https://www.duolingo.com/IanGordon12

Pig meat in its various forms

I've encountered cig moch and bacwn, and elsewhere I've encountered porc. When would I use which word? Where does ham fit in? What's the Welsh for ham?

Obviously bacwn = bacon, but google translate renders cig moch as bacon, whereas a cookery show I have in the background on TV right now uses cig moch for a pork chop, hence my question.

1 year ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
EllisVaughan
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I'd recommend avoiding google translate in pretty much all instances. I can recommend some other dictionaries if you need. Personally I would use "Cig moch" for "Pork" whereas as "Porc" is a borrowing from English, but it's fine to use (Note that the pronunciation of "Porc" is cymricized). "Ham" is just "Ham".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanGordon12

Thanks for that. I am aware of the shortcomings of google translate, but it does have its uses sometimes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
EllisVaughan
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Either way, are you aware of some more reliable dictionaries?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanGordon12

We've got a couple of small dead tree ones, but pointers to which ones are good (electronic and dead tree) would still be appreciated. Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc
ibisc
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The 'Modern Welsh Dictionary' (Gareth King) is a good one for learners - some good examples of use in various contexts. It also has quite a few explanatory boxes on particular points of usage.

I would second EllisV's mention of Geiriadur Gomer i'r Ifainc, too.

Google Translate's Welsh is often very peculiar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
EllisVaughan
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Starting with electronic, by far the most practical for learners is "Ap geiriaduron" by Bangor university. It's on IOS and android and will de-mutate a word or de-conjugate a verb to give you the base form. A couple of others are "Geiriadur yr Academi" (Though not a personal fan) and "Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru" (Though this is more designed for native/fluent speakers). "Y Gweiadur" is a very good option too except it's in beta and requires a log which they have closed the applications for.

In print "The Welsh learners dictionary" by Heini Gruffudd is the main learners dictionary I have lying around and it's okay but sometimes I find it has a weird choice of vocabulary. My main print dictionary is "Geiriadur Gomer i'r Ifanc" (Gomer's dictionary for the young) which once again is mainly for native speakers, but it does have an English to Welsh section at the back, but for the most part consists of Welsh words with Welsh definitions and translations into English (it also has some nice pictures).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanGordon12

Thanks for that. I was aware of "Ap geiriaduron", and thought I had it installed, but apparently I didn't. Carole (my wife) does have it on her iPad. GPC I already have on my iPad. As for the paper dictionaries, the two we currently have are the Heini Gruffudd (which lives permanently in my pocket when we visit Wales, ever since I bought it when we were there for Carole to attend a job interview) and the Gareth King.

1 year ago
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