https://www.duolingo.com/NeSmilga

"Faire la grasse matinée" - is it used in daily language?

I found this expression in Memrise with translation provided as "to sleep in". But if translate each word, it says something like " to make/grow fat in the morning". Quite figurative and funny expression, isn't it? I doubt whether this expression would be used to explain why you are late to the office :) I would appreciate an explanation whether it is used in daily language. if yes, could you please provide an example? Merci.

1 year ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/-tick-
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Hi ! Yes it is used in daily language. But a "grasse matinée" is something you are doing willingly, you don't do it when your alarm doesn't wake you up. When you say "Samedi j'étais fatigué alors dimanche j'ai fait la grasse matinée", you are happy about that, it's a good thing, you had time and you wanted to sleep more. So no, you wouldn't say to your boss "Je suis désolé d'arriver si tard, mais j'ai fait la grasse matinée".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeSmilga

Thank you. Great explanation. Lingot for you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WendyMolin568162

So, what would the expression be if you overslept your alarm?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeNolan6

That comes in the module on 'swearing'. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cahier2brouillon

— Oups, désolé patron, j'ai eu une panne d'oreiller. Promis, ça ne m'arrivera plus :( !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeSmilga

Thank you for a new expression in my vocabulary. Avoir une panne d'oreiller - to oversleep. Now need to write it down and keep close :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-tick-
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Note that "panne d'oreiller" is less used and to me it's a bit more familiar than "grasse matinée". I also think it's more recent. But it's totally valid !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-tick-
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you are right. I just made the comparison in terms of "language category", how are the expressions on the scale of familiarity and frequency. "Panne d'oreiller" is a joke : I couldn't wake up in time because my pillow had a breakdown.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeSmilga

as far as I understood, the meaning is different. "Panne d'oreiller" can be used for an excuse being late, while "grasse matinee"-not, as it was on purpose. Or I am wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeNolan6

There are expressions in every language that make no sense when read literally. For example in English we say "it is raining cats and dogs". In France they would say "Il pleut des cordes", or literally, 'ít is raining ropes'. That actually paints a somewhat more vsually accurate picture of a driving rainstorm than the English expression does.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeSmilga

Yes, this is correct. Actually in my native language we use similar expression of growing fat while rolling in the bed or sleeping too long, but this would be with a slight sense of being lazy. My parents used to say this to kids. But such an expression would be never used in more formal conversations, you could see it only in novels and informal language in family or very close friends. Thank you for a comment and another example. Lingot to you :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardWal211702
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'grasse' refers to the morning itself (however bizarre that seems) and has nothing to do with the person being or getting fat.

1 year ago
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