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"Yo pago tus estudios."

Translation:I pay for your education.

5 years ago

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/captaingimpy

also the (for) is implicit in pagar

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sys
sys
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Thank you for the clarification!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/priella1

It also takes both:

I pay for your studies.

I pay for your education.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BPS-PenuelO

Weird... it accepts "I pay your studios"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

Ikr that's what I said, just for your studios

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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It's 'studios' that is incorrect for this sentence in English. It should be 'studies'.

I like your screen name! :-D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

Heh thx and I put in studos and it worked, just one of those things I guess.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tohabath

(From Wordnik) "Studio (n.): An establishment where an art is taught or studied".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BPS-PenuelO

Thanks, but I know what a studio is. It's just that I initially thought "Yo pago tus estudios" had one weird translation, but I get it now :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

It should accept "studio.". This dictionary says "studio" (apartment) is one translation.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/estudio

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aumbria

Why would i pay for your atudies?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anniewicker

pagar is always with 'for' understood?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rotofer

What is the difference in English between 'I pay your studies' and 'I pay for your studies'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glennonrp

In English, you wouldn't say the first one. You pay for things. You might pay a fee or pay attention or pay someone's way. But, if it is a thing you are giving money for, you say you pay for it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slydiad
Slydiad
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I entirely agree with glennonrp, as a native English speaker I would never ever say "I pay your studies." It's slightly more complicated than always paying "for" things, though. You "pay for" any particular thing that you are buying, but there are also things, often more general ideas, that you just "pay." I pay my bills, I pay my own way, I pay admission to the museum for myself and the kids, I pay your tuition (which was my first attempt at translating this & lost me a heart).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauroQuil
MauroQuil
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"I pay x" x is direct object (receiving the money or the amount of money to be payed) "I pay for x" x is indirect object (thing that is being exchanged for the money) "I pay you fifty dollars for your dirty socks" said the groupie to Usain Bolt. (now somebody has to tell me if it is possible to have two direct objects in this sentence or if I defined things wrong)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Mauro, you defined things correctly. You is an indirect object, dollars is direct. Pagar is one word with the "for" included. Its object is a direct object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"I pay you fifty dollars for your socks." "Fifty dollars" is the direct object. "You" is the indirect object. "for your socks" is a prepositional phrase; "socks" is the object of the preposition. It is not a direct object.

http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/indirectobject.htm

As this next source says, "don't confuse the indirect object with the object of a preposition."

How can you tell if a word is an indirect object or the object of the preposition?

If it comes just after a preposition – then it's the object of the preposition. Also, the indirect object is usually followed by the direct object. The object of the preposition does not.

http://www.really-learn-english.com/english-direct-object-indirect-object-and-object-of-the-preposition.html

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DailyGrace

Thanks so much! I have been overwhelmed by the many types of pronouns (subject, d.o., i.o.,object of prep, possessive, possessive object, reflexive...so far). This is helpful! Do you know of any charts to make this more simple?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluffieduck

"I pay for your classes." would be an acceptable translation in American English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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It may be an acceptable sentence and in some circs may equate very well to the correct translation - on this thread Eros suggests 'schooling' similarly and I could throw in 'lessons' - but you have to accept yours like the other two examples I give is a blatantly incorrect translation of 'estudios' . Have you people never done a translation exercise? Or even noticed the nuanced differences inEnglish between words of similar meaning?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Good questions/ points. However, actually in this case, I believe it is NOT an acceptable translation. See my comments below.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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To me the English here is slightly different to what the accepted translation describes, but I do wonder if your meaning is also carried by the spanish phrase.

¿ Hay unos hispanohablantes que pueden respuesta eso por favor ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Basically not. "classes" = "clases".

Not all "studies" are "classes." I might "study" or "apprentice" under someone, or some organization without taking traditional "classes."

Or I might study on my own. I am studying Spanish on Duolingo, but I am not taking a class.

