"Bues i i ffwrdd am bythefnos."

Translation:I was away for a fortnight.

April 1, 2017

8 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob116157

Is there a subtle difference in the use of bues i and ro’n i. Bues i yn Ffrainc am fis neu Ro’n i yn Ffrainc am fis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas318777

From what I've read in a similar discussion to this one, “bues” is preferred for something that's completely in the past, with a definite end-time.

In another exercise, we had “Ro'n i'n [arfer] bwyta pannas gydag Owen”; and if I'm understanding this correctly, “ro'n” is used there (rather than “bues”) because the speaker doesn't mention any exact start-date or end-date — it's just indeterminately in the past (and perhaps might resume in the future).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doshia2

"On the road" in English means travelling as opposed to just going someplace else and being "away". Is "i ffwrdd" similarly non-specific? Diolch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieJeste

I was wondering the same thing. My best guess is "yn y ffwrdd" is "on the road" (traveling) and "i ffwrdd" is "away." Can anyone confirm this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

i ffwrdd is simply 'away', as shown.

ffordd - a road


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randybvain

Ers achau = for ages, am bythefnos = for two weeks. Are ers and am exchangeable or restricted to some expressions or contexts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcode
Mod
Plus
  • 2690

'Ers' is better translated as 'since' so the expression 'Ers achau' is literally 'Since ages' which is transposed to 'for ages' in English.

So 'ers pythefnos' would be 'since a fortnight'

While 'am bythefnos' would be 'for (a period of) a fortnight'

Learn Welsh in just 5 minutes a day. For free.