https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Input on country terminology from native English speakers required!

devalanteriel
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I'm just seeking some input on whether you would use these terms synonymously, in some contexts, or if you would not.

The terms are "country", "nation", and "land".

What I need is some basic data on how natives actually use the terms. I know the dictionary definitions, so please don't explain what they mean or how you think they should be used. :)

Also please don't reply if you're not actually a native English speaker, regardless of how good your English is. Your input is valuable and we love you - just not for this thread. Thanks for understanding!

1 year ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LupoMikti
LupoMikti
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Native English speaker of US English (West Coast, specifically Northern California Central Valley)

I use country and nation interchangeably, but I have to say that in the most common and casual of conversations I would almost always use country exclusively. It would take me some time to figure out what situations I use nation in and I think the fact that I can't think of any off the top of my head speaks to how infrequently I use it. Perhaps the use of nation for me must be prefaced by a phrase that uses the word too? Like talking about the United Nations, I think I'm more likely to say nation than I am country but would also soon start using country instead of nation just for some variety.

As for land, this only really sounds like a poetic or literary use when it's to mean country. I don't think I'd ever use land to mean country naturally, it would always be an intentional use to sound formal or archaic. I can only think of the compound word homeland as a word involving land as country or nation.

Edit: Very interesting that not using land as country could be dependent on how agrarian the culture of where you live is. This makes sense for the Central Valley of California too as we have a lot of farmland.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamontsson
Lamontsson
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Australian: So, I would use:

  • country to mean the official designation of that place (e.g. Sweden and all its provinces etc. such as Gottland), but then I would also use 'country' to mean places that aren't the cities. This is particularly common in Australia (I know the other English speaking countries do it too) but in Australia, the 'country' has quite a specific look and feel to it. Note that in Australia, the DESERT is NOT considered the country. That's the Red Centre or possibly the Outback. The country refers to places that are a brownish green, with a lot of trees, not places like Uluru which is red and sandy.

  • nation, I would use to represent the people in that country. For example, "Sweden, as a nation, seems to consider themselves open to..." (or whatever). For example, I would never say "He is travelling to the nation of Georgia." - I would say "He is travelling to Georgia, the country, not the southern US state." - Because you can't travel to a group of people (you can of course, but grammatically, I would think of someone as going to the country.)

  • land. Hm, tricky. Land for me, can mean anything from the physical description of something that isn't water, all the way up to and including things bigger than the country, e.g. almost an entire continent. As some have already said, it's a poetic thing yes, and in that setting it can be interchangeable with 'country'. e.g. The Glugs of Gosh by CJ Dennis: "If 'tis to serve my native land, then on Monday I shall be at hand!" (He is talking about doing something for his country, called Gosh) but in that same poem, "land" is used to mean "a place": "Catch the four thirty, your ticket in hand punched by the porter who broods in his box, Journey afar to a sad soggy land, wearing your shot silk lavender socks." In this setting, the author doesn't mean go to another country, he just means, go somewhere that is "afar". But then, say I'd come back from Scandinavia and someone said "What was it like?" - I could conceivably say "It's a strange land." and when they said, "What, Norway?" I might say "Well, all of it." So in that, I could be lumping Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland together. It's a bit of a far fetched example, but you could conceivably do that for a whole continent, if you were to brand the whole continent with one description, e.g. "South America is a beautiful land." But then you can also go quite small with it of course, like "That land he bought is worthless, nothing grows there, or on any of the land for about 500km around it." OK so there we are talking about real estate, but in the "any of the land 500km around it", we're just talking about 'land' in general.

I deliberately DIDN'T check the dictionary on this, but I -think- that how I use them should be pretty well in line with that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

Very interesting. Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StarMachinery

I'm also Australian and I agree with the above. I would add that "country" referring to somewhere not in the city is always "THE country", e.g. "I'm going on holiday to the country".

There is also a term used here "welcome to country" which refers to a specific ceremonial welcome/greeting announcement acknowledging the traditional aboriginal owners of the land, and I believe has its roots in Australian aboriginal culture.

