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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

Your most difficult word to say in another language

What is one of your most difficult words to say in the language you are learning.

April 18, 2017

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack.Elliot

.

Please and Sorry

to so many people

they seem to be

even unknown

in their own language

.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

Sprichst

That seems silly, but when I started working on really getting my pronunciation down, two of the things that required the most work were the ich-laut and the German r.

I can do the r pretty well now, but trying to pronounce it in "sprechen" after the "sp" (and it was worse in sprechen than in sprichst because the "e" after exacerbated the problem even more than the "i" did) made me sound like I was German Elmer Fudd.

Then in sprichst, doing a proper ch followed immediately by the st made me feel like a tongue-tied snake.

It was not a good combination.

For a couple of weeks, I'd be sitting on the train repeating "sprechen" and "sprichst du Deutsch" over and over again under my breath until my mouth mostly stopped rebelling and did what I told it to do.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

I feel your pain. I have had the same problem. Another fun one is Französisch. It has three different types of sibilants (s sounds). The /z/ in the middle is a nightmare. :)

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

I don't have a problem with that one, but if your native language is Finnish I can see how it would definitely be trouble.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cam_and_Alex

I know what you mean! The Dutch sounds of "g" and "ch" started out being a nightmare and sounded more like I was coughing up hairballs than speaking a language, haha =P I'm just glad it worked itself out with time.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Judge /ˈdʒʌdʒ/ - My native language (Finnish) does not have the /ʒ/ sound, let alone the /dʒ/ combination. Putting the combination twice in the same word cannot be legal. :P

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heschmat

so, you were not a fan of "Inspector Gadget", I guess?! :-D

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Ha ha! :D I can usually handle this sound combination once, so gadget is not a problem. It is when it appears twice that I am in trouble. :)

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heschmat

:-)) good, the sound 'j' is somewhat common in Farsi, though; the following words have two of it, for example:
jajrood ---جاجرود: it's the name of a river (rood = river, and jaj is kinda pronounced like 'judge' :-D)

jang'ju---- جنگجو(=warrior)
jur'va'jur-----جورواجور(= various, variety)
ja'be'ja'i -------- جابجایی (= relocation, movement)

:-D

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Could you help me find them on Forvo? I would love to hear them. :)

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heschmat

didn't know such a site existed, thanks for introducing :-)

Well, this would be the general link:
https://forvo.com/search/جار و جنجال/

For the others, just replace the one you want to hear:

جوجهchicken//جنگجوwarrior//لجوجarrogant//جاجرود-name of a river//جیرجیرک-Crickets// جستجو- search// جابجایی - relocation// جنجال - brawl// جورواجور - variety//

The main one, جار و جنجال, which has three, is synonym with 'جنجال' itself, but it's very common to use them together.

Fun fact, there is also جاجو, which is the Persianized version of 'judge', and young people use it to refer to someone who 'judges other people all the time' :-D It's not on Forvo, though. But it's the sound of 'judge' + 'u' in 'Uber'. :-D

Last word I remember, which I have to mention, is 'worldcup' = جام جهانی
https://forvo.com/search/جام جهانی/

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaGuaGua

geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung. -means "speed limit" good luck with that one

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heschmat

haha, a good one! Though I would say it's a totally normal world,

I mean, just break it down:
geschwind = fast, quick
=> Geschwindigkeit = speed (fastness,)

Grenze = border; limit
begrenzen = to limit, to restrict
=> Begrenzung = restriction

=> Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung = speed limit
[there is also: Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkung, which means the same.]

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaGuaGua

lol its my favorite word! Its from a movie clip from 'Bruno' - look up "Bruno peace in the middle east' its sooo funny and he uses that word (incorrectly), which makes it even funnier

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heschmat

haha, now I see where your 'bio' comes from :-))

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaGuaGua

yup :)

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

That is a long word...

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaGuaGua

lol its my favorite word! Its from a movie clip from 'Bruno' - look up "Bruno peace in the middle east' its sooo funny and he uses that word (incorrectly), which makes it even funnier

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jinagaa

Japanese 便利 benri. Japanese doesn't have a solid 'r' sound, and it sounds like a mix between an r and l which is just really hard for me to say.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

One way to fix that is listening to one or two Japanese songs and repeating what they say, when you get to the point where you pronounce those words the same as the native speakers you can aplly it to ordinary speech. That's how I did it any way, but don't go off and find some random Japanese song to sing, especially if you don't know the language well, they aren't all clean and apropriate. If your gonna try this try out the band perfume, all of what I've heard from them is clean, some of it weird and incoherent, but clean. Now this is just a fun way to get down those hard pronounciations, there are tons of other ways too. The best and infallible one is PRACTICE. :) hope this help you!

