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  5. "À chacun ses goûts."

"À chacun ses goûts."

Translation:To each his own.

March 11, 2014

262 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amritraj

can you please help as to when this expression is usually used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DXLi

It means that every person is entitled to his own tastes. This is usually used to acknowledge when someone else's opinion differs from yours.

A: "Hey, do you want some of this chocolate ice cream?"

B: "No, I only like foods that taste like gorilla saliva."

A: "... To each his own, I guess."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markon

Different strokes for different folks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OpalTones

AAARRRGHHH, I know what song that's from, I just can't place it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sedona2007

Sly and the Family Stone - Everyday People "And different strokes for different folks And so on and so on and scooby dooby doo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mayokun3

Perhaps similar to saying "one man's food is another's poison"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxx524750

In Germany, dem einen sein Uhl (owl) ist dem anderen sein Nachtigall(nightingale)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Te7h6

Jedem das sein? Or is it not okay to use it anymore?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WRbl10

I personally wouldn't use this particular idiom in Germany, because it is tinged with a the Buchenwald concentration camp. It was written on the main gate ("Jedem das Seine").

Use instead "Über Geschmack lässt sich nicht streiten"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leoburca

And in Romanian: Gusturile nu se discută. Meaning Tastes are not to be discussed. OR Fiecare bordei, un alt obicei. Meaning: every (old traditional) house, a different habit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FranMoraes14

Same as in portuguese: " gosto não se discute"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erickdelasnubes

Or in spanish: "Cada quien sus gustos" or "En gustos se rompen géneros" in order to let other incomprehensible tastes be... n_n'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diana_03_22

I guess it comes from Latin de gustibus non discutandum...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/actimelekuwu

This has to be the best explaination ive ever read i swear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dejanradoj

De gustibus et coloribus non est disputandum


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dejanradoj

O ukusima se ne raspravlja


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TinyAnime

Why gorilla saliva???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taorizi

Hi , the point is to creatively illustrate the difference of opinions on what tastes good to one and not the other .. insert any reference you wish .. slightly aged alien roadkill, somewhat off slightly greenish tinged skin of the Kraken, Bridge Troll hairs ... whatever your fancy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taorizi

On a similiar, but not the same, tangent > 'One man's trash is another man's treasure'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FranklinPaz1

I've learnt a new phrase today "To each his own." lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElenaLeah

In danish Its "Hver sin smag"..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1gunnel

And in Swedish "Smaken är som baken, delad", meaning Taste is like the behind, divided.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randomidee

In Malay, it is "Lain padang, lain belalang". When translated directly it is "different field, different grasshopper". It means that different places/people have different ways/tastes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AttilaMoln1

In Hungarian "ízlések és pofonok különbözőek". It means tastes and slaps in the face can be different"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonicaBaha1

I'm learning Swedish and I probably wouldn't have come across this otherwise. Tack så mycket!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasArn

Also in Norwegian: "smaken er som baken, delt i to"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NarueSaeng

In Thai, นานาจิตตัง ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertWolfe

In Hebrew, it is ""כל אחד וטעמו שלו עצמו


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzw112

A more idiomatic Hebrew expression is: על טעם ועל ריח אין להתוכח.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitegiraf1

Translation please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lee569810

the translation would be- on food and smell(wich are opinoins) you cant argue


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PapyXM

1gunnel wrote: And in Swedish "Smaken är som baken, delad", meaning Taste is like the behind, divided.

It's worth to mention! ;o)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaques89240

in English: to each his own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athelari

And in Indonesian, it's "Lain orang, lain selera"; literally, "different person, different taste(s)".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JahedulAlam

In Bengali we say, "ভিন্ন মানুষ, ভিন্ন স্বাধ" (vinno manush, vinno shadh) which means, "differenet person, different choices."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

This I will remember! Mange Takk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horror_Sans

In Japanese, it's (speaks Japanese)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkikoKato7

蓼食う虫も好き好き (Tade kuu mushi mo suki zuki) or 十人十色(Juunin toiro)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OpalTones

Not helpful. Like, at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinHolst3

Suveränt att delta med lite svenska här! Such a good phrase for finding a diplomatic END to a minor conflict...


