https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot

"Where can I use Spanish?" More places than you may think.

DragonPolyglot
  • 25
  • 19
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 154

A common question in classrooms in general is "when and where can we use this?". The word "this" can be anything; math, formatting guidelines, knowledge about the cardiovascular system, or a foreign language. We tend to just ask where all the native speakers are that can help you speak the language, but actually there are several more places you can use Spanish. Take a look at the map:

Explanation for the colors:

  • Bolivia has a total of 38 Official languages by law, most of them indigenous. Similarly, Peru has two other official languages, and Paraguay lists Guarani as an official language.
  • The blue circles are Andorra (between Spain and France, official language Catalan) and Belize (whose official language is English)
  • Puerto Rico's other official language is English
  • Some states in the United States recognize Spanish as a minority language by law, while others don't.
  • Chile and Argentina both have unrecognized territory in Antarctica. These areas are mostly inhabited by scientists, and you can get your passport stamped in these places.
  • Equatorial Guinea is a country in Africa whose official languages are Spanish, French and Portuguese. Spanish is used as the national language.
  • The Philippines, by law, lists Spanish as an "optional" language along with Arabic.
  • The red areas are all places where Spanish is the sole official language de facto or de jure (By fact or by law)

What do you think about this map? What surprised you? Does this show accurately why Spanish is the 3rd most spoken language in the world?

I hope you found this interesting. :)

1 year ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SundownOftheEast

Note on the Philippines

Although we have been colonized by the Spaniards for 333 (illuminati confirmed) the Spanish speakers here are quite rare. Regardless of us being under the Spanish rule for 3 decades, the language itself was not openly available for common folk for they were only taught basic Spanish, enough to understand the orders of Spaniards and not being able to rebel. The language was made exclusive for the elites, the religious, and the insulares (Full-blooded Spaniards born in the colonies of Spain). And along with other reasons like, the coming of the Americans (making English open to the Filipinos), and Japanese (during their colonization, it was also when the Tagalog language had its golden age, to suppress the learning of English).

However, there are certain cities like Cavite City, Ternate, Zamboanga (majority) and Ermita which have citizens that speak broken Spanish, a mixture of Filipino and Spanish, they call it "Chabacano". They use same rules as the Spanish language only that they made adjustments with their own. Still, it sounds very Spanish, I can't even understand them.

We also have a lot of borrowed Spanish words and expression like antyohos (antejohos), senyor/senyora and senyorita (we also use "ñ" but we usual interchange them with "ny"), pwede (puede), abante (avante), kumusta (¿Cómo estás?) etc.

So in my opinion, you really can't use Spanish here in the Philippines, except of course if your are in the cities that speak Chabacano, but the map was correct in saying Spanish is a minority here, but its not that minority one would most likely expect.

link below is an image where Chabacano / broken Spanish is spoken.

https://www.google.com.ph/imgres?imgurl=https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/Idioma_chabacano.png/220px-Idioma_chabacano.pngimgrefurl=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chavacanoh=352w=220tbnid=Abp7liNWzlSWLM:tbnh=160tbnw=100usg=__Zmhz5bIfHQtp8x1PhOMUM1G1U3E=vet=10ahUKEwj_hbmWlZnTAhUCX5QKHYZdAMoQ9QEIHjAA..idocid=u5JpuJz53fOSIMsa=Xved=0ahUKEwj_hbmWlZnTAhUCX5QKHYZdAMoQ9QEIHjAA#h=352imgdii=UwaW4gOybyeocM:tbnh=160tbnw=100vet=10ahUKEwj_hbmWlZnTAhUCX5QKHYZdAMoQ9QEIHjAA..iw=220

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EpicPowerHero

That'll come in handy if I ever live in Antarctica.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick.-
Patrick.-
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 8

LOL.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spiritomb

Isn't Spanish spoken in Gibraltar (British Overseas Territory) and as a small minority in Western Sahara and Northern Morocco?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
  • 25
  • 19
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 154

Yes, however Gibraltar is an odd case since it doesn't legally recognize Spanish but over 80% of the population speak it, and it is geographically connected to Spain anyway.

From what I understand, many Northern Moroccans are taught some Spanish. Arabic, Berber and even French greatly overshadow the use of Spanish in Morocco.

Western Sahara, being disputed territory, is somewhat of a touchy subject. Most of the Spanish speakers in Western Sahara are ethnic Sahrawi that learn Spanish as a second language and speak Arabic or Berber as a native language, and many Sahrawi have fled Western Sahara for refuge, where Spanish education isn't provided. That is why I didn't mark that area on the map.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/81cheney
81cheney
  • 17
  • 13
  • 8
  • 6

You're right about that. It has more or less faded out in Northern Morocco. It's stronger in Western Sahara though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SundownOftheEast

oh the politics and conflicts in the Gibraltar straight. made me remember my college days and Politics classes. Anyone living there?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick.-
Patrick.-
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 8

I'm Peruvian, so I'm not surprised.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kmpala
kmpala
  • 25
  • 21
  • 3
  • 2
  • 745

New Mexico should have special shading - nobody asks the teachers here how/when they can use Spanish. :-) Not only does New Mexico have the highest population of Hispanics of any of the United States, we are by law a bilingual state. I grew up here and started learning Spanglish en la calle cuando yo era un niño.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TafR4

You can find spanish-speaking people EVERYWHERE around the world. Welcome to globalization.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0000666ttt

cool...

1 year ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.