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  5. "Ele terá perdido o casaco."

"Ele terá perdido o casaco."

Translation:He will have lost the coat.

February 26, 2013

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delvi
  • 1079

Would it be correct to translate this as "He will have lost his coat"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeiaSala

Is there even such a future perfect form in English? I have never heard or seen it before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

By the time the election takes place in November, Clinton will have campaigned nonstop for decades.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duofus

Sometimes tera is translated as may, sometimes will. In this sentence is ut OK to say "he may have lost the coat " ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delvi
  • 1079

Sorry, you have a typo in your sentence. I am not sure if you are saying it is acceptable or not. "... sentence is UT OK to say....."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duofus

is it OK to say :) I am losing a lot of points just because of typos by the way. ıs it OK to say he may have lost his coat here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

I can't remember sentences where "terá" means "may", except for some expressions like: "o que terá acontecido"? (what could/may have happened?)

Which seems not the best tense, but it's a very common expression, along with these others having the same meaning:

  • O que terá acontecido?
  • O que pode ter acontecido?
  • O que teria acontecido?
  • O que será que aconteceu?

I'd take all these as exceptions in rules, except for "o que pode ter acontecido?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafagdn

It's odd. Would sound better in another context, ex.: "he will have lost the test, if he is late" or something like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt787268

Yeah, exactly. " he will have lost the coat", while maybe grammatically correct, is very weird. Unless you are a psychic predicting the future


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pvelikova

It has probably been discussed somewhere else, but I keep wondering what is the difference between casaco and agasalho? I remember they both were translated as "coat"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nagelralf

without any context " he will have missed the coat" could it be right?

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