As well as the above, "nation" is a formal version of "country", used in formal contexts to denote (or bring to prominence) the political entity of a country.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seanchai35

Native speaker of US English (Midwest and South):

In casual conversation, "country" and "nation" tend to be used interchangeably in most parts of the US in which I've lived. "Country" is usually a little more common than "nation" in daily conversation.

"Land" is not commonly used to mean the same thing, except in compound words, e.g. homeland, fatherland (in which case it is synonymous). Otherwise, "land" is more commonly used as a common noun, e.g. "His family owns a lot of land."

In political or newscast type environments (or university classes on either one), the dictionary definitions are used... my political science professor would have had something to say about it if I had mixed up "nation" and "country" in class!

As always, other English dialects may treat these words differently.

(Edited to add): Interesting that the South Atlantic states use "land" and "nation" interchangeably but not "country" and "nation", as is true in my experience. However, I'd like to take a stab (make a guess) as to why this might be so. Large parts of the Midwestern and Southern US, including the parts I'm from, are (or were) agrarian in nature (farmland). So it makes sense that in those areas of the US, "land" is more likely to refer to physical land that you own, farm, would like to own, etc, unless it features in a compound word like "homeland".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susanstory
susanstory
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Native English speaker from Alberta, Canada.

For country, I would say Canada is a country and also a nation. We also have in our national anthem, "Our home and native land". Oh yeah, there is a song, "This land is your land. This land is my land, From Bonavista, to Vancouver Island, From the Arctic Circle to the Great Lake Waters, This land was made for you and me." "Land" here means "Canada" I've heard that song sung in Ukrainian too.

"nation" is also used when talking about the native people, such as "the Cree nation" but for that it's not talking about a country, but a nation of people. Oh yeah, the native people like to speak about "the land". When they say "the land" they mean land, not a country. When they say "nation" they mean their people, and I guess by "country" they would have to mean "Canada".

When talking about other countries, I would probably call them "countries", not lands or nations.

Oh, I forgot to mention, that "country" is also commonly used to mean "countryside". If I say to somebody, "I don't live in town. I live in the country." it means "countryside" but people here say "country". Like in "country music".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Fourteen replies already so I won't be answering each individually, but huge thanks to everyone who replied so far! :) I will be collecting the data for a few more days, so please don't be discouraged from posting even though the thread is half a day old by now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
otsogutxi
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Hi!

I'm a native speaker of Irish English.

Country and nation are pretty much used interchangeably, but nation tends to be used in more formal or 'official' situations, but this would also depend on the speaker.

Land isn't really used to refer to a country in Ireland, probably due to such a large agricultural sector. We'd use is more when referring to 'actual' land.

I hope this helps!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GuyANDERSO2
GuyANDERSO2
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Native English speaker from United Kingdom. Country and nation tend to be used to mean the same thing. :) I hope this was helpful input.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Native English speaker from West Coast (Northern California and Southern Oregon). I use country more often than nation. To me, country seems to connotate geographic boundaries (ie "The borders around our country." ) than the spirit, and legal recognition of a group of people. (ie "We are a nation of... xyz" The "Cherokee Nation.") I believe there are also legal differences between nation and country, What those are though, I have no idea.

When I think of my use of the word "land" in terms of frequency, the smaller the more frequent in my usage. For example, the space of a garden or the borders of property, then city, then state, then country. Garden "We'll use this bit of land for gardening" or property most often "Get off my land!". I encounter land as references to countries the least often. And I can only think of one instance for country, and that is a song "This land is my land."

This isn't much, but, I hope it helps!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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As a clarification, while I would use nation to mean country on rare occasions, I would never use country to replace nation. I don't know if that is very clear, so, for instance, while I would say "Cherokee Nation"I wouldn't say "Cherokee Country". But, I would call the United States a Nation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeweIzz

Native speaker of US English from a South Atlantic state:

'Land' and 'Nation' are normally used interchangeably (though those words aren't common in everyday speech)

'Country' isn't used to mean the same thing in most cases.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

I am a native speaker of English. I grew up in Chicago (Illinois) and have lived in Santa Monica (California) Eugene (Oregon) Minneapolis (Minnesota) Fort Lauderdale (Florida) and now in Maryland (Baltimore, Annapolis, and now Germantown northwest of Washington DC.)

