"Prego"

Translation:You are welcome

2/27/2013, 8:59:47 PM

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mrule
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I translated this literally as "I pray" -- which I think better captures the flexibility with which "prego" is used in Italian. I have been informed that it can be used in many contexts, including "you're welcome", "what can I do for you?" and "please". It seems like "Prego" can be used whenever you might say "I pray", "pray", or "god be with you", in English. True, I don't see these used much outside of religious communities in America, but I figure since Italy has a long history with Catholicism, the expression "I pray" has stuck around?

edit: when it says that prego translates literally to "I pray", is this in a religious sense, or just in the sense of "I beg"?

10/21/2013, 11:22:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/TiagoMoita_PT
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Considering this is a lesson about politeness, another answer would be expected, but yours is still correct. You should report it. I've tried "After you" (see http://www.wordreference.com/iten/prego) and it was also incorrectly marked wrong.

6/7/2015, 9:03:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DiakS.

Have you ever thought about the literal sense of "please"? Or the actual meaninglessness of "You are welcome?" The general present meaning of "please" is result of a transfer of domain, certainly linked to religion, it has just lost the religious aspect of "humbly asking for".

2/28/2018, 10:08:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/abeceda

I wrote "please" and it is also correct

3/9/2013, 6:20:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax
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Yes, as long as you are not requesting something. It is correct in the context 'Please have a seat.'

When I visited Italy, the waiters often used prego; when they set your plate of food in front of you, they often say 'Prego'.

3/28/2015, 10:31:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveVelo1

You might say it's a Swiss army knife sort of polite word. I live in Italy and it's often used as a kind gesture. Like, if you're standing in line and there's an elderly woman behind you holding groceries, you might offer to have her go ahead of you by saying "prego".

3/6/2016, 5:46:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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Interesting conversation here. I find it insightful that the verb «pregare» means "to pray," so «prego» is the conjugation "I pray." This reminds me of in older English polite speech when people asked others to do something using the word "pray," e.g. "Pray tell." I guess Italian took it to the next level by "praying" to everyone that they eat the served food or go in front of them in line, etc. In this way, "pray" is indeed another way of saying "please."

3/6/2016, 7:29:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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In 17th & 18th century English literature (imported into North America), the phrase "Prithee" (contraction of "pray thee") appears and is used much in the same way as "please" when not asking for something. "Prithee, take thy place at table."

7/2/2016, 7:19:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/moreno174
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Like the policemen: "Favorisca i documenti, prego"

3/7/2016, 10:02:31 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcomero
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and.... not at all? it is correct?

7/19/2014, 6:01:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TangoBroad

Yes, it certainly should be!

5/5/2015, 4:29:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill
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My answer, but not accepted. Reported.

11/18/2015, 12:10:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TangoBroad

Isn't this the place to report mistakes? For example "not at all" is a perfectly good translation for "prego".

5/5/2015, 4:29:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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The place to report mistakes is the button next to the discussion thread button that says something like, "Report a mistake." In Italian, there also exists a different expression for "not at all:" «Niente.» or «Per niente.».

5/9/2015, 11:06:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441
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It could be interesting to know that the formula derives from Latin (so NOT from the Church). In the final of the letters it was common to use "sit tibi gratia", "be grace to you", which means just thank, have gratitude; or even "" sufficit tibi gratia mea , gratia Dei tecum " (= my kindness is with you, the favour of God be with you); "precor" (hence please) has the same derivation and means good wishes: "longum diem " a wish of long life. Anyway is a reply to your "thanks", which, to my ears, is not liked with the fact that I am, or not, "welcome"....

12/6/2015, 11:08:49 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/umslopogas

You refused " please" for prego but it is correct

5/19/2015, 7:53:32 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HarlemRealist1

i typed 'welcome' it says it's incorrect that it should be 'you are welcome' i swear this messed

10/12/2016, 3:57:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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That is correct. "Welcome" as in welcoming people into your home would be «Benvenuto/-a/-i/-e».

10/12/2016, 5:20:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmacd
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Nel Regno Unito si dice "Don't mention it" anziché che "You're welcome" negli Stati Uniti. DL non acceta la prima. L'ho riferito.

1/11/2018, 3:14:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441
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(...."accetta" two ts...)

1/11/2018, 3:42:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmacd
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Thanks!

