferable to the Spanish dialects spoken in South America, and British English is preferable to American English, Canadian English, or any other regional dialect of English.

I myself do not have an opinion about the superiority of any particular dialect, but somewhere in Duo, I read that some people have come to consider that the Spanish dialects of North and South America are the linguistically dominant ones and that American English is now dominant over British English. It's a brave new world.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukaszZJawora

If theory, that English emerged due to creolization process, is correct then American English is just overcreolised version :D

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That argument has no foundation. A creole language is a pidgin language that becomes the native language of a speech community. A pidgin language is a language that develops in individuals of a subordinate group of people when in contact with a dominant language group. American English is not a creole nor was it ever a pidgin language. The creole language that people speak about in the US is the French creole spoken in Louisiana. American English is actually in some ways more like the English spoken in England at the time of the Mayflower. In other ways, British English is more similar to that. The fact of the matter is that languages change constantly, and always develop regional variations. Separating the speech communities by an ocean and subsequent political division will automatically increase the diversity of the dialects. This was especially true at that time. In the modern age of advanced telecommunications with phone, video conferencing, television and the internet, the chances are the changes would be more subtle. Look at the difference between Canadian English and US English. Here proximity to the US did cause Canadians to adopt some of our uses, but maintaining a closer political connection with the UK has also caused some retention or adoption of British terms.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghayle16

As of August 4 2015 she has already decided has now already accepted.. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes I put she decided already instead of she already decided because I missed the have in the other syntax. But Duo is really consistent about its tense for tense practice, except when it cannot be avoided. So since this was not in present perfect in Spanish I didn't use present perfect in the translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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I agree with this being not good English (almost certainly an Americanism!) Strictly Speaking though the Spanish would be Ella ya ha decidido, to be that exact more correct English phrase. I think?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Not good English" is your opinion.

Tambien, no es muy importante donde se situa la palabra en una frase de íngles.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yakmcgurk

Or even more simply: she has decided.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mobabrm

I agree. In American English as well, "She already decided" is at the very least awkward. "Already," with its sense of a completed action, calls for the perfective, to the extent that if this action took place in the past it should even be "She had already decided"...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crisjordan22

She decided on Wednesday. OK. If she had decided on Tuesday, by Wednesday she would have already decided. You cannot already decide. Its surely wrong either here in England or in the US.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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This is clearly a sentence in English which is better in the present perfect. But I have heard it said like this quite a bit. I think most people would say I have or I've already decided. But in the third person especially it is often in the simple past. Duo tries to stick to it's tense for tense convention, so that is enough for me to accept this translation. But I am actually more interested in the relative frequency of ya decidió vs ya había decidido. That is what I am actually here to learn. Discussing what one does or doesn't say in English is somewhat irrelevant to the extent that it is all native speakers talking. It's the Spanish we want to understand.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Betelgeuse11
Betelgeuse11
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Is there a Spanish equivalent of this distinction in English?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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The only thing you can do is report it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

I agree about the british English. It is grammatically incorrect to say " she already decided ". I find it frustrating that I have to use the incorrect form, since Duolingo doesnt accept " has decided".(as far as I know) In the same way, Duolingo didnt accept "has arrived" in the earlier exercise. Here, one had to write " She already arrived" !!!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I understand what everyone with British English is saying but the truth is that in America we don't add 'had' 'have'. Its the evolution of a language geographically but that doesn't make it incorrect, just slightly different. Just report that you want it added.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I've been researching and contemplating this issue in English: North Americans dropping the "have/has" in present perfect constructions. It is very common in North American English and is not generally considered incorrect.

What's interesting (to me at least) is that the perfect is still implied; we're just "being lazy" by dropping the have/has. Take this example of question and answer: "Did you eat yet?" Many (at least in N.A.) would respond, "Yes, I have" or "No, I haven't" even though the have/has is not in the question. Which is to say, the person asking is not making the inquiry out of idle curiosity about your past behavior, but rather to know your current state of hunger -- thus the present perfect is understood, even without the "have/has".

Context is important. Spoken language often takes shortcuts because we usually have a lot of context. One of the reasons I find e-mail challenging is that it often takes on the informality of casual spoken language, but it is often lacking in context and thus prone to misunderstanding.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunomi_fr
brunomi_fr
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Although I'm not a native speaker, having learnt British English I would ask "Have you eaten yet?" rather than "did you eat yet?". Which would be coherent with the answers "Yes, I have" or "no, I haven't", by the way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

And you would be correct! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathan.r69

I would simply answer with a "yes" or "no".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/placeybordeaux

I am American and I use has in this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gejemica
gejemica
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You're not necessarily dropping the "have" part so much as you're changing the tense. English uses the simple past (preterite) and compound past (perfect) and they have very similar semantic meaning that's hard to actually qualify.

The English simple past conjugation of a verb and its past participle are almost always the same for regular verbs.

