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https://www.duolingo.com/per9000

Teach Esperanto to kids?

per9000
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I have two kids: a daughter that likes sports, a son that doesn't, and I want them both to have meaningful non-school activities, so I'm sort of worried that my son will only play computer games all day.

I've always been interested in learning Esperanto, so I asked my son if he wanted to learn Esperanto with some of his friends, and he seems really fond of the idea. So now I'm learning Esperanto in order to be able to start an Esperanto club at his school this fall. (That's the plan, we'll see how it goes).

Now that I'm starting to get the basic ideas (Esperanto level 11 after 38 days), I've started to think about how to have an Esperanto club for 9 year olds. Their native language is Swedish and they have started learning English and can say basic phrases in English, but things like duolingo is impossible (and the the school will not have enough computers/tablets anyway).

To make things even more interesting I'm not a teacher, and I have never planned lectures or so in the past.

So my question for you, mia karaj esperantistoj, is if you have had similar experiences? What do you do in an Esperanto club for kids? How can you plan and perform a series of fun and varied meetings?

When it comes to material I guess that duolingo, lernu and vikipedio are good sources - are there other good places to look for stuff for beginners?

Brakumojn, Per

1 year ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ECLB324
ECLB324
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I might be able to offer some help. I have recently started teaching an Esperanto elective at the Sunday school at my synagogue. It's for 4-7th graders, and is only 30 min every week, so VERY minimal. And I'm only on level 17, but it works. I usually spend the first ten minutes telling them part of the Esperanto story. Not to bog them down, but enough to make it interesting. So...about Zamenhoff giving each guest at his 19th birthday party an Esperanto dictionary -- interesting facts like that, mixed with sober facts about how Zamenhoff wanted a universal language because of all the nationlism-driven strife he saw around him. (This is all in English, of course). For the Esperanto part, we make it pretty fun. Last time, I gave them each a coloring page of a domestic scene (house, clouds etc). Then taught them the names of colors and the objects, and then said things like, "La domo estas blua." They then colored their houses blue, and we went on to orange clouds, and so on, until we were done. I then held up my own copy (which I had done beforehand) and they compared theirs to mine. I think there is a lot of fun exercises that can be done with affixes too -- like write them on the board, along with a list of adjectives, and then ask each student a question like, 'Figure out how to say "old" (mal + juna). It's like putting a puzzle together. I'm not a certified teacher, but I think it's going great.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/per9000
per9000
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Great ideas, thank you :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Evonne - Maybe you know me from the FB group as well. As I mentioned in my other comment in this thread, please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inmyidealworld

Hi, I looked into this a few years back and came across Penelope Vos in Australia. She has created a curriculum to teach esperanto in schools, even if you are not a language teacher (specialist). It looks very good but I haven't tried it. Here is the link: http://www.mondeto.com/talking-to-the-whole-wide-world.html

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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This is a topic near and dear to my heart, and I have a number of thoughts... although not in any order.

Coincidentally, I recently received a message from a from a Norwegian named Per (I didn't know that was a common name) and I'm teaching Esperanto to his son via Google Hangouts.

I did (taught) a lesson a few months ago with a High School teacher on the west coast of the US who is teaching Esperanto to a few of his students.

I'm also working with a father and daughter to do some lessons via video conference. We'll be starting soon - so I'm working on the content and approach for our sessions. I think the daughter is 8.

Then there are my own children - my youngest will be known to people who have watched Lernu kun Logano on YouTube. He and I will be at NASK this summer, so I'm looking for ways to help get him engaged in learning between now and then.

I've got some materials - of varying quality - for children of all ages. I have stacks of baby books and books for small children. I have the somewhat crudely done course "Flugu kun Petro". I recently got a copy of Tendaraj Tagoj, which I think is for older children. I'll need to give that a look.

I see Mazi has been mentioned. That's a good one. (Logano and I discuss the first Mazi series through our Lernu kun Logano videos.)

For people in Europe working with older children, I would look into the Verdaj Skoltoj.

I would be very interested in working with teachers and group leaders via video conference if that would be helpful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/per9000
per9000
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I've actually had the idea of trying to find a "sister project" somewhere and having video conferences with this other group of kids. It would be complete chaos at first, of course. But after some time it could be to them what penpals was for people who are now in their 30/40-ies.

Where can you buy books in Esperanto for kids? Amazon?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Amazon is hit or miss. Some of the books are good and at good prices. Others are horrible -- machine translated and worthless - or extremely overpriced. I would start with UEA or with the book service of your national Esperanto association.

