"Dein Pferd hat Durst."

Translation:Your horse is thirsty.

March 1, 2013

19 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/divinedancer

why not "your horse has thirst"?

March 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertLunkez

because in English it's not have hungry or thirsty, it's used with verb to be "i'm hungry, i'm thirsty" .

March 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/pkrawc

"I have a thirst for blood" is acceptable english (although a little antiquated) but in this german sentence you are not saying "your horse has A thirst" just "your horse has thirst", therefore you need to modify the adverb to thirsty

March 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

Can anyone tell me how to pronounce "Pferd"? The recorded voice sounds like its saying "Fiat" !!

February 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KrzysztofS26

As long as Pferd is neuter (das), why it is written dein (maskuline), not deine (neuter)

January 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/arlenejellybean

Because "dein" is used for masculine and neuter; "deine" is for feminine.

February 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/khartouN

does "Dein Pferd ist Durst" make sense?

March 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/NosAstra

No, that would mean 'Your horse is thirst'.

April 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ShariniSen

"Dein Pferd ist durstig" is acceptable - if you intend to use 'ist'.

February 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartDavidBoyd

Why is it "hat" and not "haben"

Thanks!

July 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/purplatypus

Because it's singular

July 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Miszu

Ich habe, Du hast, er/sie/es hat <--- das Pferd is neuter so you treat it as an "es"

Wir haben, Ihr hat, sie/Sie Haben

July 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian

ihr habt

July 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/michaeltmalley

Your horse thirsts - correct

October 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Aurora-Keith

Your horse has thirst should be correct

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Lentzi

No, it shouldn't.

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mizzoth

That would be a literal translation of the individual words into English but that's not what it means.

Meaning often depends on a phrase rather than the words by themselves. Think about what the individual words mean in phrases like, "Who's going to take care of me?" It doesn't mean, "Who's travelling to acquire and remove worry of me." :)

August 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/HelloHello

Nobody would ever say that in English, sorry.

March 10, 2014
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