"Je veux un bon jus d'orange."

Translation:I want a good orange juice.

6 years ago

178 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/smiller23
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Does "I want a good orange juice" sound odd to anyone else?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/extremeblueness

No. It sounds just fine to me. I can just imagine someone who had always had bad orange juice saying "Do you know what I want? I want a good orange juice."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jordanf451

The problem with Duolingo is that you have to imagine the possible (and maybe only possible) context too often. It is a good exercise for the imagination, though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvgenyUrub
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That's usually me when those idiots at the cafes and restaurants bring me 'Sunny D' instead of a real orange juice. But I would actually say 'real' instead of 'good'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeroeOMER

Or I want some "fresh" orange juice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanielN2006

Yes, that would make sense!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineKr

Indirectly here it implies " a glass of"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aronjunker
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It could also be "if you are at the supermarket, i want a good orange juice"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoieKiki

People, "a good orange juice" is incorrect English because "orange juice" is an uncountable noun, therefore there should be no article. Think about it, you wouldn't say, "this is a bad orange juice." You say: this is bad orange juice. No article needed. So it should read "I want good orange juice" without "a"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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Yes, "juice" is uncountable in English. That does not, however, mean that "a juice" is incorrect. Applying "a" to an uncountable noun yields the meaning "a variety of [uncountable noun]." Maybe it's clearer with "soup," another uncountable noun, but I doubt anybody would find "This is a good soup" to be a strange sentence. It's just that the distinction between orange juices are more subtle than between soups, but there are different brands, different pulp contents, etc.

In short, "This is a bad orange juice" means that this variety of orange juice is bad. If you drink some orange juice from the carton, and it tastes bad, "This is bad orange juice" is ambiguous as to whether it's bad because that carton has spoiled or some such or if that variety of orange juice is in general bad. "This is a bad orange juice" would have only the second meaning.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoieKiki

Just like the phrase "He makes a good money" is incorrect because "money" is uncountable too - it has no plural form, neither does "juice", rather: "he makes good money."

There's nothing like "monies: or "juices" it's "a lot of money" and "a lot of juice".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2cGAc67
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JoieKiki - your point is absolutely correct - in English we do not say "a juice." We can, in good English, say "a drop of juice" or "a glass of juice" but never "a juice." So the correct English translation should be "I want good orange juice" regardless of the literal French syntax. I used the report option for this sentence.

By the way, in colloquial English, people sometimes say "I want a coffee" meaning a cup of coffee, but only colloquially, and usually when giving an order at a coffee bar.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoieKiki

Just like the phrase "He makes a good money" is incorrect because "money" is uncountable too - it has no plural form, neither does "juice". There's nothing like "monies" or "juices".

You don't say "I want a money" you say, "I want money" not "I want a milk" there's no such thing as "milks" so you say, "I want milk" instead.

Thus, you don't say "a good juice" it's simply "good juice".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liveforcookies42

Your right i could imagine that easily

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercybucket

I think the idiomatic expression is, "I'd want a nice glass of orange juice".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kikibex04
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Maybe "I'd like " instead of "want" I'm not as harsh as that other guy

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

Definitely not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercybucket

sorry, "I want a nice glass of orange juice".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleStodda

But then they would use joli instead of bon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnowyLake

Or maybe 'muuuum, this ones bent! I want a GOOD orange juice' That's what came to my mind anyways

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolmbaron

except you would more likely say "I want some good orange juice"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweet32002

Ohh now i get it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angelfire213

i'm guessing English is not your first language. That is not used. Orange juice is not countable. A glass of good orange juice maybe. You couldn't say i want two good orange juices either

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

No, actually it is used. You are not speaking of a literal single orange juice as though it were countable, you are speaking of your desire for "a good orange juice" as a wine connoisseur may say "I love a good wine", as he smacks his lips after drinking from his glass.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikitakimba

It wouldn't be implausible to be standing in the supermarket in front of the vast array of juices, saying "I want a good orange juice" because a lot are loaded with extra sugar, are reconstituted, or don't have much actual orange juice content.

To angelfire213: sure, it's not common usage, but you don't commonly hear someone say "I want shiraz vinegar" either, and yet this is exactly what I said to my sister yesterday when she asked what I wanted from the shops :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2cGAc67
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Nikitakimba, as a native American English speaker, I can tell you that the English translation of this French sentence sounds really, really strange, and makes anyone saying it sound like a non-native speaker.

