"Faça o que eu digo, não faça o que faço."

Translation:Do what I say, not what I do.

March 12, 2014

21 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ixtoh

"Do as I say, do not do as I do" is technically, word by word, more accurate than the definition given by Duolingo. It was not accepted.


[deactivated user]

    Actually I think the English translation "do as I say, not as I do" is perfectly correct, but I wonder why it is marked as incorrect when the second personal pronoun "eu" is included...?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

    Do as I say, don't do what I do. Is not accepted. oh well


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lexflex

    It's accepted now


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cede1945

    What is wrong with "Do what I say, do not what I do"? "Do what I say, not what I do" is accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

    There is a missing "do" in yours. It needs to be, "...do not do what I do", which, in the end is a bit of an awkward mouthful.

    And the idiom in English is almost as standard as the one in Portuguese.

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/do_as_I_say_and_not_as_I_do

    Using "what" instead of "as" is a popular modern alternative (and happens to be almost exactly the translation of the Portuguese on top of it).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrannySlasher

    Why is it "digo" instead 'dizer', and "faço" instead of 'fazer'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    Because this is a true statement in present tense. If you used future tense, that would be:

    "Faça o que eu disser, não faça o que eu fizer".

    Anyway, this is a fixed expression: Faço o que eu digo, (mas) não faça o que eu faço.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sue64584.

    Faça o que eu digo, não faça o que faço. - Do as I say, do not do what I do.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duofus

    I did not understand the structure. Need some help :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

    Faça = imperative
    o que = what
    eu digo = I say
    eu faço = I do

    Literally: "Do what I say, but don't do what I do"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnGrunewald

    I actually had this right, but Duo didn't like my exact definition. First I typed in the English idiom and then changed it to the literal translation (as you have above), which apparently was wrong. I will report it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    This is a common saying in Portuguese:

    • "faça o que eu digo, mas não faça o que eu faço"

    But the literal translation from English is "faça como eu digo, não como eu faço".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duofus

    Oh. Thanks a lot. Still learning :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eglimp

    not getting the structure either, why is this 'faça' and not 'faz' ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    Faz is also right, it is imperative too. But as it is an expression, it has fixed words, so we use only faça most of the time.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eglimp

    Thanks... so the imperative is conjugated according to number of people? venha/vem for instance? and -os for 'let's --' ??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    Exactly. Venha/vem are the same since they are the conjugations for tu and você (referring to the second person). But there are the plural form too.

    Let's + verb = vamos + infinitive.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eglimp

    Muito obrigada - lentamente, vejo a luz.... (??)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antlane

    TU- indicative present: eu venho, tu vens... vens - s = vem -imperative: Vem tu; // VOCÊ - subjuntive present: talvez eu venha, talvez tu venhas, talvez ele/você venha - imperative: venha você.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrisKalis

    It marked me correct even though I omitted the second faca - Faca o que eu digo, nao o que faco.....is it okay to drop the faca in the second part of the sentence?

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