Although the author could have, or might have, used other words, the author did not. Translate as the author DID SAY, not as they could or might have said.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cascudo
Cascudo
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Ei, pagar se pronuncia con una p y no una h. Yo no oigo la p

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s_helmer

Yo tambien.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

You want tampoco, not también.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silvermist03

Sounds like a parent guilt trip ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Are we paying for more than one person's education here? Why are "tus" and "estudios" plural? Shouldn't it be, "I pay for your educations?" I know I've heard people say that when they are talking to more than one person.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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We know that it is only one person because tu/tus is second person singular. Studies = schooling, education in this sentence. As in English for this meaning, 'studies (estudios)' has to be plural, and so your studies = tus estudios. In addition, 'education' is very rarely made plural, but if it were and you were talking to more than one person, it would have to be 'sois/sus educaciones' April 2 2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Thanks, Eloise23. My mind went blank for a moment -- I remember now! Your little icon is cute. Is that the character Eloise who lived in the hotel? I loved those books when I was small! Have a lingot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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You are most welcome! Thank you! I occasionally get brain flops, too. Yes, that is Eloise of the Plaza Hotel in NYC. I always thought she was a little too naughty, but I loved her adventures anyway. I have a volume of all of Eloise's stories to peruse occasionally. :-D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

I don't remember much about Eloise's personality; I mainly remember that I wanted to live in her hotel!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrjenna
mrjenna
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Mom?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Waterip0
Waterip0
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The majority of us had to have thought something along those lines

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasZhang

Hi, is it that pagar por sth pagar tu/mi/nuestro ... sth

I mean, the in the second case there is no need of "por"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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PAGAR contains the 'POR'. No extra POR's needed. :=)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j-james
j-james
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it accepted "I pay your studies" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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9 Oct 2015 - It really should not.

Having said that, though, "I pay your tuition" AND "I pay for your tuition" both sound acceptable to me. It's always "I pay FOR your books/tickets/education/shoes/drinks/pet owl/vacations/etc".

If you leave FOR out, you get "I pay Miguel/the bank/the barista/ etc" The difference can be seen in, "I pay the barista for the coffee". The barista is receiving the payment directly, in exchange for the coffee. FOR indicates what is received.

While I'm not sure what the pattern is here in English, I recommend using "pay for" as the default translation of "pagar" when it has an object.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Disco2000_T

I think in the sentence 'i pay your tuition', 'tuition' is effectively short for 'tuition fees', so it works the same way as 'i pay my bills' 'i pay your wages' 'i pay a debt' - no 'for' needed where the thing being paid is a monetary object of some kind.

In 'i pay for your tuition', tuition = the classes etc. you will receive, so works the same way as paying 'for' other things.

I'd also add, as a Brit, that the first version 'I pay your tuition' sounds very American. Here 'I pay your fees' is much more common.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveDeasy

The new male speaking voice makes it sound like "estuvias". I thought Duo was giving me another sneak attack new word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Hmm... are you using the app or the website version of Duolingo? I've always heard people talking about a Duo male voice but I never had that. Thanks :).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Filiper2
Filiper2
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I use the app and website (I think) and have both a male and female voice. It began in what I believe was an update a few month ago, when new words or lessons were added. On another note, I noticed that in the Spanish reverse to English tree people are still down voting. Some people do not like constructive criticism.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveDeasy

App.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Thanks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ssophd
ssophd
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Would you, Duolingo? PLEASE!! :(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joan-oh-no

mother are you here too?!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rotofer

It doesn't accept "I pay your studies"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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Well, it shouldn't really. That would mean you are giving money to the studies. You don't pay the studies themselves, you pay FOR the studies.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoHablaEspanol11

Wrong wrong wrong!

"I pay your studies" is a valid expression and means the same as "I pay for your studies".

It's just that's it's uncommon in American English, but it's not incorrect.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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"I pay your studies" is so uncommon that I've never come across it in many decades as an Anglophone. Something can be grammatically correct and still grate on native speakers' ears.

I also find Wrong wrong wrong! unnecessary for communication, and downright rude.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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remember that "pagar" = to pay FOR. So "yo pago" = I pay FOR....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Yo pago = I pay for. ...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BPS-PenuelO

And yet, it accepts "I pay your studios"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Disco2000_T

Silly duo!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/riotgorl

Am I not understanding the nuance in "Yo pago" to mean either "I pay for" or "I will pay"? Maybe I'm not catching the difference in conjugation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DXabier
DXabier
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"I pay for"="yo pago" and "I will pay" = "yo pagaré"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazzdragon022

as DXabier says. The difference is "I pay for" is present tense and "I will pay for" is future tense. example: "I pay for your studies this year" vs "I will pay for your studies next year"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s_helmer

voy a pagar is will pay and pago is I pay.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mr_andresrios

Yo pago-I pay for. Yo pagaré-I'll pay for. Yo pagué-I payed for.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heartlandexpat

I feel like I will pay for your schooling is the most natural option, but it doesn't take it. Darn. There's no reason why that's wrong, is there?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjhukill

Pago is present tense. So, I pay or I am paying would be correct. I will pay is future tense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelA.M899803

What are you trying to say here, Duo?

1 month ago