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https://www.duolingo.com/AbdulMajeedBR

How useful has Esperanto been in your daily life?

AbdulMajeedBR
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Apart from browsing through different online forums and Facebook posts in the Duolingo group (or chit chatting on Telegram), how would you say Esperanto is contributing to your life?

1 year ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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There have been lots of posts like this before that you can search for, just in case you don't get a lot of responses.

I'm a Latin teacher, so it's been helpful to me in ways that might be quite different from others. I like to study etymology and language structure. Esperanto has provided lots of opportunities for me to explore word origins. This has helped me tie together the Romance languages I'm studying and with a smattering of German as the icing on my proverbial cake.

Learning a language also helps me relate to the learners in my own class. For the first four years of my teaching I had to focus on developing my own teaching methods. When I was secure enough to return to learning languages it helped ground me greatly.

I've made a few friends already. One has been helping me with my German, another is a local historian that has shared lot of fascinating information.

Of course, I could get any of these things by learning another language, but that's not the point. I like to keep my colesterol down by trail running. A friend told me I was being silly, that I could get the same benefit running on a track at my local park. But why shouldn't I enjoy what I'm doing?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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It's fun to read DanD8's reply because I find myself tempted to start out by saying that Esperanto has been helpful to me in ways which may be different it has been for others. Many of my reasons are the same as his - a deeper understanding of English and international word roots and etymology, the ability to use knowledge gained in Esperanto to teach other subjects... that sort of thing.

With the notable exception of DaveRutan, I have been at this much longer than the other people commenting. There has been plenty of time for my perspective on this question to develop and change. If also had plenty of opportunities for unique experiences which would not have been possible without Esperanto. One that springs to mind was to see my son playing (and talking) with a Hungarian boy... in France, even though my son doesn't speak Hungarian and the other boy didn't speak English ... and neither speaks French ... and the didn't see anything odd about this.

I try to answer this question in my #EsperantoLives videos. There are two in this playlist.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xP9eTytD7olist=PLl5PRFz0DHxZOjtnAayfNiZ20jAUv-B8H

The other thing that makes my situation a little bit atypical is that while Esperanto has always been "more than a hobby" for me, it's starting to become more like a part time job. In addition, my experiences tutoring Esperanto have encouraged me to tutor other subjects, and over the next few months I'm going to be looking for more opportunities to teach, which I would like to do full time - so Esperanto is influencing my career choices.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

I'd say it's a part of my identity. It's one of the languages I speak and use in everyday life with my beloved ones. It's the language of my global circle of friends. It's the language I am podcasting in, it's the language I write songs in, it's one of the languages I think and dream in.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveRutan
DaveRutan
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I enjoy being able to express myself bilingually. PLus, on the Esperanto side it can be somewhat of a mind-bending puzzle to figure out how to talk about some of my interests, woodworking and lutherie among them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZofiC
ZofiC
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I know everything in Spanish class now. Just kidding, but it's super helpful to already know Esperanto.

Because of what I've learned of Esperanto's grammar, I understand English grammar way better now. I understand how all the participles work and how even English grammar can be broken into more basic components.

I'm still in school and whatnot, but even for an adult who's not having to sit through Spanish class or analyze sentence structure on a daily basis, it's cool to look at other languages and break them up to fit into the basic framework that Esperanto has.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StrangaStrigo

Well, I work in customer service and I like being able to mutter annoyed thoughts under my breath in another language is nice. It's just a little blowing off steam about trivial things so no one else needs to hear it anyway. Knowing it genuinely won't be understood makes it work better.

Mostly I've noticed since starting, my general memory has been improving. Everything gets more amusing as I silently pronounce it as an Esperanto word then seek out a translation.

I've always loved words and have a small collection of dictionaries and encyclopedias on a variety of subjects. I'll be adding an Esperanto section when I get a chance. As with many others, etymology is a long-standing hobby so the whole language is just delightful.

Going through the lessons, even just reviewing keep the tree gilded has managed to serve as stress relief during a trying time. I'm not progressing as fast as I could but learning words relevant to daily life has gone a long way. All those conversations, come-backs and hypothetical situations that never seem to stop playing in my head take on an actual level of satisfaction as I am able to go through them in Esperanto rather than English.

The only disappointment is I don't have anyone to really talk to for practice but as I get further in I'll be able to write stories and characters talking will be close enough.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pdbpoet

Learning Esperanto is giving me an insight into my own language, e.g. the derivation of words. It's also exercising my brain. There's also some evidence that having a second language can improve cognitive function following a stroke/brain injury, so it's probably worthwhile as a back-up. And who knows where it could lead in the future.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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I have friends I made through Esperanto.

At least one of them I would not have been able to talk to if I had not learned Esperanto. I think that's a pretty useful thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdroege

I am a retired German teacher. I believe that the freedom to just blather out in Esperanto drastically improved my German. As an Esperantist, I feel free to make mistakes and correct other people. When I am in Germany, I am extremely good, but I am NOT a German!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jepkatoj
Jepkatoj
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For me, it's been confidence and a step-up in learning other languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph
Kliphph
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My understanding of the etymology of words is mainly due to my study of Esperanto. To give an example of practical applications of knowing etymology , I often go to lectures and discussions of a political nature on university campuses, where people tend to resort to using overly academic lingo in English and French (which tends to be non inclusive to activists coming from non academic backgrounds), and being able to break down the individual components of the terms used allows for comprehension without a degree in the topic being discussed.

I've had an Esperantist flat-mate in the past when I lived in Barcelona, so I was able to speak it on a daily basis (even though I was a beginner and they were fluent), although we conversed more frequently in Spanish or English, due to not wanting to exclude other people in group conversations.

Even though I do not have someone to speak it with on a daily basis presently, I still enjoy the ability to engage in cultural aspects of Esperanto, such as watching Esperanto videos on Youtube, or listening to music in Esperanto, or going to local meetups with other Esperantists.

1 year ago