"Bonne nuit à ceux qui sont ici."

Translation:Good night to those who are here.

February 26, 2013

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pancen

I think "Good night to everyone here" should be accepted as correct.

April 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oskalingo

Agreed. And also my variant 'Good night to everyone who's here'

January 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p2g2g

I have failed this question every single time: How do I hear the difference on "ceux" vs "ce/ces"?

February 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avistew

"ce" and "ceux" are pronounced the same. However, "ce" is singular and "ceux" is plural, so context should help on that ("sont" is plural).

"Ces" means "these", and is always followed by a noun ("these people", etc), so if there is no noun after it, it cannot be "ces". The pronunciation is also different (close to "say"), compared to the other two.

February 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaitteKat

Are you sure ce and ceux have the same pronunciation? Google Translate pronounces them differently and even on Duolingo they seem to be pronounced differently.

December 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mere_des_chats

The correct way to pronounce ceux is by saying [say] while round you lips into an "oh"-sound shape.

Ce on the hand is shorter and sounds like [suh] or just the "s" sound: ce garçon" would sound like [s'gaRso(ng')] where (ng') stands for nasalization of the last syllable.

Ces sounds like [say]--or like [sayz] if followed by a word starting with a vowel : ces animaux [sayzaneemo].

January 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mydogrocks05

they are pronounced differently but barely so its not that noticeable

July 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FionaFrank

They don't have the same pronunciation. Ceux has a longer vowel sound, while ce is much shorter.

March 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpiXy

Why isn't "good night to those who're here" accepted ? Really, cause of <Who are> and <Who're> ?!? Kiddin me right duo ?

July 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanMontauk

who're is not English. Some contractions are acceptable and others just aren't.

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/driusan

Who're is a perfectly valid contraction. It might not be the most common one in the world (which is probably why no one reported it), but it's certainly valid English.

October 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanMontauk

You are right. I don't remember ever seeing it in print, but now that I think of it, I have heard it used. Maybe even done it myself.

October 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thebaum1113

right, but it is more slang than it is an english word. contactions in english are used a lot as slang rather than proper english, because it makes sentences shorter and we can get more information out quicker. so it is english, just not proper, when duo uses proper english with little wiggle room for some slang, "Who're" is not proper. :-)

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaitteKat

It's grammatically correct and much closer to what I think most people would say when they are not trying to pronounce their words exactly correct.

I would personally pronounced whore and who're differently. I pronounce who're like "who-er" and whore like you would expect.

December 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avistew

I assume that's why, since I had never come across "who're" before. They probably didn't think to include it in the list of accepted contractions. They might add it if you report it.

July 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pfeil

Couldn't it be "good evening"?

February 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacobras

No, "bonsoir" means good evening. So then it would be either: "Bonsoir à ceux [..]" or "Bonne soirée à ceux [..]". Not sure which one.

February 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/temia28

"Bonne soirée" would be used when the evening is not over, for example when you talk to someone who is on the way to a party, instead of saying goodbye or anything like that, you can wish him a "bonne soirée"

June 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avistew

Generally, the one-word forms are equivalent of "hi", and the two-word forms are equivalent of "bye". So "Bonjour" vs "Bonne journée" and "Bonsoir" vs "Bonne soirée".

Bonne nuit always means "good night" and is used to mean "have a good sleep" or that kind of thing, not like in English when you can tell people to have a good night, even though they're going to a party for instance, not going to bed.

November 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolustheo

is it problem to say "good night for the ones who are here" ? too sensitive =_=

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Youbee

Yes it does not soimd roght in english. You say good night to someone

February 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunketInga

What is the difference between 'ceux' and 'ceux-la'

August 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avistew

"Ceux-là" stands on its own, so you can't use it with "qui" afterwards, while you can with "ceux". And you can't use "ceux" on its own, you need something to go with it.

August 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig

What's wrong with "Good night to those present"?

February 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mere_des_chats

Well, I suppose DL didn't want you ignoring qui sont and the word "present" just means "at a certain place"...not necessarily here. I could say to someone who was attending a wedding overseas over the phone, "Did all the siblings of the bride show up? Well, say hi to those present." That means those there overseas, not here where I am. So translating ici to here is more accurate.

February 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacobthedrummer

Why is is ceux and not celles, seeings how the speaker is asking about people, and "personnes" is feminine?

February 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mere_des_chats

When you are referring to a mixture of sexes, the masculine word is what you use. Ils arrivent could mean both men and women arrive or just men arrive. I suppose iit is the sam. With ceux. You would use celles if all the people were female.

You cannot confuse the gender of words with what they stand for. Personne(s) may be a feminine word but men are people too. If you were talking about a group of people who happen to be men (or even men and women) eating and drinking you can say "les personnes mangent et ils boivent du vin*.

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pigslew

But not to the others.

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelGre316713

Good night to all here should be accepted i think

April 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mere_des_chats

I think "goodnight to all who are here" would work if the original sentence had been "bonne nuit à tout qui sont ici".

April 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klara1019

How about "Good night, everyone"?

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mere_des_chats

That would be bonne nuit tout le monde, This exercise was saying goodnight not to everyone (in the world?) but only those wh were present.

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikenAroya1

What's the different between ici and là

January 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoubleLingot

ici is here and là is there

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/obonekenobe

all of you who are here?

May 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mere_des_chats

Bonne nuit à vous tous qui êtes ici I believe is how you would say that.

May 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cricri811231

good night to them who are here, is not correct !

September 26, 2018
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