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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deniime

Drikker, Drikke or Drikk?

Could anyone explain to me when to use Drikke, Drikker and Drikk?

For example if i am to say, you have a drink would it be, "du har en drikk" or " du har en drikke" if so why?

March 26, 2017

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannahviolinist

"Du har en drikk" mean "you have a drink. "Å drikke" means "to drink." "Drikker" means "am/are/is drinking" or "do drink." So "drikk is the noun, "drikke" is a verb, and "drikker" is a present participle (a more specific verb). Hope this helps! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 64

'drikke' can also be a noun in some cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hamid306611

i think the problem is here. what is the difference between drik and drikke when they are those used as a noun meaning drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoopher

Small correction: "drikker" is the present tense form of "å drikke". It is not the present participle, which is "drikkende" (and which you probably haven't got to yet).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mandiras

Drikker translates to either 'drink(s)' or 'am/are/is drinking', since Norwegian has no continuous tense. The present participle in English is used without 'to be' if I am not mistaken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannahviolinist

I think the confusion is caused by English being so confusing. In English, adding a "to" in front of a word makes it an infinitive phrase and "be" is just a helping or linking verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deniime

Oh now i understand thankyou!

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