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  5. "Do not go through the door."

"Do not go through the door."

Translation:Gehe nicht durch die Tür.

February 28, 2013

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rilianxi

Why doesn't nicht go at the end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I don't think nicht ever goes to the end.

It's usually after the verb, unless there's a personal pronoun there.

If there isn't much after the verb, then that might (coincidentally) be the end of the sentence.

For example, Ich liebe dich nicht. "I don't love you". The nicht is right after the verb and the following personal pronoun dich. And coincidentally at the end of the sentence, but not because it wants to go to the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clarehuren

I don't get it, Actually Duo gives many examples of how nicht comes at the last position of the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

I think another point worth raising is the presence of a preposition (or lack thereof).

Usually, when „nicht“ comes directly before a pro/noun it is singling out that element to be negated, and needs to be followed by „sondern“ and the replacement of said element to sound "complete". Zum Beispiel:

„Zünde nicht die Tür an!“
Sounds incomplete, and needs more info to be satisfied, z.B.:

„Zünde nicht die Tür an, sondern das Auto!“
(I won't provide the English translation for any non-German speaking pyromaniacs)

Which means that in a lot of cases, it is best to place „nicht“ after the subject/object(s) for a more general negation; which often leads to „nicht“ going to the end (even though it wasn't "sent" there like an infinitive or past participle in a main clause, or conjugated verb in a subordinate clause) z.B.:

„Zünde die Tür nicht an!“
Which is fine on its own.

However, when the noun is preceded by a preposition, this characteristic of „nicht“ to need a "rebuttal" is dulled to the point where the speaker would have to emphasise the noun with their tone to create this need of a rebuttal; z.B.:

„Gehe nicht durch die Tür.“
Fine.

„Gehe nicht durch die Tür.“
Please, go on.

„Gehe nicht durch die Tür, sondern durchs Tor.“
Ah, viel besser.


I came to this realisation after wrestling between „Geh nicht durch die Tür.“ and „Geh durch die Tür nicht“. Although „Geh nicht durch die Tür.“ came to me first and sounded fine (at first), I started overthinking it and told myself that sentence would need a „sondern“, then got dinged for trying „Geh durch die Tür nicht“.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahmadtos

i cannot recall what sentences included a "nicht" terminal but what i can say is that most of my experience with duolingo had the negative at the end


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleema-Imran

So are Ich liebe nicht divh and Ich liebe dich nicht both correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

On its own you wouldn't say "Ich liebe nicht dich.", but you'd find it in sentences like "Ich liebe nicht dich, sondern jemand anderen." to add a sense of contrast.

"Ich liebe dich nicht." can stand alone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharafFergali

When there is a complement with a preposition, which is the case here (durch), nicht comes before the complement. On the other hand, if there is no preposition, nicht comes after the complement. Ex : ich esse den Apfel nicht. Ich esse nicht mit meinem Vater.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarPevan

Grammar rules says verb + nicht(denies) what is next to it, so it is denying durch die Tür.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarPevan

Ich möchte nicht essen/ich esse nicht


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarPevan

Also ich möchte nicht jeden tag essen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Forger7

„Geh“ should be allowed instead of „Gehe“


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carl_Ramrod

What's the difference between "Geh" and "Gehe" grammatically and connotatively?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Forger7

Geh is simply the shorter Gehe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carl_Ramrod

Is it less formal? Is it like "can't" vs. "cannot" in English, or is it more like "till" vs. "until"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto_Didactyl

I have read that gehe is more old fashioned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MetroWestJP

I had the same question and found this page which explains when the -e on the du imperative form is optional or mandatory. (http://joycep.myweb.port.ac.uk/verbs/imperat.html)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Both are accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WewaPikachu

No, they are not. I was just marked wrong for using "geh" instead of "gehe". So I came here to read and understand why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul-Dieter

Accepted "geh" - 05, Dec. 2019. Gehe was shown as "another correct solution". I did the same; came here to find out why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CathySchmi11

Geh was not accepted on 3 Feb 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeLearntFrench

Geh still not accepted, and apparently can no longer report Feb 24, 2020 "my answer should be accepted". Reporting option is now "My Answer should not be accepted"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EinDeutscherJung

Geh was accepted March 11, 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

@MikeLearntFrench

I am only aware of that reporting option when an answer has been accepted, so I would certainly recommend taking a screenshot and reporting the error as a bug, should that happen again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GustavoLor906776

"Geh nicht durch die Tür" was accepted on 24 April 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoBlackma3

"Geh nicht durch die Tür." accepted 7th May 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_Spaatkauf

I got the 'word bank' version of that question and 'gehe' was the only option. I would have thought the correct answer would have been 'geh'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

Well, in case there's any uncertainty left after reading through this thread, both forms are acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dreamer331

no, they are not! they accept their version "gehe", but in Germany and Austria people say "Geh"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simopr1

like Trink and Trinke?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jloris

That's not the dative case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeenIdle

"durch" requires accusative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArvindhMani

Also i know this doesn't apply in this context, but keep in mind that even if it were a dative-required preposition, since movement is implied, it would become accusative. (Not a native speaker, so please correct me if I'm wrong)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

No, the movement/non-movement issue only applies to two-way prepositions (Wechselpräpositionen). As you actually implied with your statement: if it were a dative-required preposition, then it would require the dative. Always.

