"Teveoporunrato."

Translation:I see you for a little while.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gormster

I keep forgetting "rato" is "bit" and "rata" is "rat"....

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cocacola321

Raton you mean. My trick to remember that is :

Por un RatO.. O === O.. Only for a bit.

ratoN .. N because rats are Nasty.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

No, actually "rata" is "rat." You're thinking of "mouse."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ComicOzzie

I almost typed, "I see you for a mouse."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DahviKoi

Could someone please explain why "I'll see you for a moment" is incorrect? "I see you for a moment" doesn't really make sense to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonmo
antonmo
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cos the Spanish is not in future tense

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MsLagerkvist

I just learned a something about ENGLISH grammar: awhile vs. a while.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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"I'll" is natural English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

It should have been "I`ll". No natural English speaker says "I see you for a moment".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djtea

For it to be "I will" veo needs to be veré. "I see you for a while" makes sense in certain context, but its use is very limited.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Yeah, like maybe you and I are setting up something and I'm trying to get you in the crosshairs of my rifle's scope from 500 yards away. We're using radios to communicate at the same time, butbyou keep moving. Then you ask me if I can see you and I say, "I see you..." :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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Give me an example of a context in which one would say "I see you for a while." Like the user above, I do not believe this is real English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CanaryGord

Thank you. My thought exactly

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/riotgorl

Could Te veo also translate as "I will see you"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/venetoblu

No. "I will see you" would be "te veré", as it refers to the future.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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I think you are wrong. Apart from the fact that we haven't yet encountered the future tense, I understand the near future can be conveyed in Spanish by the simple present tense and the natural English translation is I'll..... It is almost meaningless in either language without that implication of it is yet to happen and to put that meaning into English we use a future tense that is not explicitly required in Spanish. Is my understanding correct, anyone?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/venetoblu

Revised answer to "riotgort". Te veo mañana. Te veré mañana. (I'll see you tomorrow). After fiddling around in dictionaries etc, I think that both are acceptable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Thanks. I looked into it further and my assertion about "te veo" having future sense (in English "I'll......" is definitely correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sammygirly1

I did say "I see you for a rat" haha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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What is the precise meaning of this? I cannot work it out, because the English is not natural. Is it: "I will see you for a little while"? But even that is strange. "I will be seeing you (i.e. from time to time) for a little while" would make sense. Does anyone have an explanation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swanee11

I got dinged for leaving out a word not in the sentence. I wrote, " I'll see you for a while" and was told the answer was "I'll see you for a LITTLE while." Please tell me why I need LITTLE.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clikexedge

Why does "Te veo para un rato." Not work?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmeraldElement

Para is when the subject is 'for' the object, like "this is for you", like a transfer of ownership. Por would be the correct usage when you are describing the verb: "I SEE you FOR a while"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

"I see you by appointment" was wrong. Why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunomi_fr
brunomi_fr
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Appointment is cita, isn't it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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ratos libres = spare time or after some beer, you could say "free rats"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/griftrr

"See you for awhile" was incorrect. Do you need the "I"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Awhile" means "for a while." "For awhile" doesnt mean anything: the "for" is redundant.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidRose6
DavidRose6
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It sounds like grato

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smr36

" You used the wrong word. "I see you for a bit." doesn't make sense. IN A BIT IS MORE NATURAL

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonmo
antonmo
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if you change the “for” to a “in” you completely change the meaning

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
Maria696768
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Exactly but i wrote in a bit and was wrong..... duo taught that that before

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnishAdav

Someone please explain me the difference between 'te' and 'tú'.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
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It rejected "I am seeing you for a while". Reported 14 July 2018.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CanaryGord

That doesnt make sense

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krjain
krjain
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"I see you for a rat" is a good way to address a whistleblower

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miintono
Miintono
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Literally makes zero ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ sense but okay

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phillippavh

Why not "I see you for a while"

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewGBr1
MatthewGBr1
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I tried "I can see you for a while" and was rejected. Their English sentence is awful. The Spanish sentence might be perfectly natural, but they don't have a good English equivalent. I agree that it should be the "near future" and "I will see you ..." should be accepted.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewGBr1
MatthewGBr1
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This is SUCH awful English. It does not clue one at all as to what the Spanish speaker gets from the Spanish sentence. Is it a statement of fact of a current event? I doubt it. I would guess it means that the speaker cannot see the listener for longer. So in English it would be "I can see you for a little while." But that is only a guess. DL is not helping here.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transkter
transkter
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This is bad grammar. You would never say I see you for a little while. You would say I saw you for a little while or I will see you for a little while. Since I see is the present you can't talk about anything other than the present when using that form of the verb. This needs to be changed.

3 days ago
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