[deactivated user]

    In portuguese "Gosto é como bunda. Todo mundo tem a sua" or "Taste is like ass. Everyone has one." Colorful isn´t it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tikvah_18

    That would be Brazilian Portuguese and, I'm guessing, slang, and not used in polite conversation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desire8alejandra

    In Spanish it's "Sobre gustos y colores no han escrito los autores" or "About tastes and colours the writers don't write" or something like that


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

    I'm Russian. Ours is similar "На вкус и на цвет товарищей нет" which also goes in rhyme and literally means: "When it comes to taste or colour, there are no comrades"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinPau1

    I would think of it Каждому своё


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KirillKozlovsky

    Also a humorous version: "на вкус и цвет все фломастеры разные" (When it comes to taste and colour, all sharpies are different).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fioasiedu

    If im not mistaken, they have a french version if that as well Les gouts et les couleurs on ne discute pas.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

    Des goûts et des couleurs on ne discute pas.

    De gustibus non est disputandum.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    I still have nightmares from my latin lessons in school,thank God that's over


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankOvares

    "Si gustos no hubiera, a nadie se complaciera" or also "En la variedad está el gusto."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FramingNoise

    Spanish Duolingo teaches "cada loco con su tema" which I always liked :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/je.saenz139

    the one i know (Colombia) is "entre gustos no hay disgustos"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElAmotro

    Hhahaha, that's heard a lot here in colombia, but with a little variation "Cada loco con su cuento" also "Para gustos los colores"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

    Similar to the Hebrew "על טעם ועל ריח אין להתווכח". No use arguing over taste or smell


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liam1987

    At least in Argentina people use "sobre gustos no hay nada escrito".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_david.saltos_

    Donde yo vivo se dice "Para gustos y sabores no opinan los doctores".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jente_1997

    In Dutch it's "smaken verschillen" which means "tastes differ", pretty boring if I read the Swedish and Hungarian equivalents :')


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo_H.

    In German it is "Jedem das Seine."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horror_Sans

    Thank you, but it's too laye, I failed a German class due to bad connection at websites, boredom, and a teacher with not that many rules, and loss of interest. This was many years before I started using Duolingo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Florlice

    In Dutch it's similar: 'elk zijn eigen smaak'. It adds 'egen'. :) I suppose the Dutch has two.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitegiraf1

    Meaning what, literally?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xenia255

    The Spanish version would be "cada uno a lo suyo"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivy1239

    Me to friend: do you want my pizza? Friend: No, pizza is not good for you, never!!! Me: Um, okayyyyyyy, to ech is own


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rita567891

    I say this all the time when I am fighting with someone


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hansgrrkloss

    There is one place where the locals would run away from you or at least think bad things about you if said it. This place is Germany. They can't get over it and have indeed lost common sense when it comes to it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/out_of_bound

    It's usually used at the gates of concentration camps


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
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    • 2796

    Are you seriously conflating "à chacun ses goûts" (to each their own) with "arbeit macht frei" (work sets you free)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinTsha

    In Chinese, “众口难调” or “萝卜青菜各有所爱”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.stiR

    unfortunately there's no Chinese Duolingo course yet :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheWiseTurtle

    For the non-Chinese speakers, I believe the second one translates literally to "Carrots and greens have their likings!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epingchris

    It'd be rather more like "radish" ("red" 萝卜 is "carrot", "white" 萝卜 is "radish" if you're more precise :p), but yeah, that's the idea :p (I hear it more often the other way around, 青菜蘿蔔 "greens and radishes", at least in Taiwan)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheWiseTurtle

    You are right. Silly me! :P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AileenGuan

    Turnip is a more precise translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

    青菜 doesn't mean "greens". It is a more specific type of greens. It usually refers to Shanghai bokchoi.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AileenGuan

