"La fattoria"

Translation:The farm

March 12, 2014

18 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/italikaren

Wouldn't "factory" be a definition of "fattoria"? Just curious


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biomax

No. "Fattoria" is a tract of land cultivated for the purpose of agricultural production and/or tract of land devoted to the raising and breeding of domestic animals. The right translation is "Farm"

"Factory" is a building in which goods are manufactured; a plant. The right translation is "fabbrica".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

It's like the word "camera". You'd think it meant, well, camera. But it actually means room. The reason for this, I believe, is that the English word camera comes from the Latin for "chamber", because a camera is a chamber that lets in only focused light.

The translation for camera is "macchina fotografica" or "telecamera".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itastudent

They are called "false friends" or "falsi amici".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

That's it! In Portuguese, chamber is "câmara", and for some time, cameras were called "câmara" or "câmara escura" (dark chamber). Now it's "câmera".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judy.scholar

Possibly it comes from the Arabic Qumrah, since the pinhole camera seems to have been invented by that great Muslim scientist and expert in optics, al Hasan ibn al Haytham.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JungleJenn

I wouldn’t be surprised, there are 4000 words in latín languages derived from Arabic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biomax

My dictionary says camera comes from the greek word "kamara" (accent on the middle "a") which meant "vault" and later "vaulted chamber". Then the word "camera" was used as a short form for latin "camera obscura".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Very interesting.

Fattoria seems to come from "fatto/fare".
In Portuguese, "fazenda" (farm too) seems to come from "faz/fazer".

Fazer = fare.

Seems to be a place (at least in old times) where things are "done/made".

Probaly the same thought applies to the word "factory", but nowadays, things are done in a more technological way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JungleJenn

Also directly related to Spanish: hacienda (farm) from hacer ‘to do’ -

An ‘h’ in Spanish often substituted for ‘f’ in Portuguese (and other latín languores - or vice versa) e.g. hijo - filho - figlio - fille - OR higo - figo - fico - figue -

Often denotes Arabic roots


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oceanotti

You've saved my day so many times, Danmoller! Have a lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suntype

A bit unrelated but adding to the confusion, Spanish uses both "factoría" and "fábrica" to mean factory, and "granja" to mean farm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elon_the_Hittite

And even better to remember: goods are fabricated in a 'fabbrica'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarenColle

Is this word fattoria an example of a 'false friend', mukkapazza? Sure fooled me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul604

Yes me too. My initial reaction was, yay a word I don't actually need to translate! Ooops....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-muktar

Fattoria means farm while a farmer is a "contadino" lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/obitonye

And farmer is not fattorino

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