I've collected my books over many years - from before my kids were babies, actually.

I have a few thoughts of how I could help. They might not all be good thoughts... but it would be interesting to moderate a video call between young people from different areas -- for example, between your students and some of my remote students. I could also visit some of your sessions by video call - maybe have my younger son join me - even though he's older than the kids you mentioned. I could also help you if you have questions about Esperanto.

I imagine this idea will develop as you go forward. Some kids will be more interested than others. It'd be nice to have good models for the kids who really want to learn.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/per9000
per9000
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These are really interesting suggestions. It's obviously very early in the process for us (I haven't started the project yet), but I will keep this in mind. It sounds like a great idea.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CreedeLambard

I've been in on Google hangouts in Esperanto in the past. Maybe someone would be willing to host one with a group of students somewhere else in the world?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CreedeLambard

I have no idea whether the Sveda Esperanto-Federacio has a book service, but if they do, that would be the place to start. Otherwise I'd check into buying books from the UEA in Rotterdam, or from the Esperanto-USA book service which has a very good collection and four pages on their website of children's material (although you'd probably be hit with customs duties, and certainly shipping costs, which is less likely to happen if you can order from UEA).

There are some gems available if you look. For instance back in the 70s I bought a book printed in China called "Klopodoj de Simioj por Elakvigi la Lunon"; it is still available, but the title is now "Simioj Provas Elakvigi La Lunon". I can't IMAGINE why it changed. :) That one has two stories and is only USD 2.50. I notice they also have copies of Winnie-La-Pu if that wouldn't be too young for the children in question.

Good luck! Fun and engaging books can boost their interest in learning the language immeasurably.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inmyidealworld

Also, there are the old video lessons called "Mazi en Gondolando" . You can still get the course workbooks if you search around. Although, you could probably create your own course based upon the videos. Here is the link to the youtube videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWbyXVSiCxw&list=PL00F795A844E2824F

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMey
JasonMey
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Tim Morely did a Ted Talk about using Esperanto to teach children how to learn foreign languages. It doesn't really go into detail about how this is done, but it could be helpful to watch. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gSAkUOElsg

Another good resource is Kurso, a computer application for Windows, Mac, and Linux. I've used the English version, but their website is also available in Swedish, so I would think the course should be available in Swedish as well. http://kurso.com.br/index.php?sv

Finally, Ba Ba Dum is a website for learning vocabulary using several different types of games that features over 20 different languages, including Esperanto. It also offers English and Swedish, so the students can practice those vocabularies as well. https://babadum.com

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/per9000
per9000
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Great! I'll have a look at these!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/farfelo

I would suggest that to some degree you use props and "act out" some of the sentences. Instead of always writing on a board or continuously using a book. Get a couple stuffed toys and "la hundo cxasas la katon." "La kato saltas super la hundon." "Kie estas la krajono? Mi forgesis ... Ho! Jen! La krajono estas sur mia orelo." (well these are more complicated than you would start with)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AustinCaudill

Jes! very good idea I do think we should teach Esperanto to our younger ppl. I too am interested in the idea of an Esperanto club! Maybe to teach you should have games, songs, etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/per9000
per9000
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Yes, I think that if you focus on the fun, the grammar will come aswell, sooner or later

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Garnetskull
Garnetskull
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This sounds like a really fun idea. I hope more students become interested in Esperanto as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/per9000
per9000
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I agree, and in languages in general. The idea of larger languages trying to suppress smaller ones (this was even done in Sweden to minority languages), really makes me sad.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerberuEsperanto

European Identity, (search for) Zlatko Tisljar Assoc4 EU Consciousness Maribor 3/8'11 www.debatingeurope.eu/2011/08/03/should-esperanto-be-the-language-of-europe/#.V53JpLh95hF http://www.debatingeurope.eu/2011/12/19/is-a-european-identity-possible/#.WIvTJfl97mE show equal respect to all, including the speakers of those 'minority languages'

  1. humans are social beings

  2. satisfy social desire in many societies/groups. Each group develops Social Identity

  3. main sign of 1’s IDentity is Language (role of communication and identity)

  4. Using somone's IDentity is not good idea. Neutral Esperanto is mutual/respectful better way (it doesn't devalue the languages of interCultural communication).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/per9000
per9000
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Interesting. :-)

1 year ago