"Él conoce a mucha gente."

Translation:He knows a lot of people.

4 years ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/adahad26

Why is the a needed here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
  • 25
  • 14
  • 3
  • 2033

I guess it is the "personal a". The direct object of the setence is a person or pet/animal. That forces the need for the "a".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adahad26

Okay. Btw congratulations on your streak!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
  • 16
  • 12
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 102

I was nearly there a month ago, but then I had a camping meet over the weekend, and I lost it... Never again!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vlastaris

Cool, 1036 day streak for Rocko

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
  • 16
  • 12
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 102

Now about 1500

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan260336

Now 1842

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WonderWheeler

Omg...I thought I was doing good with 18 days, lol

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
  • 25
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 196

It's the personal a ... can be used for emphasis or to personify objects (pets, your hometown, etc.) I find the bowdoin.edu website very helpful. Here's their page on "personal a" http://www.bowdoin.edu/~eyepes/newgr/ats/21.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tenet
tenet
  • 24
  • 9
  • 2

thanks for the web link

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspbrryswirl

what is the difference between saber and conocer?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrsVieceli

Saber is know facts and information. Conocer is used to express familiarity or first hand experience. Almost always use conocer with people. Also, the personal a is a dead giveaway that conocer will be used. Saber cannot use a personal a

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kiltown
kiltown
  • 25
  • 12
  • 8
  • 4

That's a tip I have not come across before, thanks for same. ( I'm referring to "saber cannot use a personal a")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Thanks for that. I don't recall seeing this explained prior to this page.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

To my (still-learning) understanding, "saber" indicates knowledge of facts while "conocer" indicates acquaintance or familiarity with someone or something.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngeIo

I like to think of it as the difference between knowing and recognizing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

To my understanding, "muchas" is typically used for countable nouns, like "many," and "mucha" is used for non-countable nouns, like "much."

Since the internet seems to agree with Duolingo's translation, the best I can do to reconcile it is that "gente" is a non-countable noun, despite that in English we consider our word for the same thing ("people") to be countable. Still, if anyone can shed more light on this, I'd be pleased.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
  • 25
  • 21
  • 316

Gente is singular. You have la gente and NOT las gentes. Thus mucha and not muchas.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

I appreciate the response, but this doesn't quite seem to clarify things.

If "gente" is singular, then it shouldn't translate to "people," which is plural. This is why I was suspecting that "gente" was neither singular nor plural, but rather what is known as "non-countable."

To be thorough, "people" can be used in a singular sense if it's referring to "a people" like "a tribe"—e.g. "the island was inhabited by several different peoples, rather than just one people"—however, that is certainly not the sense in which "gente" is being used above: "a lot of people"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
  • 25
  • 21
  • 316

It's similar in essence to the below sentences in English.

  • The class is in full attendance.
  • The police is here.
  • The crowd is boisterous.

All of these are talking of more than one but use the singular form.

If the sentence had used personas instead, it would have been muchas personas.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

UPDATE: I explored and found many definitions of "gente," including "plural of person" and literally "personas (people)," as well as rare examples of it being pluralized as "gentes" — http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/gente

As usual, it seems context is important, and the grammar is simply not equivalent.

I also glanced back over and realized you meant "the class," not "attendance." In that case, minus your "police" example, what you're suggesting is consistent; "the class," like "the crowd" is singular, because there can be "a class/crowd" and there can be "many classes/crowds."

However, this certainly isn't how DL is using "gente" here; if it was, then we could substitute "crowd/class" for "people": "He knows a lot of crowd/class."

Sorry to be so pedantic; I think I can accept that there is no grammatical equivalent to this use of "gente," in English, though the countable plural "people" is CLOSEST. : )

Again, thanks for the effort!

ORIGINAL: I do appreciate the effort, but all three of these examples are different and one of them is incorrect grammar.

  • "Attendance" is not singular because it cannot be plural; it is a "non-countable" noun. (Closest to the way I suggested "gente" might be treated in my original comment.)