    It is the passive voice here. As in turnips or greens are liked BY someone. The someone is implied.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathilde_Jin

    英文是不是应该翻译成 everyone has his own taste ? 在茫茫英文评论中看见中文实在是太高兴了!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carbon_CN

    Kind of, "to each their own" is a little more like "各行其是".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AileenGuan

    In Northern China, we say '一个萝卜, 一个坑。', which literally translates to 'Each turnip has its own hole.'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imogenbeazley

    Isn't this the same as "there's no accounting for tastes"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkredpurple

    "To each his own" accepts that people like different things. The other one is a put down. It is saying the other persons views are wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Velcrocity

    And also as "Tastes differ." I think.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

    I offered it. but Dl didn't accept it :(. I reported it, perhaps more than once, but to no avail...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuillaumeB715310

    "Tout les gouts sont dans la nature" is another similar one


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NieTrzebaNas

    I wonder why "Different strokes for different folks" (which essentially means: different people like different things) is not accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitegiraf1

    It should, it means the same, but perhaps because it is slang on top of being an idiom. I think it only became popular in the 60s and 70s.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gbarge

    Duo didn't accept "Each ONE to their own taste", even thought "chacun" is literally "each one".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2796

    Translation is not about word-for-word substitution. In English, we say it as "To each their own" or "To each his own". In French, they say "À chacun ses goûts".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emma.c.e

    thankyou for noting "to each their own" first - I've always heard that said growing up in the UK, never his. definitely a more modern version.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sxlty_Teardrxps

    Its because idiots only care about men and never put women or one instead.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Velcrocity

    In Japanese, 蓼喰う虫も好きずき.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

    what about whatever floats your boat? It's the perferred translation on the equivalent portuguese idiom


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam-Rabel

    I don't know about the French, but the two English idioms are different. "To each his own" is more respectful. "Whatever..." is more informal / sarcastic / rude.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PugLove888

    E. Adam-Rabel, I'm sorry, but I disagree. While whatever float your boat might be considered sarcastic or rude I've used it often in a cheerful and happy way!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HowardWigg

    Adam is right. There is a different connotation to "whatever floats your boat."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conqueror_Elmo

    It said before just "chacun ses gouts" was the answer. But here it says theres the "A". So... clarify?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHazard

    In another forum, a more knowledgeable contributor than me listed the "à" as optional. I hope Duolingo accepts translations with or without it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conqueror_Elmo

    Oh, it does. I was just wondering.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timmyshanti

    TO each... -> à chacun... pretty obvious, innit?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sun_dance

    In Russian it's "Каждому свое". Эй, русские, привет!))


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    Hello my russian brothers! Greetings from serbia :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horror_Sans

    And hello from I-don't-know-much-about-Russia


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillowTan

    Can it be to each HER own?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.P.Niers

    If you're talking to a woman, I don't see why not.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrionLee

    Or "To each one's own", or even "to each tade own", as I was thinking to bring ta (他、她、它 in Chinese pinyin) and tade (ta加上的,form the possessive pronoun) into English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HowardWigg

    I get your point, but this is an expression. It doesn't have to be literal. When you say, "To each her own," you are putting the emphasis on feminism more than varying tastes. You've changed the meaning to, "Women have the right to their own tastes."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoiraSheph

    Thats not really accurate. It's not at all uncommon to change an idiom to suit who you're referring to - much less weird that assigning genders to every single noun, like in French itself, in fact.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
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    • 2796

    Grammatical gender as a linguistic feature is not weird at all. Like all linguistic features, it has a use.

