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"Nasz kraj ma silną gospodarkę."

Translation:Our country has a strong economy.

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1 year ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Is this word somehow related to Russian "Gospodin (Господин) "?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gerardd88
Gerardd88
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Gospodarz in Polish means host. It apparently comes from Proto-Slavic * gospodь meaning 'lord, master'. In Old Polish you can find a word gospodzin, meaning Lord, Sir (you can find it in Bogurodzica). With time it came to mean "host (master of the house), head of the family". The suffix -arz indicates the person performing an action. The word for economy itself comes from the word gospodarstwo (household).

Also the Proto-Slavic * gospodь is a compound itself (from gostъ-pod-ъ) with roots in Proto-Indo-European, so the Polish word gość and Russian гость (both meaning guest) also have the same root.

6
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Okcydent
Okcydent
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Probably yes. The word Gospodarka is linked with:

  • gospodarz - (a) host, (b) farmer that has his own gospodarstwo (farm) (c) owner of hotel/hostel etc
  • gospodyni - feminine gospodarz
  • gospodarstwo - (a) farm (b) household
  • gospoda - inn, tavern
  • gospodarzyć - to farm
  • gospodarować - to administrate an economy, to manage; to farm
  • gospodarny - thrifty, economical
  • niegospodarny - wasteful, uneconomical
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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Great answers! Many thanks indeed!!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

Etymologically, yes. They are both derived from the same Slavic root. In the 15th century, a 'gospodarz' was the 'head of the household'. The word gospodarstwo (household, farm) is derived from that. I believe that gospodarka ("household" of a country) was in turn derived from gospodarstwo, but I'm not 100% sure about that.

2
Reply1 year ago