2/13/2018, 12:01:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EstelleTweedie
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In SA we often say "It's a pleasure" when we're thanked - would that work?

10/11/2014, 8:46:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/moreno174
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'You are welcome' is 'Lei è il benvenuto', not a simply 'prego' Litteraly.

2/3/2016, 9:55:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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...? Not all phrases should be translated literally. (Also, you would not include the «il» since, in the English sentence, "welcome" is an adjective.)

2/4/2016, 5:04:07 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/moreno174
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"Lei è il/la benvenuto/a" is the top of formality. Never said phrases like this. : ) "Lei è benvenuto/a" it's ok A simply "benvenuto/a" is perfect for 'Welcome' "Prego" have so many meanings but...ok

2/4/2016, 10:06:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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Really? I never heard it said before. Haha. Grazie.

2/5/2016, 12:51:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Slaughcl

"Prego" was a confusing word for me when I visited Italy. I thought it only meant "you're welcome", so I was a bit perplexed when the man working at the gelato stand greeted me with "Prego!".

5/13/2016, 2:46:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeGGP1

So far there are 3 words/phrases for "please". Can either be used in any circumstance or are they used in specific cases. Grazie.

Per favore Per piacere Prego

3/9/2017, 4:56:42 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441
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Per favore and per piacere are interchangeable, one meaning: “I ask this to your benevolence/ kindliness”, and the other, “I ask you this to have a personal pleasure”. For “prego” (that means “I pray you”) it depends, as it can signify different things: 1) as a reply to a "thanks" = don’t mention it/ not at all/my pleasure/ you're welcome; 2) as a question, it means: pardon?/ sorry?/ repeat please?; 3) as a polite phrase = please; letting somebody pass first = after you; giving the way: "Come in/ please": 4) in a shop they can say “prego?” = "Can I help you"?

3/9/2017, 9:08:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeGGP1

Grazie, Berto. Molto utile.

3/9/2017, 4:56:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mells74

Why is you're welcome not correct....it's just an abbreviated version of you are welcome!?

5/16/2017, 4:40:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MojcaAbram

Prego is please in italian!

11/28/2017, 9:19:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sigira0

I wrote "Do not mention it" and was marked wrong - tried to report and there was no space for "My answer should be accepted" so told them their answer was unnatural :-)

2/4/2018, 9:25:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeManu1

I thought you were supposed to accept anglicisms. You are welcome is not only American, it makes the English wince. I cannot believe that you have never come across, Don't mention it.

5/27/2018, 4:13:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferMa316095
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I don't understand why only one lesson per section. It is not going to help anyone learn a new language. You are being too lazy.

10/21/2018, 7:44:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RodParker-
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+1 for 'don't mention it'. This is definitely what I (and other English people) would say in situations in which Italians use 'prego'.

12/8/2018, 5:22:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterJacks144506

When I visited the Sistine Chapel a security guard asked somebody to stop taking pictures of the ceiling. He said: "Prego, prego.'' He clearly wasn't saying you are welcome'. He meant I beg you, or I implore you or in a more British English vernacular,do me a favour'.

1/15/2019, 6:02:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/nickynina

it says i am wrong just because i wrote "WELCOME" instead of "YOU ARE WELCOME" :D COME OOOOONNNN !!!!!

2/27/2013, 8:59:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/temporalthings

"Welcome" and "you're welcome" mean two different things. One is benvenuto , the other is prego. "You're welcome" can mean "welcome", but you're far likelier to hear it in the context of being welcome to ask for other favours (i.e. in response to thank you).

5/7/2013, 10:57:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill
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But not so much in British English, where you're more likely to hear "Not at all" or "Don't mention it."

11/18/2015, 12:13:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441
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...as that evil tongue of Bernard Shaw wrote: "GB and USA are two countries divided by the same language"...

2/3/2016, 10:06:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill
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But it all adds to the richness of the language - this website may be of interest to you: http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/

2/3/2016, 1:09:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441
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Thanks. But what is written does not change the fact that the two expressions not only are different, but mean also two different thoughts. I can say "don't mention it" also to people that I would avoid, in other words that are all except "welcome". More than richness, personally I would call these facts "confusion".

2/3/2016, 1:50:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/birkos
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I put don't mention it My Italian teacher says that is acceptable but Duolingo knows better!!

6/8/2017, 6:43:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/LeandroSab4

Grazie

2/16/2016, 5:00:37 AM
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