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jinagaa

I'm nearly fluent haha, but 便利 is still fairly difficult for me to say.

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

So this is something interesting I've noticed: I have a very hard time thinking an ich-laut.

I can pronounce it pretty well now, but in my internal monologue I always think it sounds more like "ik" or "ish" instead of "ich."

Anybody else have trouble with the way sounds that don't exist in your native lexicon sound in your head even when you can pronounce them correctly out loud?

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

It is exactly the opposite for me. I KNOW how the word judge is supposed to sound like. I know how to make the individual sounds. I know in which parts of the mouth things happen and how the tongue moves. And when I open my mouth... juts. :)

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupoMikti

For me, ich-laut is difficult not because of the sound, but because I somehow managed to condition myself to use ach-laut whenever I see a 'ch'. When I finally took a German class at school, my instructor was always pointing out that I pronounced all of them with a hard ch.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

I came at it from the other direction, which may be part of my problem. I basically turned ch into sh for, like, years. Once I finally buckled down and trained myself to pronounce it properly, I went through a period of a couple of weeks where I then had to back up and teach myself not to pronounce "sch" as "ch" because it was easier to just transition that sound in bulk rather than just in the words where it was appropriate.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KxngDeo.

'Naranja' which means 'orange' in Spanish gets me every time. It's hard to say it fast for me though.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S._Brown

"Portefeuille", which is wallet in French. I get my tongue tied every time!!! :-P

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasKafun

I cant remember: Veranstaltungen, Ermittlungen, Verwaltung,

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cam_and_Alex

"Vloeiend" is difficult for me. It means "fluent" in Dutch; ironic since the word gives me pause every time I see it or go to say it. =P

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheEeveeLord

地下室 (chikashitsu), meaning "Basement." I just find it a bit hard to pronounce.

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Espiraden

Vietnamese pronunciation for me, as it is a tonal language. that being said, đường (Sugar) is especially difficult for me.

April 18, 2017

[deactivated user]

    I personally find khuỷu to be a more difficult word for a non-Vietnamese to pronounce.

    April 19, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

    sköldpaddorna - Swedish for "the turtles".

    I can say it fine now, but it's got a lot of weird sounds in it. The first is the Swedish sj sound, which is sort of like saying /h/, /w/, /x/, and /j/ at the same time.

    Immediately following this is the Swedish ö. It's sort of like saying "er", but more sounded and without the final r.

    Then there's the two ds, which are both pronounced. This isn't a very alien thing to anyone who's learned pretty much any other language, but it's a bit weird for an anglophone. The same goes for the r, which is an alveolar flap.

    It's also weird in the grammar of the word: sköldpadda is "turtle", sköldpaddan is "the turtle", sköldpaddor is "turtles", and sköldpaddorna is "the turtles". The only non-Scandinavian language I've seen work anywhere similarly is Romanian.

    Also, if anyone who's currently learning English wants to have some fun, try saying "sixths" and/or "rural".

    April 19, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

    One of Mine is Ladegrat, it means charger in German and it is difficult to remember

    April 18, 2017

    [deactivated user]

      It's Ladegerät.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

      My I pad won't let me add that specific letter.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

      If you hold down the a button, it should pop up as an option. If not, you can use 'ae' 'oe' and 'ue' as replacements for ä ö and ü respectively.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

      Okay, thanks! :)

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akunosama

      Laden means to load and Gerät means device. Put them together and you get loading device. That is one of the beauties of the German language. :D

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heschmat

      how so? I find it easy, and completely logical:
      laden = to charge // das Gerät = device => Ladegerät = (battery) charger

      just like, for example, Spreibzeug = writing utensils (schreiben = to write, das Zeug = stuff, things), or Fahrzeug, Flugzeug, Spielzeug, or Faxgerät.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

      I mean hard to remember, by the time the comes around again in the 600 and something words I've alredy learned my mind draws a blank.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoFigure151

      KRANKENWAGEN

      Hehe Just Kidding. I Just Wanted To Say That Sorry XD.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupoMikti

      Literally any Dutch word with a 'ui' in it. So simple words like fruit and huis are impossible for me. For those that know IPA, that 'ui' sound is [œy̑]. It's basically rounded /ɛi/ but it's so difficult to do.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cam_and_Alex

      Think of it like you're saying "Ow" with a more rounded O and a shorter W. =)

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupoMikti

      Thanks for the advise! That's what I used to do, but those are back vowels while all the resources I've found show it as a front vowel diphthong (it also sounds more fronted in recordings; what's your view on it? Is it fronted or back?).