"She decided" is the simple past "She has decided" is the perfect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

And while we're at it, every time I have strengthened a topic, I don't like to be told 'you strengthened ...' It should be 'You have strengthened ...' - Unless it was saying, for example, 'Yesterday you strengthened ...' -

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Sounds like you're British!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimmy232Neiman

I'm American and say the" has" is important the literal nature of much of the translating sounds curt to my ear. I knew there was a chance it would reject it but put has anyway as it is better.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kevinp2k13

Should the correct sentence not be "She had decided already" (I don't know the spanish form of this tense yet)?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

nope :) "had decided" will be different "was deciding" is different, too

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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How would one say "she HAD already decided"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Ella ya había decido. That is the past perfect and is formed with the imperfect of the verb Haber and the past participle of the main verb which in this case is decider. The present perfect, past perfect and future perfect on different levels of the tree if you haven't gotten there yet. But beware of the verb Haber. It is translated as have/has because of its use on the perfect tenses, but. It cannot mean have except as the auxiliary verb in the perfect. It cannot be used instead of Tener and Tener cannot be used here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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Thanks. That's very useful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klooth
klooth
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I'm American, and I would say "She already decided" and "She has already decided". But to my ear, they can have slightly different meanings, depending on context. "She already decided" has more finality to it: she made up her mind. "She has already decided" sounds a little bit less committal; it's possible she could reconsider her decision.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I don't remember the difference with "she decided yet". Help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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I'm pretty sleepy so sorry if this doesn't make sense. There's more on this topic at http://esl.about.com/od/common_mistakes/a/Already-And-Yet.htm

'Yet' is mostly used in questions and negative sentences, usually with perfect tenses: 'Has he arrived yet?'

'Already' is used in positive sentences to say that something has happened, perhaps earlier than expected: 'I wasn't expecting him for another hour but he's already arrived.'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinPoole

Audio sounds like decivio

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunomi_fr
brunomi_fr
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could be a question of accent. I recently heard a native Spanish speaker whose ending "d" were sounding like something else, between "v" and "th"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

To me, it sounded like "recivio". The audio part of this program has caused me to lose many many points. No matter how many times I listen to one sentence, and sometimes the fast sound is very different from the slow sound and the difference will give me a clue, but this time, both sounded like "recivio". Oh well...Pura Vida as they say here in Costa Rica...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jhm718

I answered "She just decided." DuoLingo disagreed and corrected to "She now decided". I believe these are synonymous.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gejemica
gejemica
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While both are possible translations they aren't quite synonymous. "She now decided..." sounds more like prose from a story and would almost never be a complete sentence in itself.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankSchaap

How about: She just decided...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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She just decided means that it just happened now. Already means the decision has been made but the when can be more distant in time. She just decided is perhaps better expressed in Spanish by Ella acabó de decidir or it could be in the present tense Ella acaba de decidir since acaba de is used to express that something just happened.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I agree with what you said, but I would add that "acabar" is a Spanish verb that has the meaning of the English word "just," a modifier that can be used as either an adjective or an adverb!

"Ella acabó de decidir" should be translated as "She just decided," which is simple past tense English (and preterite in Spanish?), and "Ella acaba decidir" should be translated as "She is just deciding," which is present progressive tense in English, rather than just simple present tense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cole988405

Is "She just decided" passable?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

No, she has already decided would be YA HA DECIDIDO. YOUR CONFUSING YOURSELF AND OTHERS.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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Spanish and English are different languages with different grammar rules.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skybanner

My answer was, "she decided" was incorrect. According to the program, "she decided now" was the correct solution. As a native English speaker that doesn't come across as intuitive. Perhaps I was missing an adjective but my first thought was it was not necessary.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Ya is often used a little more for emphasis of the verb than the creation of a timeline with already. But it is something that should be omitted. These translations should be made more like diplomatic translation than literary ones. Creative license is not encouraged for the most part. If something was said which has a comparable translation in English, you translate it. It's important because it demonstrates that you understand all elements of the sentence

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RowenaJane
RowenaJane
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I would like to know if 'Ella ya decidio' is actually used in Spanish at all because grammatically it does require 'has' in English, or was this sentence created for Americans only

?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Absolutely they say it in Spanish.

http://www.elsalvador.com/noticias/internacional/419001/el-papa-francisco-recibio-un-lamborghini-y-ya-decidio-que-hacer-con-el-auto-deportivo/

http://m.milenio.com/futbolinternacional/chapecoense-campeon-copa_sudamericana-conmebol-milenio-la_aficion_0_857914435.html

There were many other options to present. The easiest way to answer a question like yours is with the power of Google. Perhaps it is easier for Americans to grasp these constructions because we are somewhat more flexible with options, although I would tend to put this sentence in the present perfect as well, but when it serves to best reflect the way things are actually said in Spanish all the better.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HectorDesa6

What's wrong with 'she has decided'. Better then now decided.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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Can ya in this sentence be placed either at the front, or at the end of the sentence? The general question, is where to place the ya in a given sentence, are there any rules?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I believe that ya can be placed either before or after the verb, but before the verb is much more common. My impression of Spanish is that when a word is generally placed towards the beginning of a sentence, placing it at the end increases the emphasis.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/travellers2

Whilst it is the past tense, in english one would say ...she had decided.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Whilst" is considered to be an archaic word that means "while," and "English" is always capitalized.

1 year ago