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https://www.duolingo.com/hosscomp

Flash Point

Hi. I am now at level 8. Spanish is my first language to study other than English, but I can imagine that at some point down the tree one would reach a "flash point," a point where enough of the spoken language can be understood that learning will continue automatically with or without further lessons. That, of course, is assuming one is exposed to the new language regularly. My question to those who have learned a second language on DL is: Is this true? If so, Is there a particular level neighborhood where that point is reached?

4 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

Levels are not directly linked to the tree, level is based on XP's gained. Since there are other ways to gain points without touching your tree, you shouldnt really link the two in your mind. As for a "flash point", I am not sure how true that is, or if it would be the same relative location for everyone, if at all. It might happen for some people, I guess.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hosscomp

Too bad the levels aren't directly linked with the tree. It seems it would be more beneficial to track the level of comprehension than to track the amount of effort put into it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OldSpiceGuy
OldSpiceGuy
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There's definitely a point where it clicks - i.e. you can hear something and actually process the gist of what's being said without knowing everything, and without actually translating. I was probably 1/2 way down the tree when I started trying to watch anything (I started with Spanish Pocoyo on YouTube). I finished the tree a few months back. I now find that I pick up a few words from reading through context, though I still like to have google translator to verify new words. I still haven't gotten to the point that I can easily pick up new words from spoken Spanish - my brain still struggles to understand what it does know.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Well, I would say that, as long as you can understand part of the sentence, you can get part of the meaning and thus you can learn and this will happen at very early stages.

However, the "flash point" I understand is when you are proficient enough not to need external help and, for instance, being able to infer meanings and expressions. This happens (as far as I can tell) at the C1 level. If you are not familiar with this classification please have a look here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_European_Framework_of_Reference_for_Languages and is along C2 when I would say you are on the self ignition point, as you are effectively independent because not only you know the grammar, but you have it "internalized" (sorry for the bad pun, the grammar does not spark any good feelings on me, but certainly is the external source you need to get the flame going, whether you like it or not)

Now, where does DL bring you? this was discussed endlessly in forums when DL was released and died out and comes up now and then... I insist that no higher than A1. The reason is that, while you may get some rules on your head and some vocab, will by no means help you on getting a conversation. and translating Wikipedia either.

Still, it can be fun, the forum can help and you can get interested in the language and link with other materials.

In any case, have fun!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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@ RAMOSRAUL, I can easily read B1 and B2 material. My conversation skills aren't that high, but that is because I was unable to move the last 1/3 of the tree into long term memory and didn't properly research what things like "modal" and "subjunctive" meant. So, I've started over. I feel I will be more equipped once I make it through a second time. I think what is missing is some of the vocabulary for a strong B1. But, that feels like a less arduous task than learning conjugation and grammar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hosscomp

Good to hear. Well, how many native speakers know how to conjugate or even what it means? I would guess that in the neighborhood of age two most children have reached the "flash point" as I am thinking of it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Well, congrats :) Sounds as if you're getting proper advance there. Keep it up!

Regarding the comment of hosscomp, by the age of 10 everyone in the public school system must know all the conjugations. They also get the basics on what is what, grammatically speaking. They get the irregular verbs, genders and such rules properly grilled by then.

Before leaving the compulsory education, everyone must be able to do grammar analysis of mid level... which means subordinate sentences at least.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hosscomp

Thanks. Good reverence.

4 years ago