Colloquially, meaning in slang, meaning in SUBstandard usage, people placing orders where food and drink are sold, might say "I'll have two coffees and a juice" meaning, 'I'll have two servings of coffee and one serving of juice" (which is correct English) but that is not standard formal usage. Native English speakers would say "I want good orange juice" or "some good orange juice" but not "a good orange juice." We do say "a good wine" but that reflects the fact that there are so many different kinds of wine, but we native American English speakers do not generally speak of "a good juice."

All that being said, my gripe is not that Duolingo accepts an English translation of "I want a good orange juice" but that it does NOT accept the far better English translation of "I want good orange juice" which is how that concept is conveyed in standard English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angelfire213

hmm. ok. in that case i could see that. But I think that's still not in everyday common usage.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

You're quite right, it's not common, I heard my parents and middle-aged people using it, I think it's just a slightly outdated form of expression that's fading out but still around in places.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/extremeblueness

No, not even close to common. But not so rare as to be unheard of.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liveforcookies42

I can say to my mum, mum buy the GOOD orange juice i hate the other one

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/efisgpr
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When you go to a new store, you may ask for a recommendation for a good orange juice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/huhof

'i'd like' as in 'i would like', 'i want', 'i like', 'i would want' are all perfectly good English constructs all meaning the exact same thing - stating a desire. However there is a difference in the style. IF a choice comes up between this or that, then you have to use a future tense in 'will' or 'would': 'Should I get a choice, then I would like/want this/that'. Often even if there is not a choice at all, you might still say 'I would' - this would be out of courtesy to the person offering; without the 'would' is just this little more definitive ("you WANT? well, you can't have it!" might be the reply). And finally, 'like' is also a little less definitive (you LIKE? Well, we'll see." And by the way, I can easily see myself ordering two good orange juices at a bar. The fact that they'll be in glasses (or bottles) would be taken for granted. That's English for ye.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

Those 4 expressions don't mean the exact same thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pjbf1979
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Yes, but if you replace orange juice with wine it makes more sense. That's the context I normally hear it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineKr

Right. Like: "Red wine, please!" But still "I would have some good wine"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

'I would have some good wine' sounds like 18th century colonial English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercybucket

I think it means something else used in that context. keep in mind that I am from the NE US.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Azerend
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Yeah. I think taking out the "a" in English would make it sound more natural.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beemerich
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Sounds very strange to me. I'm not sure what a valid English translation could realistically be.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjchem

It accepted "I want good orange juice" without the "a"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2cGAc67
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cjchem- Hmm, not for me, just now - "I want good orange juice" - which I agree is the far better English translation - was NOT accepted. So I used the report option.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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Just accepted "I want good orange juice" for me. Technical glitches can happen. Perhaps there was one but it got resolved? If this answer isn't accepted for anyone else, take a screenshot, and submit a bug report.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineKr

To my ear "some juice" is still better

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercybucket

I want a nice glass of orange juice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shan007

It does...I was tempted to put "glass of" into my response but figured it would be a wrong answer

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tevenyel
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It does sound odd, but I thought about it a little... and perhaps it's referring to brands/qualities of orange juice. Like, someone is going to get you some orange juice and you clarify that you want a good one? I dunno; I tried. I don't think it would come up very often, if ever, though.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

It does by itself. In order for me not to go insane over the english translations I just add context to sentences like these. For this one, I thought about a kid wanting a good carton of orange juice those little kids' juice boxes...c'aide!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xzxiAssass

The "a" just doesn't make sense

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prandall1

Yes, because "juice" is a mass noun, not a count noun. If I sat down at a diner and the server asked me what I want to drink, I would say that I want juice, or I would say I want some juice, or a glass of juice. It would be strange to say that I want "a juice."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the.young.french

yeah it does...but maybe whoever made this question was used to receiving bad oj and wanted to specify that they wanted a good oj...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/notsonewbie

Yes, I totally agree with you. Orange juice is not usually preceded with "a." You might say I want a good cup of orange juice, but not just I want a good orange juice. But could be in French that is accepted, even if it sounds funny in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emuthebird57

Yup very odd.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/armandotij3

In Spanish its Yo quiero un buen jugo de naranja same idea

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyahIstamb

Yes. I translated it literally and it was wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maillerose

Yes, it really should be "I would like a nice cup of orange juice."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fionn33477

