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"Los zapatos ya están viejos."

Translation:The shoes are old already.

1
5 years ago

85 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bisade

Why is it 'ya están' rather than 'están ya' how do i decide how to order certain words in spanish?

30
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Word order confusing. I would have thought están would have gone before ya. Can someone explain?

15
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SFJuan

Here is a good article on the placement of adverbs in Spanish: http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/qt/adverbplaceqt.htm.

Generally, adverbs stay close to what they modify.

If the adverb modifies a verb, it generally comes after the verb: él trabaja lento (he works slowly) OR salgo ya (I'm leaving now). However adverbs come before the verb if they negate (no, nunca, jamás, etc) or to add emphasis: ¡qué lentos pasan los días! (the days go so slowly!). In this exercise, already seems to be emphatic (these shoes are old already), so ya is placed before the verb están.

39
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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I think in Spanish, the adverb comes before the verb.

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dadatic
dadaticPlus
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No, the adverb may come after the verb too. All these sentences sound natural to me:

“Los zapatos ya están viejos.”

“Los zapatos están ya viejos.”

“Los zapatos están viejos ya.”

The following sounds a little unnatural in spoken language, but wouldn’t look strange in a literary work:

“Ya los zapatos están viejos.”

2
Reply17 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomk123

"The shoes are old now" and "The shoes are old already" don't mean the same thing. The first just states a fact. The second indicates something unexpected, they shouldn't be worn out yet.

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kimplusplus

I put "The shoes already are old" How is this wrong?

6
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

That is awkward word order in English, I think. I would go with "are already old," though.

22
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BreannaRei

I think I wrote the same thing, but got it correct. Maybe it was a glitch.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reinhild

"The shoes are already old" is wrong also,and I lost another heart

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shraeye
shraeye
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This is accepted now.

10
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itsmeannib

why couldn't it be "the shoes are now old"?

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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accepted

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tango100

I don't understand "ya." What it means, when it's used.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SFJuan

I found this very helpful: http://nextlingo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/yatodavia.jpg

Essentially, ya indicates change, while todavía/aún indicate continuity. In this exercise, los zapatos ya están viejos, ya indicates the status of the shoes have changed. They didn't look old, but now they do. So, ya can translate to now or already. In the sentence, los zapatos ya no están nuevos, ya again indicates the status has changed. They looked new but now they don't. So, ya can translate to anymore or now.

¿Ya estás alli? Are you there yet? Did your status change from not being there to being there?

¿Todavía/aún estás allí? Are you still there? You were there and has your status remained the same?

13
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KoreLiz

I think we all need help on building (formation) sentences....like where we would put ya (middle, end, or where)...people need to stick to the subject at hand...quit rumbling about your personal business. ..we trying to learn Spanish people. ..let's get busy...

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Austin295239

How're you're feeling and where you are, use the verb estar!

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanBraddock

In the audio, ya sounds like 'dja' - is that right?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Yes. In Spain, the sound shoul be farther forward in the mouth than the English J, but the sound is the same in some regions, eg Mexico.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshaan96

How to use 'ya' Where to place it, starting or ending or somewhere else?!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gerbrich0

I am still confused about 'Ya'. Sometimes it is in the beginning of the sentence and now not. Can you also say: "Ya, los zapatos estan viejos'? Or is that just wrong?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shadowlurker_j

What's the reasoning for the position of ya? Does it always go before the verb?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwesomeHCForde

My teacher taught me something about estar. How you feel and where you are: this is when you use estar

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SirSwick

Those shoes are already old should also be accepted.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladyashiri
ladyashiri
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I don't think it should. DuoLingo teaches us to be very clear about what we're saying, and there are specific words for 'those' in Spanish, and they aren't in the sentence in this case. It really helped me understand exactly what I was reading/saying in Spanish, even more than when I took the classes in high school. I hope it does the same for you!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrixieSout

Why not the shoes are already old means the same in English

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
Amir.pro
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I think spanish is a very challenging language...

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Willow_Louise1

If the adverb modifies a verb, it generally comes after the verb: él trabaja lento (he works slowly) OR salgo ya (I'm leaving now). However adverbs come before the verb if they negate (no, nunca, jamás, etc) or to add emphasis: ¡qué lentos pasan los días! (the days go so slowly!). In this exercise, already seems to be emphatic (these shoes are old already), so ya is placed before the verb están.

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Willow_Louise1

my profesor gave me a tip about estar, when I'm not sure. estar + adjective : if I can change estar by for exemple, : estar cansado/ by I feel tired, it's estar, also : estoy enfadado/I'm angry, by I feel angry, it's estar.sorry I don't have enough vocabulary in English to explain that rule

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barrynelson

the shoes by now are old. wrong, why?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladyashiri
ladyashiri
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The "by now" sounds like a "good probability" that they're old now (to me). The sentence in the example sounds more certain/straightforward to me. "They are old already, period"

0
Reply3 years ago