"Can't you make a humane conversation?"

Translation:Δεν μπορείς να κάνεις μία ανθρώπινη συζήτηση;

April 21, 2017

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaithiWalsh

Well, the correct English equivalent is: ''Can't you have a humane conversation?'' I don't think I've ever seen, heard, or used the verb 'make' with 'conversation'.

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
Mod
  • 1018

True, but if I was asked to translate 'have' back into Greek, I'd use έχεις :-) κάνω doesn't always translate well and I'm not sure what English word could be used here to prompt the use of κάνεις without introducing something else into the sentence - perhaps one of the mods can help.

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995

Ok, I added "have" as a translation. But isn't that correct?

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
Mod
  • 1018

Actually, now that I think about it, I'd say yes it is. Although I think it's a very uncommon formulation and not one that sounds very familiar to me. What we would say in English quite frequently is 'to make small talk', which I guess is fundamentally no different to saying 'to make conversation'.

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaithiWalsh

Spdl79: Yes, and no. MY question or point was: What verbs are used, in English or Greek, with ''...a conversation''? Now, I'm speaking as an EFL/English teacher here, but anyway: in English - never mind Greek - we'd say, 'have a conversation' and not 'make...'. So the English translation here, as 'make a conversation,' is incorrect. To 'make small talk' and 'to have a conversation' are, roughly, quite similar. I say ''roughly'' because small talk is, by definition, about relatively banal topics, whereas having a conversation needn't be so. In contrast, I say you're wrong in claiming that 'to make conversation ... is fundamentally no different from [saying/using] `'small talk'''. Or at least: you'd have a humane conversation - whatever that means, I'm not entirely sure - but still, you'd typically use ''have'' and not ''make'' conversation, at least, when qualified with 'heavy' adjectives like 'humane'. You get a lingot from me, either way! Daithí

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
Mod
  • 1018

Many thanks for the lingot! I totally agree that you'd typically use 'have' instead of 'make', but Troll's right - if you Google 'make conversation', you will find that some people do use it.

April 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaithiWalsh

'to have a conversation' is (a) grammatically correct and (b) probably the most-used formulation. Certainly, as spdl79 points out, 'to make conversation' can be - and occasionally is - used. But I think you'll find that when there's an adjective used with 'conversation' - as is the case here, ''humane conversation'' - virtually always, it's with ''have'' and not ''make'': ''Can't you have a polite conversation?''; ''We had a very deep conversation'', etc. So: 1- 'have' is the usual verb for 'conversation', though 'make' occasionally is also used, and: 2- when there's an adjective used with 'conversation', typically we'd say 'have a...' and not 'make a...' Quite a few of the English translations given here for the Greek sentences are functionally correct, but that's not to say that those (English) translations are commonly-used, nor even that they make a lot of sense.

April 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bohuslav1

The difference in verb choice is surely connected with the use or non-use of the article, and therefore specific or general meaning.

You can have a [specific] conversation or you make conversation [in general].

But you can’t make a conversation or have conversation.

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil682961

Exactly this. "Make conversation" is fine; "*make a conversation" doesn't sound right.

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celesteaustral

Are there 2 different terms in Greek to express "humane" and "human"? Or does ανθρώπινος/η/ο express both ideas?

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanprendiville

Humane and human can indeed be used in a different sense but they can also mean the same thing, namely " Characterized by such behaviour or disposition towards other as befits a man" this would cover both words. That said I think this is an attempt to translate a Greek phrase into English and sometimes it just does not go:)

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I.Schmidt1

Δεν μπορείς να φτιάξεις μια ανθρώπινη συζήτηση;

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katerina182939

Make as if "to hold" "to maintain"

January 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katerina182939

Φτιάξεις isn't correct

January 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isidor868839

Is the article (μία) necessary?

September 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katerina182939

In this case we use it, but it would also make sense without it

January 26, 2019
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