No as you could say to maybe a waiter, I want a GOOD ornge juice not a bad one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2cGAc67
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Fionn33477 - But it would be far more common in standard English to tell the waiter "I want good orange juice" or "some good orange juice" without the "a." (How many restaurants offer a choice between good and bad orange juices anyway?) Let's keep it real, LOL, and stop contriving excuses for Duolingo's poor English translation of this sentence!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaipanther

Yes

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SWilliamsJD

It's very odd and I have never heard anyone say that. Doubt I ever will.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2cGAc67
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Agreed, and I cannot imagine why anyone gave you a dislike for your comment.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexanderzhoubao

"I want a good ol' orange juice" would sound alot less odd

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bright298445

Yeah it does

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeeanVeldh

Yes

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kurtis96562

Basically, the sentence is meaning "I want the <insert brand-name orange juice here> instead of <insert off-brand name here>".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluthulhu

Normally 'orange juice' is in a suitable receptacle, so while the translation is technically right, it is not proper English grammar. Wherein the proper, logical sentence would be "I want a good glass of orange juice"; as it is rare to see orange juice outside of a glass, except in the case of a spill, which you would not want.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweet32002

Yes it really does i put the but nooo its wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

I think in English we would generally say "nice" for non-alcoholic drinks because it carries a stronger connotation of pleasant taste than "good" does. A nice juice vs a good juice, to my ears the former sounds much better.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RazMcBaz

It marked me incorrect. Frustrating

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineKr

yes, it sound weird to me, too. The juice is not countable. And I agree with "nice" vs "good" concept, the juice cannot be good, just nice.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claima
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in French, un bon jus de fruit, un bon morceau de fromage, une bonne assiette meants a big quantity and not quality of food. If we speak about quality, we say "je veux un jus d'orange qui soit bon*

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/singerred

"I want "some" good orange juice" is what we would say in English. Seems there should be a way to phrase that en francais.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

That's not what it's saying.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crush
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Maybe "Je veux du bon jus d'orange"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

What is the contraction "d'orange?" Would it be "du" or "de"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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Jus de fraise = strawberry juice

Jus de fruits = fruit juice

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jus_de_fruits

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

so you're saying it's de?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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yes

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/efisgpr
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The reason it's just "de" is that "de fruit", "d'orange", etc. are simply descriptive phrases, just like "pineapple" in "pineapple juice" is telling you only which kind of fruit. The reason to use "du" or "de la" would be if you need the definite article to specify/"define" which particular pineapple.

a book about history = A history book = un livre d'histoire

a book about the history of the internet = un livre de l'histoire de l'internet

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JesuisAnu

When to use of/'s and when only noun.

Why 'Jus d'orange' = 'Orange's juice' or 'Juice of Orange' is wrong? Is there any rule to demarcate the use or not use of word 'of' ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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I'm sorry but I cannot think of any specific rule why this is so.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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Actually, literally translated, "Jus d'orange" means "juice of THE orange." We translate that to "orange juice" in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamaux
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When it comes to food & drink stuff as in a specific quantity, the definite article isn't required, so it just becomes de or d' meaning "of". So in this case, "un bon jus d'orange" is just "a nice juice of orange" or more commonly in English it's plain "a nice orange juice".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheJunjie

In French, we do not have two sounding vowels next to each other. For example,

  • ce est becomes c'est (this is)
  • je écris becomes j'écris (I write)

and in this case,

  • du/de orange becomes d'orange. ((some) orange)

The sounding vowel at the end of the first word is omitted, along with the spacing. They are then replaced with an apostrophe. (')

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

I know now, merci. It's was a while ago but thanks anyways! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheJunjie

However, here's something to ponder about:

Why isn't tu es shortened into t'es?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

Because the French didn't think it sounded vowel-y enough, but it's slang in French.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

FYI it should be j'ecris (conjugation for je/tu) in your first response, not j'ecrivent (conjugation for ils/elles)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheJunjie

Yes, thank you. I just realised that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pentti
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What is the difference between: a good orange juice and a good juice of orange? RSV.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Awwami
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No difference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dujie1968
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But duolingo shows me "I want a good juice of orange." is wrong!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Awwami
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Because even though there's no difference in meaning, it's still not used that way in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dujie1968
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Oh, I see. Thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

In the second case, you've already selected the orange .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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"juice of orange" is not proper English. It's just "orange juice." If you wanted to translate it literally, it would be "juice of THE orange."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coconutnora

is duch esay

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrazzC
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As opposed to wanting a bad orange juice