  • "The police," like "people," is plural; "the police are here" is correct English grammar, just as "the people are here" is. (You could say "the police squad is here" if you want it to be singular.)

  • "The crowd" is countable singular because there can be more than one crowd to be counted.

Anyway, I didn't mean to start a grammar debate. My impression is that "gente" is simply a non-countable Spanish noun meaning basically the same thing as the countable (plural) English "people." I'm okay with this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
  • 25
  • 21
  • 316

The police, where I come from, often denotes the police force. Not a big deal. I was just trying to illustrate collective nouns are often treated as singular. But like you mentioned, depending on context it can be singular or plural (or even depending on BrE/AmE).

One thing I notice you trying here is checking whether it should be singular or plural based on English version - people for gente in this case. This may not always work as Spanish may have its own convention. For example, we always say the pants while in Spanish we have both la pantalón and los pantalones.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabxcas

I put "he knows a lot of persons"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReubenO.
ReubenO.
  • 20
  • 9
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

That is also incorrect English. "He knows a lot of PEOPLE" would be better. ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Or He knows many people.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielGarr830049

"Persons" is correct, just a bit archaic.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmberJohns50964

"he knows of a lot of people"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nurseryman4

" a lot" and "alot" are commonly used incorrectly, --A lot is a plot of land --Alot is not a word. The correct translation should be "He knows many people"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

That definition of a "lot" is seventh in a long list of various meanings, here: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lot

Many (a lot) of those definitions work perfectly as substitutes for "many."

You're absolutely correct about "alot," however.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikepedrosa

porque no puede " much of the people "? explica por favor!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itzmeeekarina

Why no he knows of many people?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Conocer means "to be acquainted with," not "to know about/of."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zschwab

That's odd... when I hover over the sentence, it tells me "conocer" means "knows of". So that's incorrect?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

The "definitions" on hover are not always contextually aware. The problem we're running into here is that English and Spanish are different languages, and corresponding words only approximately substitute for each other.

I suspect that if you ask a native Spanish speaker how they would differentiate "he knows many people" and "he knows of many people," they'd answer with two different sentences. This is despite the fact that "conocer" in a certain context could mean "knows of."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zschwab

Ah, thanks. I'm also a little less than clear on the distinction being drawn between the English phrases "knows of..." and "is acquainted with..." You're saying that "conocer" means that the person has actually/physically met these other people - is that right? I.e., is that why "he knows of many people" is an incorrect translation?

Even still, the difference feels vague to me. To "know of" and to "be acquainted with" someone imply pretty much the same thing in my mind - a superficial but non-zero level of knowledge. If someone told me she "knew of" my brother, and I later found out they'd physically met once at a party, I wouldn't be surprised or feel lied to.

It's interesting that Spanish speakers would differentiate between two English sentences (he knows of vs. he knows many people), when I think most English speakers would treat them as synonymous, in the absence of any accompanying context (perhaps "knows of" is a bit more formal?).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

I think you had things spot on in your first paragraph.

I can know of your brother without having met him—without therefor being acquainted with him. I find the distinction between these two concepts very useful for communicating, and therefor find the ability to distinguish them in Spanish equally useful.

Also, regarding your example: in order to "be acquainted with" someone, I necessarily have to "know of" them, but the inverse is not true. It's squares and rectangles.

Anyway, I would be surprised if most English speakers would not draw a clear distinction between "knows of" and "is aquainted with," but I guess we'd have to conduct a social study to settle that one. ; )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tuffflove

Why not "muchas personas?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpurda
kpurda
  • 11
  • 9
  • 2

I put "ppl" out of laziness and got it wrong... okay then, be like that!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeastmodeK101

why not El conoce a muchas personas?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sansan858784

Isn't "hace" also means "know"? What's the difference?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reyna.Zulema

I love this app

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nabinpoude2

to meet is also conocer and to know is also conocer. so don't they get confused?????

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anniescott3

Why is "a good many" not considered "a lot"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yogeshbatra

best way to remember conoce try to speak know with k

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dustin710295

can "sabe" be use instead of "conoce" if nessary?

6 months ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.