    David Peterson (the guy who invented Dothraki) explains grammatical gender in one of his YouTube videos about conlanging.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    It's not weird at all,nor is french the only language that does that


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sxlty_Teardrxps

    Excuse me. But to each his own is emphasizing the man. So shouldn't the meaning be men have the right to their own tastes. People are idiots if they think a gender is more important. I don't think girls are stronger. I don't think boy are stronger. I belive they are equal and should be treated equally. Apart from clothes. The only difference between a man and a woman is physical. Men are not smarter .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horror_Sans

    sighs I am a woman and I am going to say this: men actually are physically stronger, but we are JUST AS (not more either) important because we give life to babies. But heck, I don't care about any of that stuff anymore, I just say it is what it is and I am used to gender inequality, and I'm ok with that as long as it's not too far, that's just how humans are.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    I don't think you should be okay with gender inequality, though I do believe we can never be trully equal, BUT should be treated the same. But I mean it in this sense, eg Of course mothers will have maternity leaves that are longer than father's, they're more important in the first months of baby's life, both psychologically and biologically, it would simpy be inhumane to even make a woman who's just had a baby work. And it would affect the baby too. Of course standards for say passing a physical test for police or something like that are different for men and women. We can't have the same rights 100%. However, we should have the same chance of getting the same job, getting paid for it the same, not having votes that are worth less, getting punished for the crimes the same etc. If some men are misogynistic, don't have sex with them and they won't be able to reproduce and pass on that same narrow-minded genes. Of course, I'm aware it's not that easy, but it would certainly cut down that percentage at least a bit. Teach your kids to have respect for everyone, instead of complaining about sexist grammar on ❤❤❤❤❤❤ duolingo.

    (This was not intended to you, except for the part about being okay with gender inequlity thing, never be okay with something unfair! :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loopendend

    No, this phrase is the same with everyone you tell it to and doesn't change based on who you tell it to. To each her/his/your own doesn't make sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sxlty_Teardrxps

    So a girl would say to a girl to each his own.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sxlty_Teardrxps

    THANK YOU FINALLY SOMEONE WHO SAYS THE SAME THINGS AS ME.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    Just say To each their own if you're that afraid of mentioning men, God forbid You people really love to blow things out of proportion, and frankly, are getting way too annoying with your 3rd wave feminism


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horror_Sans

    I think people are taking it too far ahem, feminists(and I am a woman saying this). Man stands for mankind, which stands for humans, so just let it be


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    Oh I'm a woman too, but I'm getting sick and tired of people complaining about the smallest thing whilst living in a first world country that absolutely does not face such problems. Of course feminism is still needed, but not even nearly as much as it used to be, and this 3rd wave is nothing but bullshiit. There are women that can't show anything but their eyes for Christ's sake and then we have people over here complaining about fcking grammar. This world needs a reality check


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoSay13751

    gustibus non es disputandum


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

    Should be rather: De gustibus non disputandum EST. By the way, I'm waiting for a Latin course on Duo with impatience...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    I aint't taking that one,I still have trauma from my latin lessons in school,hated that class


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    Though,I did like learning latin sayings,just think our professor went a liiiittle overboard with 100 at once

    -10/10 would come back again


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wilbe1981

    I remember this from high school as Chacun son goût. Is this a correct way to say this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liit4m

    That works as well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen613612

    Thanks... I'd remembered "Chacun à son gôut" & thought I'd got it wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/androoha

    I guess it's the same as german "Jedem das seine"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    More likely "Über Geschmack lässt sich nicht streiten".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.P.Niers

    Same as in Dutch: ‘Over smaak valt niet te twisten.’

    Or ‘Ieder zijn meug.’ which is often expanded to ‘Ieder zijn meug, zei de boer en hij at vijgen met stroop.’ Of course, there are many variants of this, some of which are quite obscene... ‘Ieder zijn meug, zei de boer en hij ____ zijn zeug.’


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Restcb

    In Spanish: "cada quien con sus gustos".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannamannah

    In Estonian this would translate to as "Maitse üle ei vaielda", in English literally "One should not argue over taste"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

    En polonais: O gustach się nie dyskutuje = On ne dispute pas a propos de ses gouts.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goran12

    In Czech: "Každému podle jeho gusta" or "Proti gustu žádný dišputát" - the latter was a favorite saying of my great-grandfather, so I use it, even though it's bit archaic.

