https://www.duolingo.com/Serris1

[Suggestion] : Difference between European Spanish and Latin American Spanish course addition

As a european learning spanish, I've noticed that the spanish teached on Duolingo is mainly the Latin American one.

Would it be possible to ad a course highlighting the differences between the EU official spanish (as opposed to co-official, not claiming this is the "true and only" one) and LA spanish so that we can adapt to the country we visit ?

For exemple, the use of Ustedes or Vosotros depending on the country.

Why not some Galician / Catalan / Basque guidelines as well ?

1 year ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DuoFaber
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I think you're expecting too much from Duolingo. You can only learn the basics here - about 2500 words - and you'll have plenty of time to focus on the dialect of your choice afterwards (I like to watch Spanish tv, for example).

Also, there isn't just one Latin American dialect, each country is different. Here's a fun video about the different accents!

And finally, Galician is a language closer to Portuguese, Basque is a language isolate, and Catalan is also a different language, which you can learn on Duolingo if you already speak some Spanish: http://www.duolingo.com/course/ca/es/Learn-Catalan-Online

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BridgetEdd

I've been thinking about this as well, though I was hoping they could introduce the voseo. What if they introduced them as "Bonus Skills" like the idioms or flirting sections they have?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peztis
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That is exactly what I was going to propose!

As a married woman I am not that interested in the flirting bonus skill. :) Since I live in Spain, I would really like a bonus skill with the language differences, though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoNoEsImposible

Thanks for your post! This is an interesting topic that we all like to talk about. I would like to say a couple things about it =)

I've heard that if as a native English speaker in America, you can understand English speakers in Great Britain, than you can understand Spanish in Spain even if you live in, say, Costa Rica. Duolingo is an awesome way to start learning a language, but it can only teach up to a certain point. The most it mentions "vosotros" (as far as I know) is somewhere in the Conjugation tables of Basics 1 or Basics 2. So this is a decent idea, but Duolingo will probably not implement it as speakers in Spain will understand you fine.

I hope this helps you understand the case of things. Good luck learning Spanish! =)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnAxlPal

Actually, Im confused when I consult dictionaries. Because there are words which are used here but do not appear in the dictionary Im using.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
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try some other dictionaries. For context I like to check "linguee.com". Happy learning!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
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one small correction, if you don't mind: 'Teach' in past tense is 'taught'. The spanish taught on Duolingo is mainly Latin American Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

Neutral Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulorio1
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I am sorry but I do not agree. There is one Engish, one French, one Portuguese, one Spanish. Of course Australians, Scotchs and Americans speak a little different, as well as people from different regions of each idiom. Remember (or watch for the first time) the marvelous movie "My Fair Lady", in which a professor knew the differences between English speakers of England, according to the regions the lived, their social classes and their professions.

As for your need, I suggest you read books which authors live in the region you want to specialize and see TVs from that region.

By the way, in a presential beginners course I attended some years ago, the students were required to present a work in the last class. One made a small sketch in which three spanish speaking persons from three Latin american countries had communication problems because of the words they used for bus (camiĆ³n, guagua, bus) and glasses (antehojos, lentes, gafas)...

So Duolingo would have to build Mexican Spanish, Cuban Spanish, Argentinian Spanish and so on...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JensBu
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The Spanish taught on Duolingo is Mexican Spanish.

There is a Catalan tree. A separate Basque and Galician tree would be great. Galician for Portuguese and Catalan for Spanish speakers would match and therefore be ok as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

It's not Mexican Spanish. It's mainly neutral Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelHill6

What is "neutral spanish"? I would argue that "Neutral Spanish" is the Spanish from Madrid. Others may argue that it is Spanish from Buenos Aires or Mexico City.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
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I thought about the same thing since I'm learning Spain Spanish in school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristiina178261

A really good idea, at least vosotros should be added because it is very common in spain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

They don't care about Castilian. I've already tried. Probably because only Spain uses it.

That's why I bought Assimil and Colloquial Spanish, because I actually care about learning Castilian and not Latin American Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessePaedia
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The difference between the two is mainly the accent on a formal level. You can learn specific slang outside of Duolingo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
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Not only: there are differences in vocabulary as well. (Native Spanish speaker here)

1 year ago
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