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"Sie schloss die Tür und ging nach oben."

Translation:She shut the door and went upstairs.

February 25, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fritsvds

I thought "Schließen" could also mean "to lock". Does anyone know if this is correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lev.levitsky

I think it would be "abschließen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skyjo77

There are "schloss" > "geschlossen" > "to close" and "schloss [ab]" > "abschließen" > "to lock".

Colloquially, both terms are often interchanged. "schloss" (schließen; normal) and "schloss [ab]" (abschließen; reduced to: schloss).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lull0000

Hello. Could someone explain the use of "nach" in this sentence? How do I know when I need to add "nach" before a location?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kehaugland

I remember reading that you use nach for countries or for general directions, like "nach Osten, nach Westen, nach Großbritannien." It makes sense that up and down would be similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfblaze

I have a notes file in which I annotate whatever I find important to remember from German natives here in DL. I have something regarding this:

"Nach describes movement" "Zu describes state"

I got it wrong, too. German is tricky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skb97

Nach is also used for directions. In this case upstairs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GustavoSar16

In this case nach is an adverb of time. Implies that after she closed the door, she went upstairs.

For locations: nach is used always for geographic ones (contries, states, continents and cardinal directions), while zu and its contractions are for the rest.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SquareFrame

Could one say "und ging oben", without the use of nach?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodrigoToran

why is above not accepted? the hints are problematic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skyjo77

"Upstairs" or "up" is used for residential units/properties, buildings, and working areas. "A person who goes from one room to a room upstairs."

"Above" is more suitable for descriptions (f. i: Results that are above the average) or maybe even for "on top".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KlausN0mi

In another context, Schloss (Schloß) also means "Castle" or fortified building that can be locked and secured. The Etymology of the German language is very fascinating. (Yes, I am a total nerd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/needacpa

Why not "closed"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enigmajf

I wrote"........went to upstairs and was marked wrong? Does it makes the difference?

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