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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belstar128

Is it normal for me to progress so fast.

Hello im new here i started duolingo 2 days ago and i really like it i have spend hours on here i have done almost 40% of the tree but i see that it takes most people a lot longer then that so im not sure if this is the correct way to learn a language.

At this pace i will have completed the Spanish tree before next week that does not seem right sorry if this was a stupid question but i never tried to learn another language except for English i learned that language when i was 7.

April 17, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

There is no right or wrong way to learn a language. Just make sure you don't forget everything you already learned.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainCIarky

Ye there is. Babbel is the wrong way

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hughcparker

I think that's an odd statement. It's pretty clear that some approaches to language learning work better than others. I've certainly changed the way I do certain things since I started using Duolingo.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

Perhaps I should clarify. It seems that what the best approach is changes based on who's trying.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hughcparker

Even then, I'm somewhat skeptical. Different people have different preferences, personalities, and experiences, sure, but humans have human brains, and there is a lot of commonality.

A lot of things are true for all of us: repetition works, but only if it's thoughtful; there's a right time to revise each word; it's better to practise in more smaller chunks, rather than fewer big chunks; it's better to learn words in context in sentences, rather than on their own (mostly); etc etc.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainCIarky

Doesn't really matter how u do it. Just make sure u keep all the skills golden before starting a new one or you will forget them.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Espatially

It's easy to breeze through any language course, but if you do not slow down and take your time, and PRACTICE repeatedly, you will not retain what you learned. It's easy to remember something for 2 minutes to complete a lesson, but will you remember this 40% if you come back to it in 2 weeks?

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mekeliki

Finishing the tree is one thing. Keeping all medallions gold over time is another. Everyone has their own way. Some people fly through the lessons, then they go back and keep the tree gold. Others, like me, keep all the discs gold every day and progress slowly. Either way you do it there's no getting around putting in lots of hours. That is why Duolingo rewards streaks with lingots, and your level moves up based on xp which you can only gain from doing new lessons and strengthening old ones. Someone who is a level 25 in a language has obviously put in the time (unless they were already fluent and tested through a ton of it from the start).

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

You can't really test your way anywhere close to level 25 ;)

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mekeliki

I didn't really think so. I am already fluent in Spanish and tested only to level 8. German has been a grind and I'm at 15. So, yeah, I totally believe you! :-)

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horako224

Never. And i repeat NEVER rush a course. There is nowhere to run, try to to your course slowly so you can remmeber things, this is the wors mistake new learners make.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

This seems to pre-suppose that going through fast initially would result in some particularly negative consequence. Other than perhaps being a somewhat sub-optimal use of time with regard to overall learning outcomes, I don't really think that's true. And I think it's the case that Duolingo actually becomes a more useful tool once you've gone through all the lessons of a tree once ("finished" in the common, but I think misdirected characterization). I get a lot more translations into target language when reviewing on trees I've "finished" vs. ones where I haven't. I was going through my Dutch tree "slowly," i.e. on a course to hit I think level 24 by the time I finished the last skill. But I was still getting very few translations into Dutch. But in Catalan, for example, where I was doing things probably somewhat less thoroughly but have "finished" the tree, I get a lot more, so that review I think is much more useful.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hughcparker

The potential downside I can see is that leaving yourself with huge amounts of revision to do can be overwhelming, and revising at appropriate times can get very difficult. New activities can also get difficult, because they depend on words that have been forgotten.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

It seems to me that the amount of revision actually required to make words stick is largely sufficient to make Duo's spaced-repetition system largely non-functional anyway (e.g. I think I've had only one skill degild in my third-finished Hungarian tree this year, despite not having done more than maybe 100 XP of work on it, and that's without ever having gotten good enough to be able to reliably do even the the transcription exercises). But you're right, people are highly responsive to Duo's fairly arbitrary (i.e. presumably optimized for user retention, not learning rate) color indications and whatnot.

Of course, the kind of person on track to finish the Spanish tree in less than a week is probably in a better position than most to handle the reviewing "burden" that will arise!

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellie-369

I think it depends on the language, how well you know it, and maybe the lessons

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffryEvan

if you already know that language before then its normal, I finish my English tree in a day. but if you new to that language, I doubt you can master that in 2 days. Completing a tree is easy, but you might forgot all that stuff in a month if your goal is "finish a tree" and not "learn a new language"

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belstar128

Yea i should repeat the lower tests every few days i keep forgetting certain words when i need them but they all come back when i start practicing and then i wonder why i had forgotten them in the first place.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kansokusha

I think everything is pretty much already said here, but I second "no.name.42"'s motion: keep that knowledge strong and healthy, you don't want to lose it over time.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

I've breezed through a number of trees. I had my reasons: long term comprehensive retention not really among them. If that's your goal, I'd recommend going through the tree skill by skill until you can get all the way through several timed practices in each. This (as opposed to the fairly meaningless color scheme) actually indicates a certain level of knowledge. Feel free to go through all the skills first once if you feel like it, though. Doesn't really matter a lick one way or the other! Have fun!

April 17, 2017
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