    Or: "Každému co jeho jest" - this one is not so food-related and it means the same as "to each his own" - both literally and idiomatically.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Basiecka

    Or "jak kto lubi"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuzanaLagova

    Každému podľa jeho gusta = "À chacun ses goûts."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas_Marcel

    In portuguese: gosto nao se discute


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mtucristina

    In italian we use the latin phrase "de gustibus"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Full phrase: "De gustibus non est disputandum."

    (At least, that's the way I know it.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konim96

    What's the difference between son and ses? they both seem to mean his/her/its


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

    You are right that all of them mean his/her/its, but they depend on a genre: son - masculin singular, e.g.: Paul a un livre. Son livre est interessant. sa - feminin singular, e.g.: Paul a une chienne. Sa chienne est belle. ses - masculin/feminin plural, e.g.: Paul a beaucoup de livres. Ses livres sont interessants.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuyIT

    Could I get a literal translation please? It helps me understand how the French think with their idioms


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SassanSanei

    Literally, "to each their tastes":

    à = to

    chacun = each

    ses = their

    goûts = tastes


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowenaJane

    Except that 'ses' means 'his' or 'her' not 'their


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

    These days native English speakers widely use 'their' to refer to a single subject whose gender is uncertain. In that case, the French use 'ses' instead of 'leurs' to modify a plural object.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowenaJane

    I am speaking of proper English and French not colloquial use of language. To defend that argument is not teaching people correct French or English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

    "Everyone knows their rights", for example, is proper English and is nowadays considered to be the only correct way of saying it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rawcliff

    The common English expression is 'Each to his/her/their own'. I've never encountered the American English version in the UK, yet!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SassanSanei

    In Canadian English, I have only ever heard "To each his own" or "To each their own."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowenaJane

    I put 'everyone to his own' which is what I would say and it was marked wrong!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam-Rabel

    I've never heard either of those (having lived all my life in various parts of the U.S.). However, my Cuban immigrant father loves to say, "To each his own."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HowardWigg

    "To each their own" is politically-correct, but it is incorrect grammar. "Their" is not singular. It never will be.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

    You'd better tell Shakespeare that then. The use of "their" as a gender-neutral third-person singular pronoun far out-dates those who say it's incorrect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2796

    The singular "they" is just as old as the singular "you" and has nothing to do with "political correctness". So if thou art against the singular "they" thou might as well also be against the singular "you". All of thine arguments against the singular "they" can also be applied against the singular "you". But presumably thou copest well with "you" being used for both plural and singular, dost thou not?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitegiraf1

    Nay, verily, we prefer 'y'all' in parts of America. But of course, that is a sub-dialectal difference, particular to certain regions. (And it may be used both for the singular and the plural!)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sxlty_Teardrxps

    No their means belonging to them. His means belonging to him. Hers means belonging to her


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soroush94

    I wonder if that is "عیسی به دین خود، موسی به دین خود" in Persian?! o.O


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djule95

    Serbian "o ukusima se ne raspravlja"- "tastes are not to be discussed"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/austinc_

    In Russian it's: о вкусах не спорят. Which can be literally translated as: There is no use of arguing over preferences.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mdastjerdy

    به فارسی میگویند موسی به دین خود عیسی به دین خود. In persian "Moses in his religion, Jesus in his religion." or هر سَری عقلی دارد. In persian " Each head has a rationale."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teapot.azi

    Here in Slovakia we also say "Sto ľudí, sto chutí." which translates to A hundred people have a hundred tastes.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

    Sto ljudi,sto ćudi :) Greetings from Serbia


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sojournerbliss

    Beatrix, me too, I always like this one, en español, also - cada loca con su tema- Literally, it is something like 'each crazy person has their theme' correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sazidsyed

    In Bengali it is something like "যার যার, তার তার" meaning "His his, whose whose".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nelliza111

    In Ukrainian we have a verse by our most renowned philosopher - "Each city is entitled to the morales and rights of its own Each head has its own reason" Written in XVIII century. That was made into a song. BTW. He is on the biggest denomination of our currency. Thanks to all for the formidable discussion!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