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maepfre

This makes me picture a child sitting next to his father at a bar.. "I want a good whiskey," "I want a good orange juice!".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonSais

Non, je veux un mal jus d'orange!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pants576

he wants some without pulp

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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Or maybe with pulp. Some people prefer it that way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuraiParsnip

Ahh, bad orange juice -- truly the bane of my life.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/subyng

Should there be a liaison between veux and un?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LizzyDrake1

you say i want good orange juice though not a good orange juice. its not right

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keirakeayes

the sentence dose not sound right i reported a problem

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PangurCat
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The quest for good orange juice continues.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Enquanto18

I think it's more natural to say "I want some good orange juice" than using the article "a"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nevin711542
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I typed in I want good orange juice and it showed it as incorrect. "a good orange juice" is equivalent to "a good water". It is bad English since both are mass nouns.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanSears5

I want good orange juice sounds better

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cuatro_dedos

DL screwed the pooch on this one. It is an unnatural sentence in English, plain and simple. We could rationalize and defend context all day long, but in English vernacular, this would be, at best, an uncommon way of saying what would normally be said as "I want good orange juice" or "I want some good orange juice". How many times are we marked wrong for providing the literal translation, rather than the implied translation into English? Bottom line: the indefinite article does not belong in the translated sentence. The sheer volume of comments (for and against), is enough justification for DL to accept the "natural" English translation, and let us all get on with our lives.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nish2306

I see this thread was made four years ago and the mistake still hasn't been corrected :(

"I want a good orange juice" just sounds wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mac747116

So, why would some one say, "I want a good orange juice" in the way they would ask for a fresh beer? Thoughts?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
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I just don't know. Anglophones don't seem to be connoisseurs of orange juice. It's drank. It's liked, enjoyed, even loved. But it's a bit of a commodity. (see Randolph Duke's explanation ("Trading Places") for further insight) Not unlike milk. Would you ever "Know this place that has great milk. Would you like a glass?" Or maybe to the waiter "I'll have a glass of your finest milk!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeeanVeldh

This doesn't really make sense

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeeanVeldh

It would only make sense if you removed the "a"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristophorRonk

Yeah.. the "a" sounds weird. They should accept it without it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistymorisson

IT DOESNT GET TYPOS! srsly i put I wan a good orange juice. and I forgot the t and it said I was wrong...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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That's because "wan" is actually a word in English, meaning pale or sickly. Usually, Duo will accept typos, UNLESS the typo makes an actual, real word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

Then check your work before submitting. srsly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikrou

Why is it "bon" (m.) and not "bonne" (f.) if the orange is fem.?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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Because the noun "jus" is a masculine noun. "Orange" modifies the noun, and furthermore "orange" is invariable, i.e. both masculine and feminine. "Un" modifies the noun "jus"..."le jus"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhbk
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I can't be the only person who hears "Je veux L'un bon jus d'orange". Yes, I know that would be incorrect but the 'l' I am hearing really put me off!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barbara.gr5
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I had no idea what she was saying for 'veux'. All I could hear was the "vowel" sound, couldn't hear any 'v' sound at all I like I usually can. I've missed so many on this lesson, it's taking me forever to get through it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GauravSing6

Why not - je veux un bon du jus d'orange.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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Because the "du" is already there, just contracted, in "d'orange." "Je veux un bon du jus d'orange" is literally translated as "I want a good of the juice of the orange," whereas "je veux un bon jus d'orange" literally translates to "I want a good juice of the orange" (in English, we say "orange juice" instead of "juice of the orange" though).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scratching1

"I want a good juice with orange" is apparently wrong. ARGH!!!!!!!! >:(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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That's because it's "I want a good ORANGE JUICE" (literal translation, "juice of the orange," which is not used in vernacular English).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fredwsmith
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Very frustrating. My brain simply would not recognize "un bon jus" at all when I played it repeatedly. I repeated this section for practice and have seen/heard the phrase often already but nothing made sense today. Any suggestions on improving audio recognition/understanding?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
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practice it a few times and then move on. don't dwell on it. don't let that one thing frustrate you. spread you frustration around. there's plenty in french to frustrated you. don't put all your frustration in one basket. then come back to it some time later and repeat process.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TempleRachel

me too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HASSAN_Ali123
<h1>MeToo</h1>
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EbenNguyen

Shouldnt it be "du jus"??? This is how i learned it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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No, because that means "of the juice," but the literal translation of the correct sentence is "juice of the orange."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nickabee