I haven't noticed any difference in other parts of the county in the use of these three words. And people use them interchangeably. It's not a big deal even along the political spectrum. A few examples for each:

Nation: Noun: We are a nation of immigrants. The history of our nation. Adjective: Baseball is often called our national pastime. National unity.

Country: Noun: We live in the country (rural area). The people in our country are generally outgoing and friendly. They live in a different part (region) of the country. This is a beautiful country (geography). Adjective: Country music. Country hospitality.

Land: Noun: This land is our land (lyrics). The have a lot of land. (I agree completely with Seanchi35 about use in the Midwest and South. This also holds true in Oregon and Minnesota. Verb: They landed up living in the north (likely regional or a colloquialism). The plane landed.

I lot of great responses here. I didn't see anything I would disagreed with.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/avcara
avcara
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I think nation is more likely to be used in a political context, while country is more cultural. Land is more likely to be used poetically with a qualifier, like, "I yearn for my native land." It would also be used for a region that is not necessarily ( or currently) a nation, like Bohemia, Prussia, etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wombatua
wombatua
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My English is mostly Midatlantic US. A country can be made up of different nations (see the UK, with England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland as constituent nations), and Native American/Indian tribes recognized by the US federal government are technically known as "domestic dependent nations." "Land" is what my house sits on. And you're not even asking about nation-states. I don't think I'd use any of them synonymously - they all have similar but slightly different meanings to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Louiswu15
Louiswu15
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Hi, devalanterial. I'm a native English speaker - East coast U.S., mid Atlantic region. Nation, country, and land are synonymous terms for a political entity that is a nation-state. I would normally use 'nation' to refer to a nation-state. I might use 'country' or 'land' to refer to a nation-state, but usually in an informal conversation or text, since 'land' and 'country have many another connotations.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardWal211702
RichardWal211702
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Native Hiberno-English speaker: 'Country' is by far the most commonly used term, with 'land' (in the sense of a country) reserved for literary use or some fixed expressions. Country, for me, has a meaning associated with physical or political boundaries whereas nation refers more to the group of people associated with an area. A nation can often exist as a theoretical entity with no physical counterpart (e.g. the Nation of Islam) or a former independent state or a idealised concept that may one day come to arise.

If we take the rugby tournament, The Six Nations, as an example, two of the nations are independent countries (France, Italy), three are parts of one political country with individual national identities (England, Wales, Scotland) and one is comprised of one whole political country and part of the previous country (Ireland).

The First Nations and the United Nations are really the only other times I would use the word.

The word 'state' is often used to mean a country (most often in legal language to refer to the country's involvement in an issue) and sometimes combined with 'nation' as 'nation-state'. I would avoid the latter unless necessary for a geopolitical essay.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnCooke8

Native English speaker born in England, living in Scotland.

I would use this words somewhat differently. "Nation" to me has political overtones - so that, for example, our "country", the United Kingdom, includes several nations (England, Scotland, Wales).

"Country" is used for a nation state as above, but to me also refers to the countryside (as opposed to town/city), e.g. "in the country" as opposed to "in the town".

"Land" to me is stuff that farmers grow crops on and keep animals on. I wouldn't usually use it in the national sense; I would say "in our country" rather than "in our land". However, I would understand others using it in the national sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

I would venture to guess that most Americans would use the word country to describe Scotland, Wales, and England. I'm not sure I know one word to describe the U.K. I would just say the U.K. is made up of the countries. By the way, do people in the United Kingdom dislike it when people call it the U.K.?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamontsson
Lamontsson
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SRWMack - that may true about most Americans saying that, but for the record, factually, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland and England are actually all NATIONS of the United Kingdom, which is the country. They are not different countries. This is what Scotland voted on a few years back; that is, whether to become an independant country. This actually effects how they trade and all sorts of stuff, which would probably be why most Scots voted to stay in the UK. So that's one concrete difference between a nation and a country. Scotland is a nation, but is not a country.