    Are you talking about Grigory Skovoroda? Whoever the philosopher is, will you please write what he said украиньскою мовою (in Ukrainian)


    [deactivated user]

      In Turkish "herkesin zevki kendine"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karol_Gherard

      In Spanish: "Cada quien sus gustos" o "En gustos se rompen géneros".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poiuytl

      Jedem Tierchen sein Pläsierchen (says the tolerant German). To each little animal its own little pleasure.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelicitySpeed

      In UK I have never heard it in this order. Commonly Each to his own. To each sounds old fashioned and weird.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzzurroM

      Agreed! "Each to their (his, her, ones) own" is the only order i have heard it said in the UK. Was surprised to scroll through so many comments from British English speakers referering to 'to each his own" as their most commonly heard expression (not that i am saying they are wrong).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mert_oznkt

      In Turkish its "Herkesinki kendine"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      Google Translate says that means "everyone's self". Is that right?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      I think "everyone's to their self" would be a bit closer.

      herkes is everyone, herkesin is "everyone's" (before a noun), herkesinki is "everyone's" (standing alone -- like the difference between benim "my" and benimki "mine").

      kendi is "self" and the -e is the dative case: roughly, "to". (And the -n- is because Turkish doesn't like two vowels in a row.)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanhVanguard

      In vietnamese it is "Mỗi người một gu" or as the youth d say "Sống có chất"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohamadG.

      And in arabic (lebanese slang) كول على زوقك ولباس على زوق العالم


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceColdKelsicle

      Whatever floats your boat


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/newdawn3rd

      why in the multi choice they leave the "to" in French out but if you leave it out in the translation it is an error


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

      Because there are two equally correct versions of this phrase in French: À chacun ses goûts and Chacun ses goûts. The different exercises use different versions. So, it depend on which version you are to translate. Perhaps it should be reported as a problem.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeVawn

      Whats the litteral translation?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.P.Niers

      To each his tastes.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christina-10

      I cannot hear the "ses gouts"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

      I was given the male voice and I could hear everything except "gouts". However, when I put my phone right next to my ear I could hear "gouts" softly but clearly. The audio could definitely be improved.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rhonda181549

      In the US we say "one man's trash is another man's treasure".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

      I learned this in school as "chacun à son goût". Interesting


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelicitySpeed

      In uk To each his own is v v old fashioned. We have altered it to each to his own if used at all


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alora627483

      As a non-French-speaking child, I thought I learned this phrase as, À chacun son goût, not, ses goûts. Is the singular version used and/or correct?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.J.26

      In Portuguese it's like Romenian I guess: Gosto não se discute but we have also a more offensive expression: Gosto é que nem kul (I spelled it wrong on purpose), cada um tem o seu. I warn you guys to not use it in front of anyone unless it's a real buddy of you haha


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie589670

      In Scotland we say 'Each to his own taste' and in fact some people use the French expression 'chaque un à son gout' in the middle of a conversation in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EJNNJE

      I've always learned it as, "À chacun son goût."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      I recall being taught "À chaque son goût."


      [deactivated user]

        In Arabic it is

        لولا اختلاف الأذواق .. لبارت السلع فى الأسواق


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Basilious

        That's a colorful translation for a simple text. I would translate it as, "كل شخص و ما يحب" or "اختلاف الأذواق أمر طبيعي" or even "لكل ما يحبه".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shraddhasa3

        I get the meaning of it but the english translation sounds a bit off... I mean seriously how are we supposed to guess "To each his own"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

        It's a common English idiom. « À chacun ses goûts » means "To each (one) his/her/their tastes". It's only a tiny leap to get to "To each his own". You're also likely not to forget it now that you've got it wrong once.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eatstreats

        Another English version is 'horses for courses' or 'different horses, different courses'


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        No. "Horses for courses" means that everyone has their own talents and affinities. Like, not everyone can be a doctor or a teacher.

