"He can barely walk."

Translation:Er kann kaum gehen.

February 26, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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Would "spazieren" work in this context?

February 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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Not quite. "spazieren" is more like "go for a stroll".

February 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MelvinCheung

What if ´gehen´ to be replaced by ´laufen´? Does it sound natural in German?

April 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/smudgeon

I went with "Ich kann kaum laufen" and lived to tell the tale ;)

April 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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Yes.

April 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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Thank you. It does seem more seldom used. (And "He can barely go for a stroll" seems unlikely.)

February 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/68flh
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It told me I should have used "spazieren".

November 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucid_kiwi

Why is "Er kann knapp gehen" wrong? "Knapp" appears as a suggested meaning.

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ACardAttack

Er kann kaum zu fuß gehen?

April 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilaria221101

Zu Fuß is unnecessary, because gehen implies already to go on foot, whereas fahren means to go with a means of transport(Ich gehe zur Schule, Ich fahre zur Schule mit dem Auto).

July 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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But, it is not technically wrong, is it? What if you wanted to emphasize that he is having trouble to walk - maybe he is injured - and he could go another way but not by foot?

May 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tincan17

I think the issue would be more with a meaning that isn't necessarily there being implied.

July 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sousquark
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The phrase leaves out the issue of why he can barely walk. Perhaps linked to an earlier phrase, though?:

Er trinkt aus der Flasche

July 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arlesgottheit

Why is ' er kann gehen kaum' wrong?

March 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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The adverb has to precede the infinitive.

March 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/TimDerks

I'm Dutch, and I live quite close to the German border, but I've never heard anyone use "gehen" to indicate the action of walking. I only hear it in sentences like "wir gehen nach...." or something like that. Wouldn't "Er mann kaum laufen" make a lot more sense?

June 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/surajramjee

why is it "gehen" and not "geht"?

April 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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You only conjugate the modal verb (können), not the main verb (gehen). It's the same in English. It's not "He can barely walks", but "He can barely walk".

April 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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Is the "noch" required in "Er kann gerade noch laufen"? I tried "Er kann gerade laufen" and got marked wrong.

June 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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Yes, it's necessary. Your sentence means "He can walk at the moment" or "He can walk in a straight line".

June 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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Alright, thanks!

June 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruben903805

Why is 'wandern' wrong?

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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That would mean "to wander" or "to roam". It would seem strange to say that in this context.

May 2, 2016
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