The Republic of Ireland (as in, with the capital of Dublin) is a different country.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

Thank you for your response. Honestly, I think yours is the best summary I've seen of the composition and proper usage of terminology for the United Kingdom.

I need to think about the Republic of Ireland. I still don't understand. I will read about it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamontsson
Lamontsson
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Well you'd probably need to check on Ireland's history, which I personally don't know a lot about, but it's got something historically with Northern Ireland wanting to be communist and then the IRA (Irish Republican Army) who obviously fought for Ireland to be a republic... and the whole thing was actually quite a bloody affair, which is what The Cranberries sing about in 'Zombie' (and in fact, other lesser known songs). But whatever happened, Ireland is a separate country now. The difference this seems to make, in the modern setting (as far as I can tell from here in Australia, which is obviously not ideal) is that most stuff that functions all over the UK is the same in Ireland, except for designating that it is the Irish branch. For example, the Royal Bank of Scotland. Comedian Michael McIntrye (English) does a joke about this, saying that in England, Scotland and Wales, it's just called the Royal Bank of Scotland. But in Ireland, it's called "The Royal Bank of Scotland (Ireland)". As far as I can tell, that would be because it is a different country. Additionally you need a passport to get there from the UK, and there are probably a bunch of differences that I wouldn't know. But like I said, check it out historically and it'll probably make more sense.

Thanks for your kind response.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

Oh, yeah, a whole lot of history between the Irish and English (and Scots). I don't recall anything about Northern Ireland and Comunnism. I recall learning of the plantation by the English of Protestants to Ireland and the resulting conflict with Irish Catholics. So much to learn. But we cannot expect ourselves to understand the details. Brilliant people spend their whole lives studying such things. But going to the heart of the bigger picture is well within our grasp if we just think about it with an open mind.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eykal

I would disagree with some of this - native English speaker living in Scotland here - I have most often heard "country" used to describe England, Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland. e.g. Scotland ran a marketing campaign at one point calling itself "the best small country in the world", and the wording of that referendum to my ears emphasised "independent" rather than "country". This is just my experience, though, and I have heard "nation" used as well, particularly in reference to the Six Nations rugby competition.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eykal

Native English speaker in Scotland here - confusingly, I'd say that many Brits would also call the UK a country or a nation while also calling its constituent parts countries and nations. The UK is a country made up of countries. Really if you call either a nation or a country you'll probably get by okay. "Regions" is not to be advised.

As for the other question, people will have no problem with it being called the UK. There can be some... politics involved (I speak only for Scotland, though my impression is that in Northern Ireland you want to tread even more carefully) but even then, the supporters of an independent Scotland I know will not take offense at being told they live in the UK (even if they'd rather they didn't!).

Now the real mistake to avoid is calling somebody English when they're actually from elsewhere in the UK. I hear England is still used sometimes overseas as a general term for the UK but that would be unlikely to make you many friends over here...

Hm. reading these two comments I've made it does appear that the UK spends a very large amount of time arguing about what to call itself. Maybe we should all get some other hobbies... :p

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

I've been known to nicely correct Americans if they use the term English when they're speaking of the other countries.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bailjo
Bailjo
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Native from US Pacific Northwest Area (Eastern Washington)

Country I think is the most commonly used term that I would use most in everyday speech. In my area it is the most dominant term and I think also in most US English.

Nation seems more formal and specific. I think it would be used more commonly in a governmental or professional context.

Those both would technically mean the same thing to me, but I would still lean toward using country more than nation.

Land is a bit different. I would use land much more often as just a common noun than using it as a term for this context. Land seems more poetic and, dare I say, old-fashioned. I would never say, " I'm traveling to the Land of Sweden," I would say, "I'm traveling to the Country of Sweden." It seems very odd to use it in this context to me. But maybe that's just because I'm younger, and my generation doesn't really use that word for this.