      The really crazy part is that I can make both of the vowels required separately, but it's really hard to say them together fast. I've been practicing by trying to say öü (using the vowels from German) because it's effectively close to the Dutch ui as I described in IPA. Sometimes I can get it in isolation, but saying it in a word is still tough.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cam_and_Alex

      To be honest, IPA and such is not something about which I've learned much just yet. I don't know the difference between front and back vowels. The Memrise coursework I've done and the Duolingo course both sound pretty close to how I pronounce the "ui" in words. It could just be a scenario kinda like in Spanish where you have a more rounded and open pronunciation for certain combinations. I can get those too without much trouble. It may just be an exercise in training your mouth to do it, just like how not everyone is born with the ability to easily roll their r's.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupoMikti

      Yeah, probably a situation like that. Front vs back is about tongue placement. A front vowel (like the 'ea' in beach [IPA: /i/] ) has the tongue toward the front of the mouth, while a back vowel (like the 'oo' in booth [IPA: /u/] ) has the tongue toward the back of the mouth. But it's not really that important to know IPA (unless you're a linguist), so don't sweat it.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dutchesse722

      It's "fronted". :)

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kamoshi

      I think in German the hardest word I have learnt so far is 'Jugendarbeitsschutzgesetz'

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

      That is a very long word too, what's it mean? I'm pretty sur I haven't learnt that yet.

      April 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

      "Youth work protection law"

      So I'm assuming it's "Child labor law" or something in that ballpark.

      April 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burnthomdi

      Huh...interesting, okay thanks! :)

      April 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grey236

      Kreeg/Krijg. I always pronounce the 'k' as either /x/ or /ɣ/.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickHofmann

      the german word for squirrel. Or the longest german word XD

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

      Well I'm not far enough along in Georgian to get it down to one word; I think its consonant clusters can be up to six phonemes long, so it's only going to keep getting worse.

      And the language has a bunch of ejective consonants (i.e. pronounced not with airflow from your lungs but by movement of the glottis), and of course these then appear in consonant clusters.

      So for now how about წყალი meaning "water." The first letter is like the English "ts" but ejective and the second letter is kind of like a k but pronounced with the tongue against the uvula instead of the back of the palate and ejective.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

      >the second letter is kind of like a k but pronounced with the tongue against the uvula

      Do you mean /q/ (like in Arabic)?

      April 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

      ყ seems to be consistently categorized as an uvular ejective /q'/, but I think it also has the most allophonic variation of any phoneme in Georgian, ranging from the ejective plosive to fricative, making it all the more difficult.

      April 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Language-Fox

      (Precursor: Holy ❤❤❤❤, so many people learning German?! Guys, I'm really proud of you - if I wasn't a native speaker I'm not sure I would have the patience to put up with our messed up grammar and compound words. Good job!)

      Swedish pronunciation in general is kind of difficult for me, mostly because I always stumble over the exceptions. What I've really struggled with is getting the rolling r sound consistent. Letter combinations like lj tend to trip me up as well.

      April 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

      What I've really struggled with is getting the rolling r sound consistent.

      It's really only trilled for emphasis. An alveolar flap (the non-trilled variant; sort of like an l plus the English t sound), bordering on the English r, is what's usually used.

      April 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Language-Fox

      I know what you mean. It usually only trips me up when there's several in a word or sentence. I have a horrible German accent in Swedish :,D (But then again, several th combinations in English trip me up as well and I consider myself fluent...) I'll have to practise it more, but the explanation made me realize what I might be doing wrong. I was leaning more towards what I'd do to imitate a Finnish accent or Italian (that comparison is probably bad). Thanks!

      April 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jthom777

      amarillo/yello the most fun

      October 24, 2017
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