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  5. "Ingawaje alilala alisikia"

"Ingawaje alilala alisikia"

Translation:Although he slept she heard

April 10, 2017

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s.rombaut

Why the je in ingawaje?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baziraake

It is just an alternative to ingawa!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ForkyMcSpoon

The English sentence sounds strange. It's unusual for "hear" to be used without a complement unless the complement is understood (e.g. "Did you know that X?" "I heard."). Is the meaning something like "Although he was sleeping, he heard (that)"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoladeIgba

It is a simple mistake. I guess the writers meant that "Although she slept, she heard."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gazelle1596

My best guess: "Although he/she slept, he/she heard (was able to hear - what was happening/we spoke)."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian999251

Perhaps the biggest head-scratcher in the entire Swahili series.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jemef

"Although he slept he could hear." -

is the gist of the Swahili (as too of at least one other Bantu language): the shortcoming here, as elsewhere in this course, is in the translation.

That's to say: the Swahili sentence is correct (with he --- he , or she --- she; not he --- she, she --- he), and the English ought to be as above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/billhatcher

Using the above Swahili sentence as an example, a comma might help distinguish clauses, thereby making sentences more intelligible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TessEwing1

Yes but the software doesn't seem to understand commas. It doesn't care if you put punctuation or not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DengMadut

Would you use akasikia instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gazelle1596

the -ka- tense is the consecutive, so in consecutive actions (usually when telling a story) - and in that case "ingawa" wouldn't make sense either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

As Gazelle1596 explained, that wouldn't make sense. It would be like saying "Although she slept and then she heard".

-ka- connects equally ranked actions/states, so if you used akasikia, the sentence is unfinished because you haven't finished the "although" clause.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brezbrez

It makes no logical sense in the English translation. Is it supposed to mean 'Although she/he(typo error in the above example), slept she/he had (already) heard?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gazelle1596

No, that would have been "amesikia" and then wouldn't make logical sense either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

Yep, or alikuwa amesikia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TessEwing1

It does not accept "although he slept he heard", which at least would make some sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsimonds

If the content creators really did intend a he / she difference in the two clauses, they should have used a pair of words like (baba, mama). I would have written, "Ingawa baba alikuwa amelala, mama alisikia." ~ Although Dad was asleep, Mom heard (the noise). As they stand, I have some doubts about both the Swahili sentence and the English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Francis795959

Strange sentence....

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