"Monday through Friday."

Translation:De lundi à vendredi.

February 27, 2013

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/carmelsweetie
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Why doesn't "vendredi" need an article like "de" or "le"?

May 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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"le vendredi" means "on Fridays".

"de" is not an article but a preposition (like à, par, pour...): de vendredi à lundi

May 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/carmelsweetie
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Oh. Merci!

May 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ruinchristmas

What is the difference between "du lundi au vendredi" and "de lundi à vendredi"?

February 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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There is a difference in the scope of time: "du lundi au vendredi" means: "every week, from Monday to Friday".

Whereas "de lundi à vendredi" means: from Monday to Friday -> a certain week, this week, or next week, or last week, but not every week.

February 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ruinchristmas

merci !

February 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzanneNussbaum

DL also accepted "Du lundi jusqu'au vendredi," which I guess would be a strengthened version of your first example (the one happening in the course of every week) ?

Many thanks for your explanations.

July 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/malakkm
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why didnt we use a travers ? :s

July 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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Prepositions are fickle, just learn them, there is hardly ever any reason why one is used vs another one.

July 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PisaLisa

A travers means "see through" .

September 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mariska1234567

English is not my native language and untill now I haven't had any trouble with it. Perhaps there is someone willing to help me. I don't understand this sentence: "monday through friday".

May 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jamac1950

Through is an Americanism and not commonly used in the UK although due to many US TV programmes it's understood

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mariska1234567

That might explain my confusion. Thanks!

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/d10MplTj

In the UK we would say "from Monday to Friday", a direct translation from the French.

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Vinnfred
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every day from Monday to Friday

May 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925
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Sometimes "X to Y" can be ambiguous as to whether the time period ends at Y, or ends when Y ends: "I'm working from July to August" could mean you finish working at the beginning of August, or at the end of it. "Through" is used to make it clear that the whole period of Y is included: "I'm working from July through August" means "until the end of August".

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mariska1234567

Thank you very much!

June 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/rmajunior
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why not: lundi à vendredi in a simple straightforward way just like it is in English?

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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French is not a translation from English, so you have to accept that things can be a bit more complicated.

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/OldBen44
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In America 'through' means that you stop when you reach it; in England 'through' means that you continue until you come out the other side. Confusing!

November 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/michaelangeloo

This is just getting very boring...shame .it was acceprably interesting up until now

August 19, 2018
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