"Unaoza"

Translation:It is rotting

March 21, 2017

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cliff608306

Again, "unaoza" sounds to me like "you rot". Please explain to me, I am lost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasII

The "u-" prefix can mean the second person singular "you", as you noted.

However, it is also the subject prefix for singular "u/n" and "m/mi" class nouns. As something is rotting, it is not very likely to be a person, so it's assumed to be an object.

Example:

Mti unaoza - The tree is rotting

Unaoza - It is rotting


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leakielsholm

But would it be possible to say "mti anaoza"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the3lusive

No but you could say mti linaoza or mti inaoza.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsimonds

Jiti (very huge tree) linaoza. [No lesson on this yet]. Miti (trees) inaoza.

Those are the only ways I see to use "linaoza" and "inaoza" when talking about tree(s).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juryrigging

See my reply to the reverse sentence.

Prefixes (and object infixes) for the main non-M/Wa noun classes (relevant class in bold) are:

U- -------M/Mi, U/N
I- --------M/Mi, N/N
Li- -------Ji/Ma
Zi- -------N/N, U/N
Ki- -------Ki/Vi
Vi- -------Ki/Vi

If you come across pa-, ku- or m- they are part of the place classes of nouns. I've still not quite gotten a grasp of those. I think pa- is for specific locations, ku- is general and m- is inside a location, but I might have mixed them up. I don't think the prefix version of these are are really covered in this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brjaga
  • 2359

Strictly speaking, it can mean that, so that translation should be accepted. I don't really want to think too much, though, about a situation where you might need to use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae_Grey

Perhaps in a Tim Burton film? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/micmic54416

Yet it is literally true with some flesh-eating bacteria and something a doctor could say to a patient in such a case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s.rombaut

My dictionary says "-oza" means also to stink, so can this sentence aslo mean "you stink?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the3lusive

Yes metaphorically it would depend on context but if you want to say "you stink", that would be "unanuka"

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