Feel free to comment on this and let me know your thoughts!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zerr_
Zerr_
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Native Canadian English speaker here. Each has several different meanings, so I'll try to go over the main ones. (Warning: very wordy.)

Country: This is almost always what we call Sweden, or Canada, or America, or any other self-governing entity. Saying "the nation of Sweden" sounds (a bit) less natural and more formal than "the country of Sweden".

It can also mean less developed areas, eg. "taking a vacation in the country" means "going to a place away from towns or cities and staying in a cabin and fishing for a week", if not necessarily that specific. Basically an area (usually an area in North America with woods and lakes) that has roads and some buildings, but other than that has no development on it. I hear this meaning more often in American English.

Nation: "Nation", when used with the meaning of "country", is interchangeable with "country", but more formal-sounding and a bit less common. It is used in some set phrases, like "sovereign nation" (which is a rather formal phrase, too).

It can also be used to mean a group of people who have strong ethnic, cultural, and/or social ties. For example, as mentioned in another comment here, we would say "Cree nation" to refer to people who belong to the ethnic and cultural group of the Cree, but don't have a literal country of their own.

A similar example could be made with the Sami: they live in the countries of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia, but could be called the Sami nation.

Some social groups also call themselves "nations", because they have social and cultural connections to one another. People who use vapour cigarettes sometimes refer to themselves as "Vape nation", for example.

Land: Most commonly, "land" means an area of physical ground.

"Land" used to have the same meanings as its Swedish equivalent, and in some ways, it still can be used in all those ways with little loss of understanding, but it sometimes seems off or odd or archaic.

In English-speaking countries' national anthems, which are usually several hundred years old, there are lyrics that use "land" in that way, eg.:

American National Anthem: O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave/O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

Canadian National Anthem: O Canada/Our home and native land

Et cetera.

It can't be used in the way "nation" is - "land" always has to refer to a physical place. While "country" and "nation" are used to talk about a sovereign entity or group of people, "land" can be used to talk about any physical place.

I hope this was not too confusing and I can clarify further if needed.

TL;DR "The country of Sweden" is normal; "the nation of Sweden" is formal; "the land of Sweden" is a tad poetic.

P.S.: Out of curiosity, why do you want to know this? Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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P.S.: Out of curiosity, why do you want to know this? Thanks!

We have large amounts of error reports concerning all of the above, and how they relate to their Swedish counterparts. Hence, I need to know how various natives use them, in order to figure out which regional differences we need to account for. I don't want to go by the dictionary definitions, since I figure this is a case where it's more important how they're commonly used than how they're defined by terminologists. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

Oh, boy! You asked and we answered! I hope our input is helpful!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Absolutely. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flicka930
Flicka930
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My location: Mid-Atlantic States, but I was a military brat, so I’ve lived all over the US.

Country: Used both in speech and in writing to refer to the political entity of a nation and/or the territory it occupies. It is does not carry the same implication of sovereignty that “nation” does, although it can be used that way: The USA is the country of my birth. Britain is a country that I have visited. Both the USA and Britain are countries that share common history.

Nation: is used to refer to a group of people that have organized themselves according to a generally recognized political system. It has a strong implication of sovereignty and is often used in the context of international relations: The term, Navaho Nation, refers to the Navaho people, especially with respect to their identity as a sovereign nation and all the powers that come with sovereignty. All the nations were gathered to negotiate the treaty. The teams from each of the nations were waiting for the Olympic torch to enter.

Land: It can be used rather poetically instead of country or to mean “place”. But it is most commonly used to refer to physical territory – the land itself. Poetically: They sailed away, for a year and a day, To the land where the Bong-Tree grows. Shall we go to Bali? They say it’s an exotic land. Territory: Get that wild pig off my land! Gazing out from the mesa, she could not believe how far her grazing lands extended.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/impy_imp
impy_imp
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Native from northern England, namely Yorkshire. Land I would use to refer to the physical landscape that defines the area a country encompasses. It tends to be used poetically as country e.g. "The land of our fathers." Nation I would use more for cultural connotations, kind of meaning more the people making up the country. E.g. We are a nation of tea drinkers. And country is what you get when you put both together. I found it interesting that someone else put that England is a nation not a country... I'd call Wales, England, Scotland separate countries. But then us Yorkshire natives like to think of Yorkshire as a country anyway ;-) as in Yorkshire is God's own country. (Ok I know Yorkshire isn't really a country)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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Native speaker from East USA (Tidewater area).

