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  5. "Kama nikija nitapika chakula"

"Kama nikija nitapika chakula"

Translation:If I come, I will cook a meal

April 7, 2017

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wwaish

If I come I will cook food.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brjaga
  • 2315

Report it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mamanura

I'd translate this English sentence as; nikija, nitakpika. Kama nikija doesn't look OK to me..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

The lesson tips weren't very helpful but from other sources I learned that it is fine to combine "kama" and "nikija" for extra emphasis.

I would clarify the Tips and notes (starting with the verb infix -ki-), as follows:


The use of -ki- as ’if’

Conditional sentences in Kiswahili can be formed by including the tense particle -ki- between the subject prefix and the verb in the first part of the sentence (the condition).

It is always followed by a future tense (or an imperative, which has future implication) in the verb in the second part of the sentence (the consequence).

When -ki- is used with monosyllabic verbs, the infinitive ku- is dropped.

My examples:

"Ukisoma, utafaulu." (If you study, you will succeed.)

"Nikila, nitakunywa."
(If I eat, I will drink.)

Duolingo examples:

"Ukijifunza Kiswahili, utaweza kuzungumza na watanzania."
(If you learn Kiswahili, you will be able to speak with Tanzanians.)

"Tukipata pesa, tutaenda Ulaya."
(If we get money, we will go to Europe.)

"Tukila ugali, tutashiba." (If we eat ugali/porridge, we will be full.)


The use of kama as ’if’

Conditional sentences in Kiswahili can also be expressed by the word "kama".

Kama may be used before the verb bearing the conditional -ki- tense to strengthen the condition 'if', but it may also be used with other tenses than -ki-.

It is followed by a future tense in the verb in the second part of the sentence (the consequence).

My examples:

"Kama ukisoma, utafaulu."
(If you study, you will succeed.)

"Kama utasoma, utafaulu."
(If you study, you will succeed.)

"Kama ulisoma, utafaulu."
(If you studied, you will succeed.)

Duolingo examples:

"Kama utajifunza Kiswahili, utaweza kuzungumza na watanzania. "
(If you learn Kiswahili, you will be able to speak with Tanzanians.)

"Kama tutapata pesa, tutaenda Ulaya."
(If we get money, we will go to Europe.)

"Kama tutakula ugali, tutashiba." (If we eat ugali/porridge, we will be full.)



https://www.duolingo.com/profile/machieng

The problem with 'nikija nitapika' is it can also mean 'when' as well as 'if'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradleyHes

Likewise, isnt this saying "if, if i come.."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/machieng

they honestly phrase these things in the most annoying way. It would make sense to say 'Kama nitakuja (nitaja), nitapika chakula', which is unquestionably 'if I come'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kracck

Chakula is there so Food should be in the translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philightentist

man.....UGH! I am already not a confident person, and this is making my learning experience exponentially worse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YoungGreg1

I feel you :( But keep it up okay! We can do this! Remember what Duolingo has taught us: "Mkijifunza kiswahili mtafurahi"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aboutpurpo

if i come i will cook food


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidScott493272

now there is a 'chakula' but its nowhere to be seen in the translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brjaga
  • 2315

I'm not a native speaker of Swahili, so I can't speak with authority, but I know that sometimes verbs that are intransitive in English need an object in other languages; so, for instance "I eat" is translated into Chinese as 我吃饭, which is literally "I eat rice", but 饭 is just standing in as a default object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

Very interesting! Can any Swahili speakers out there confirm whether -pika is transitive or intransitive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/machieng

you can be specific about what is being cooked, but if you just say 'napika' it's understood that you're cooking (the 'chakula' is implied, since the verb doesn't apply to objects other than food)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angela53250

FOOD should be in the translation, or just leave it out please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

The students (who read these comments) can't change any of the questions. You need to use the report button (or flag icon in the app) to let the course developers know there is an error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarelSchmit

Pika has many uses in swahili .... so you have to make clear what you "pika" .... in English you don't say ... I cook food ... you say ... I cook ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mulsab

I thought never combine Kama with Ki. It should be either 'Nikija' OR 'Kama nitakuja'

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