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  5. "Mtu mwingine tafadhali"

"Mtu mwingine tafadhali"

Translation:Another person please

April 12, 2017

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marisja7

I wonder when I could use this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EileenRaff2

I wondered too. It might be that it could be used in queues in the sense normally expressed in English by next to indicate that a service position has become free (next person please). Not sure though - that's just a guess. A few recent phrases have seemed simply nonsensical or non-usable in real life and just used to illustrate a grammatical point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sgunnestad

Terrible English! Why is this not corrected? "Next, please"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5vZSXEt5

I wonder whether it's not better to keep it like that, so that we learn what the word actually means. I guess it would be best to have several examples of how you can use the word in different situations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsimonds

"Next, please" and perhaps "Next in line, please" should be accepted as correct answers, IF that is what mtu mwingine tafadhali means. On the other hand, if it means, "Please bring me someone else because I can't deal with this person", or something similar, then that needs to be explained. We need a native speaker to tell us what the intended meaning is here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5vZSXEt5

Anybody an idea why it's "Wanafunzi wengine", And "mtu mwingine"?

Why is there once an E and once an I behind the W? wEngine vs mwIngine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

As I understand it, the original word for the plural would have been "waingine" (with an 'i') but the 'a' and 'i' long ago elided into 'e', which gives "wengine". This is a common vowel change pattern in Swahili. I don't have a reference but I know I have read it in several textbooks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_nmordaunt

Haha yes. This didn't puzzle me because of my exposure to other Bantu languages, such as Zulu and Shona, in which this elision occurs.

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