"Nation" and "country" are pretty much the same thing but have slightly different connotations, and might change their definitions depending on what you're talking about. "Nation" is more formal and used more often in a political or legal sense. "Country" is less formal and tends to be used in a geographical sense. The word "country" can be used to describe smaller geographic areas (remote rural geographical regions, which is also "the countryside") and that definition can be used just as much or more often, depending on who is speaking. Most people will understand if the word "country" is used as a synonym to "nation", though.

"Land" can be used to describe the same thing as "nation" and "country", but it's a bit outdated. (It's still used in songs, though; this land is your land, this land is my land, from California, to the New York island.... Very old American country song). More often than not, however, a "land" is used to describe property or an area of earth, like farmland or the land a building stands on. The only exception is in some compound words ("motherland", for example).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/avcara
avcara
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New York Island, I believe. Either way, Woody Guthrie would dig you for it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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Oops, I remember the lyrics by ear. Thanks for correcting me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

What did you think was wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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I typed "highland" instead of "island". I was always more of the reading type than the listening type even in my native language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

Oh, I thought it might have been capitalizing island. I'm a singer and have a good ear. I take things literally and know New York is not one island so I always think of it as New York islands.

There is a photo of Woodie Guthrie's handwritten lyrics. You can see where he originally wrote Staten Island (one island in New York City) then crossed it out and wrote New York Island!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

After reading other comments, I realized I left out another way I use country, and that is when speaking about other countries. I don't think of them as nations, other than the United Nations. Also, when I am speaking about the United Kingdom, I know what it includes, I always think of Scotland, Wales and England as separate countries. But I think of Northern Ireland as part of Ireland. I can't imagine thinking of it as a country.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardWal211702
RichardWal211702
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Nobody really knows the right term to use for Northern Ireland! For every one that's used by someone, ten others will reject it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

I do think of the Native American Tribes as Nations.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milenotis

Native english speaker...West Coast--Seattle area The terms are "country", "nation", and "land".

Country and nation: I use them interchangeably. Country has the added meaning of referring to a rural setting. I grew up in the country...(farm area outside of metro area).

Land--I use in a broader perspective...I live in this land (referring to the country/nation) but really describing the big geographical area. Someone else mentioned it is more poetic than specific like the other two words.

Hope this helps!
Takk!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/polskaqueen

Native English speaker from the North of England. I agree with most of the observations in this thread. "Country" is the commonest term, generally defined by geographical and/or political boundaries - except when used as a synonym for "countryside". "Nation" used mostly formally, in specific circumstances - and often as much about people as geography ("national identity"). "Land" used more descriptively or poetically for a "country" e.g. Wales as "Land of my fathers", England in the song "Land of Hope and Glory" etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyORB
CodyORB
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I am a native speaker from the Western United States (Southern CA coast). We mostly use country, and nation as an alternative word. Land is almost never used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

Having lived in Southern California, I agree that land is not used.

And I don't recall people using the word countryside or someone living in the country. I think people are more likely to be specific about the region or type of climate in which people live.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

This is the first discussion I've really followed and gotten involved in. Wow! What great participation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRWMackRosemary

Hello Devalanteriel!

I just thought of somethings that you could do..

  1. If you structure the questions a certain way, you may be able to get to answers that would sense to people in lots of different places. I'm trying to think of examples, but not coming up with good ones. This isn't perfect but e.g. Like someone decided to move from the city to the country.

  2. Another thing you could do would be to use one or two of the three terms in the sentence, which would be more directive but still use the term you want to learn. I expect that might work.

Perhaps others could come up with examples?

I realize I'm not explaining this well, but I'm still working on my first cup of coffee.

Sassy

1 year ago
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