So, if the sentence were instead "Go to the door." the German sentence would read:

„Geh(e) zur Tür.“ (zur = zu der)

(Also not a native speaker, but I am confident I know the rule, however I have provided links below (one in German and one in English) as confirmation and for further reading)

mein-deutschbuch.de
germanforenglishspeakers.com


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThenWhatHappened

Why can't I say, "Gehen Sie bitte nicht durch die Tür"? Can't the imperative be formal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

The imperative most certainly can be formal—but here it simply isn't as polite as your sentence:

Gehen Sie nicht durch die Tür.

Should be fine, and if not currently accepted, should be reported :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bthn_kocak

I think the problem is "bitte". You add a "please" although the English sentence doesn't have it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

So if I wanted to get a little fancier, could I say: "Geht bitte noch nicht durch eure Türen!" Please don't go through your doors yet. ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, you could.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjsalcedo01

Duolingo proposes: "Nicht durch die Tür gehen". I cant follow its logic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

Infinitive sentences can be used as an alternative to the imperative, and the meaning is kept the same. This is very common in instruction manuals. I imagine this is done to make the commands come across less direct.

One I have often heard on the German TV shows and in the German films I have watched is „Aufstehen!“.

Now, as „aufstehen“ is a separable verb, the correct way to form the imperative would be one of the following:

„Steh auf!“
„Steht auf!“ or
„Stehen Sie auf!“

But for whatever reason a large number of German speakers seem to prefer the infinitive alternative. Go figure.

Here's an article from the dartmouth.edu site on the imperative, and within that article it mentions the use of infinitives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgzF71

Is "gehe" 2nd person singular or plural? For singular, shouldn't it be "geh"? If you cut over the "st" in the conjugation? And for plural "geht"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Gehe is imperative singular, and has the alternative spelling geh - the existence of two forms for the singular imperative is simply an historical thing, kept around for flexibility in speaking rhythm mostly. Geht is the plural version. Both are informal (to people you would say du to, or call by their first names).

    I recommend bookmarking Canoo.net for looking up grammatical forms: http://canoo.net/inflection/gehen:V:sein


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lexbroch

    http://www.canoonet.eu is now the current URL, there was an update a month or so ago. As this moderator pointed out it is an excellent site for the various grammatical forms of German words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopSixSquish

    THANK YOU. I have been going to canoo.net as directed in so many comments, and they are always dead, so I didn't know if the site was gone forever or not. Have a lingot.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lexbroch

    Canoo.net is now canoonet.eu, I clicked your link, dead end, modified it to http://www.canoonet.eu/inflection/gehen:V:sein , now appears to be working. Canoonet.eu is a great resource, thanks for posting the link.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lexbroch

    At this point it seems that Canoonet.eu has been absorbed into https://dict.leo.org and unavailable, D***, I really liked the site. I found another that seems good, https://www.cactus2000.de/uk/, check it out and let the rest of us know your opinion.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/watashi.nena

    Could you also say "Geht nicht durch die Tür" ? What is the difference between "gehe" and "geht"? I've seen both used as the imperative in this lesson.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    Yes, you can.

    The difference between "geh(e)" and "geht" is that the former is said to one person informally, and the latter is said to multiple people informally.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will709432

    I thought verb always had to be in 2nd place??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    Yes, in a main clause in the indicative mood.
    That means in a sentence that is simply a statement of (assumed) fact. When people talk about different types of sentences and clauses, a main clause that is in the indicative mood is what people call a 'normal' sentence. Here are some examples:

    • I did my homework yesterday
    • Gestern habe ich meine Hausaufgaben gemacht

    • I enjoy eating rice

    • Ich esse gerne Reis

    • I'll write to my father

    • Ich werde meinem Vater schreiben

    And in all those German sentences, the conjugated verb was the second element, as you correctly alluded to in your comment—however, here we are not dealing with the indicative mood, but with the imperative mood—used for making commands. Here we aren't just talking aimlessly, stating something that has either happened, is happening, or will happen; here we are speaking directly to someone and giving them an order.

    Amongst other characteristics, the imperative has the conjugated verb (which can differ from its indicative equivalent) as the first significant element, rather than the second.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archedmandible

    Could I use 'laufen'? "Lauf nicht durch die Tür." Is that wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    In a casual conversation, sure—because that's the way 99% of people are going to go through the door anyway—but "to go" bzw. "gehen" is the so-called 'umbrella term' or 'Oberbegriff' and "laufen" (which here I'd understand to mean "to walk") is an "Unterbegriff" or one of the terms that fall under the 'umbrella'; so it's more specific than the English sentence, which is why someone could mark the translation as wrong.