The Duolingo translation sounds awkward. More natural would be "I want a good glass of orange juice."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ranjeeeth

Nice juice of orange is wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tilly895149

Its just not good English. .. but maybe it's normal in french?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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Actually, it is proper English. It's just not a common thing to say. It could mean that you're asking for a good quality orange juice, or a good brand of orange juice, or a good (meaning huge) glass of orange juice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaraGopal

Wrote "I want the juice of a good orange" instead of "i want a good orange juice". This is tough.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seramason

And a good orange juice you shall get!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamieBarrett1.5

Normal juice won't suffice - I want a good orange juice!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rickysechs

i want a good juice of orange

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Love__Bug21

I mistranslated into "I want a big juicy orange" Lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elisabeth237981

Glad I'm not the only one

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Irina533418

would like is same as want

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/namkyung.r
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How is this two different? Bon & Bien as in "Good"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WindsorRus

Generally, I would say, "I want good orange juice."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chloe_Fallen

ok, but grammatically speaking, this is rubbish. In my opinion, it should let me say I want good orange juice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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Grammatically speaking, it's fine. It's not saying you want good orange juice in general. It's saying you want a specific type of orange juice. It's equivalent to "I want a good (brand) of orange juice."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Viv754077

I would like is the same as I want and more polite

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanielN2006

It sounds so odd!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janette659330

I would like not okay???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewellNoak

Normally, in English you would say I want a glass(container) of good orange juice. OR I want good orange juice or perhaps some good orange juice. The use of the indefinite article is a literal translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoieKiki

"A good orange juice" is incorrect English because " orange juice " is an uncountable noun, therefore, there shouldn't be an article. Think about it, you don't say, " this is a bad orange juice. " You say : this is bad orange juice. No article needed. So the sentence should read: "I want good orange juice. " without the "a"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoieKiki

"A good orange juice" is incorrect English because " orange juice " is an uncountable noun, therefore, there shouldn't be an article. Think about it, you don't say, " this is a bad orange juice. " You say : this is bad orange juice. No article needed. So the sentence should read: "I want good orange juice. " without the "a"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MicheleWiFi

Wow what a long thread for such a phrase. Très intéressant; This phrase definitely has french origins. The English translation doesn't do it any justice. D'accord ? Je prefère ... je veux un bon jus d'orange. Bien sûr,,,

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceKidane

That is not correct! Wouldn't 'I want a nice glass of orange juice' be more proper?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth454030

I am a NZ English speaker and have translated this as I want a good drink of orange juice which I think is a similar translation and therefore quite appropriate

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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To me that means something somewhere between "I want to take a large swig of orange juice" and "I want a good-sized glass of orange juice," a semantic range distinct from wanting "good orange juice."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oggign

Why is "I want a tasty orange juice" wrong? I thought "bon" can be translated to tasty, good...?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freeman166

A Good orange juice c'est parfait

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzanne752236

'I would like' = 'I want'

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
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When Duo uses such sentences, I ask myself "Is it an idiom I haven't come across?" and that makes me read the thread. Mission accomplished, Duo?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrikrishna1
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Why I want a good juice of orange, is incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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We just don't say it like that in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrikrishna1
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merci

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrushantDhode

What's wrong in 'I want a good juice of orange'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/9837178987

Is thos translation wrong for this "I want a good juice of orange."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nevin711542
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juice is a mass noun (uncountable) so no 'a' article is used. I understand the answer without the 'a' is accepted but why encourage poor English grammar?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreuswolf

"I'd like" should be an acceptable answer if "I want" is.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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No. "I'd like" or "I would like" is "Je voudrais." "Je veux" is ONLY "I want."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidJones22

I want a good juice of orange sounds fine to me but is marked wrong

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mew6ally

that's not very good english.... better would be " I want some nice orange juice" or " I want a nice glass of orange juice"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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Actually, it works. It's just not a common thing to say. It could mean that you're asking for a good quality orange juice, or a good brand of orange juice, or a good (meaning huge) glass of orange juice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hariharan1135

Or should it be ''je veux un bon jus de 'l orange"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
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No, because the "de le" becomes "du," and then gets contracted since it comes before a word that starts with a vowel ("orange"), so it has to be "je veux un bon jus d'orange."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sk_awesomeness

It should be I want a juice to orange

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dak_de_gene

To me, yes. I would never use the 'a'

4 years ago
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