        "To each their own" means that everyone has their own tastes and preferences. Like, some people don't like pineapple on pizza and other people love it.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pbdvm

        In Greek: Περί ορέξεως κολοκυθόπιτα. (Considering taste: pumpkin pie. Which means that someone may like something so trivial as pumpkin pie.)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H.E.P.

        Why won't 'Tastes vary' do?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        The course contributors can't think of everything.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plouto1

        This is Tadi Fante version; "oye obiaa nna ne taste"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaelyn741885

        In Chinese, It's 萝卜白菜各有所爱。


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizapoppy888

        Surely its "each to his own?", or is this a variarion on the phrase?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        • 2796

        The standard version is "to each his own". "Each to his own" is a variant.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ro305bot

        Is it not "to each there own"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        • 2796

        To each their own.

        Their = belongs to them
        There = not here


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ata.Emir

        In Turkish we say: Zevkler ve renkler tartışılmaz. "The tastes and the colors can't be argued" (You can't argue about tastes and colors).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaHumourless

        To each THEIR own, surely.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        That is one possible translation, yes.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ABNQ0

        Each to his own, in England


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/billybone

        In Turkish zevkler ve renkler tartisilmaz meaning : The tastes and colours are not for discussion


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamChambe10

        in Hiberno English we say "everyone to his own taste"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liaronarias

        Cada quien con su cada cul y cada cual según su necesidad... Así deciamos con mis amigues!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujeebprayar

        In malayalam, an indian language we say ബഹുജനം പലവിധം(people differ, so is taste)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chantal586008

        I wish there had been more famous french idioms, like "il a le bon dos", meaning it's easy to blame, or something like that


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        There is nothing obscure about "à chacun ses goûts".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joaquina96

        In Argentina we also say "para gustos se hicieron los colores"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dolichotinae

        can this please be changed to “to each THEIR own", thank you.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tikvah_18

        In Portugal we say "gostos não se discutem", literally "there is no disputing about tastes", which is also the direct translation from the Latin "De gustibus non est disputandum".

        I think Brazilians say "gosto não se discute", the singular of the EU-PT expression, with the same meaning.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mj1531

        When I took French in middle school, I remember "To each his own" being "À chacun son tour." Is that correct?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timot50

        i checked in the web and it seems thatchacun son tour means `'wait your turn' or each in turn.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizeDumon

        I looked for this in the dictionary but it was given only as "À chacun sa vérité" Which of the two is the better one to use?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Basilious

        That is something you would read in a philosophical journal. "A chacun sa verite" means that everybody has their personal truth.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma448178

        The 'to' comes after the 'each' but the 'T' in 'to' is a capital in this question. That's not grammatically correct lol.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        • 2796

        To each his/their own is the most common way of saying it. There is nothing grammatically wrong with it. And odd capitalization is not grammar, it's spelling.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bel0902

        I know this as 'each to his own' though?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        • 2796

        That's a variation. The original is "to each his own" as in "each person gets his own tastes and preferences".

        There is nothing wrong with "each to his own", it implies the same thing, but it says that each person goes to their own tastes and preferences.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorJmz2507

        In spanish: "Cada quien con sus gustos" O "Sobre gustos no hay nada escrito"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto283955

        This phrase looks like it comes directly out of the concentration camp. This was the headline of the Buchenwald concentrstiin camp. Please substitute it with some other phrase!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanfnunes

        Cada um tem seu proprio gosto ptbr


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah737529

        The phrase is actually 'To each of his own'


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

        Maybe in some places. But "To each his own" is the phrase that I have always heard, and it is widely used. That gets almost 4,000,000 Google results, including the top one being an explanation of this meaning about tastes. "To each of his own" does get more hits for two reasons: 1) It is the title of a movie and an album so there are many results for those. 2) It occurs in normal sentence structure having nothing to do with this idiom such as "[Vonnegut] assigned a grade to each of his own books" or "... Grace that God shows to each of his own."

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