    To try and explain that in real terms, the phrase "Don't go through the door." would be understood to mean "This door is out of bounds. Find another way to get to your destination". Whereas, "Don't walk through the door." could be understood as "As long as you go through the door quickly you're fine". Because it's specifying how someone should or should not go through the door, rather than simply banning passage through the door as a whole.

    That's how someone could understand the difference between "gehen" and "laufen" in this sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThatOtherOneDude

    Wieso ist es nicht geht, sondern gehe?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    Wenn ich annehmen darf, dass deine Englischkenntnisse ausreichen, stehen deine Frage und deren Antwort schon in dieser Diskussion:

    watashi.nena
    Could you also say "Geht nicht durch die Tür" ? What is the difference between "gehe" and "geht"? I've seen both used as the imperative in this lesson.

    AdamKean
    Yes, you can.

    The difference between "geh(e)" and "geht" is that the former is said to one person informally, and the latter is said to multiple people informally.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguel741288

    Gehe durch die Tür nicht is marked wrong. I guess it's wrong then


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    I guess it's wrong then

    Indeed, and if you're looking for a bit of an explanation, I'd recommend taking a look at the top thread in this discussion (at time of writing and when sorted by Top Post, which—for me—is the default sorting method):

    rilianxi
    Why doesn't nicht go at the end?

    mizinamo
    I don't think nicht ever goes to the end.

    It's usually after the verb, unless there's a personal pronoun there.

    If there isn't much after the verb, then that might (coincidentally) be the end of the sentence.

    For example, Ich liebe dich nicht. "I don't love you". The nicht is right after the verb and the following personal pronoun dich. And coincidentally at the end of the sentence, but not because it wants to go to the end.

    ...
    AdamKean
    I think another point worth raising is the presence of a preposition (or lack thereof).

    Usually, when „nicht“ comes directly before a pro/noun it is singling out that element to be negated, and needs to be followed by „sondern“ and the replacement of said element to sound "complete". Zum Beispiel:

    „Zünde nicht die Tür an!“
    Sounds incomplete, and needs more info to be satisfied, z.B.:

    „Zünde nicht die Tür an, sondern das Auto!“
    (I won't provide the English translation for any non-German speaking pyromaniacs)

    Which means that in a lot of cases, it is best to place „nicht“ after the subject/object(s) for a more general negation; which often leads to „nicht“ going to the end (even though it wasn't "sent" there like an infinitive or past participle in a main clause, or conjugated verb in a subordinate clause) z.B.:

    „Zünde die Tür nicht an!“
    Which is fine on its own.

    However, when the noun is preceded by a preposition, this characteristic of „nicht“ to need a "rebuttal" is dulled to the point where the speaker would have to emphasise the noun with their tone to create this need of a rebuttal; z.B.:

    „Gehe nicht durch die Tür.“
    Fine.

    „Gehe nicht durch die Tür.“
    Please, go on.

    „Gehe nicht durch die Tür, sondern durchs Tor.“
    Ah, viel besser.


    I came to this realisation after wrestling between „Geh nicht durch die Tür.“ and „Geh durch die Tür nicht“. Although „Geh nicht durch die Tür.“ came to me first and sounded fine (at first), I started overthinking it and told myself that sentence would need a „sondern“, then got dinged for trying „Geh durch die Tür nicht“.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geraldfinzi

    Why gehe nicht and not geht nicht


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    "Geht nicht durch die Tür." should be an accepted answer, but if not, should be reported as a missing alternative (i.e. "My answer should be accepted").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geraldfinzi

    Thank you Adam, I shall report it!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucaGatto4

    I don't get why "nicht" goes in that position.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    Have you checked out the top thread in this discussion? The position of "nicht" in this sentence is discussed there.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bayu452793

    I've read that if you want to negate verb you place nicht at the end ex: ich mag es nicht. Nicht place at the end of verb if the definite article is der, die, das ex: Ente frisst die Hund nicht. And if you negate anything else you place nicht in front modified object ex: Das ist nicht mein zeug.

    So the question is why the answer is not gehe durch die Tür nicht? I want to negate the verbs and there is difinite article on it, why nicht not placed in the end?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

    I can only echo my words from the thread I linked above—the preposition ("durch" in this sentence) makes the difference:

    „Zünde die Tür nicht an.“
    Which is fine on its own.

    „Gehe nicht durch die Tür.“
    Fine.


    P.S. You gave the example:

    Ente frisst die Hund nicht.

    Which should probably either be:

    Die Ente frisst den Hund nicht. or
    Die Ente frisst die Hunde nicht.

    And "Zeug" should be written with a capital "Z".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HanneloreD380358

    Würde:"Geh nicht durch die Tür." auch akzeptiert werden ?

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