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  5. "Kommst du aus Deutschland?"

"Kommst du aus Deutschland?"

Translation:Are you from Germany?

April 25, 2017

110 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ljupcosst66

Why "Are you coming from Germany?" not correct ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quitschi4

It is correct, it's probably just not in the system.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eujean5

Also, it sounds very weird saying that in English. It's correct, but it sounds unnatural. "Do you come from Germany?" is a much more correct sentence from a grammatical stand point, and I assume that very sentence has a much different translation in German.


[deactivated user]

    If you're at the customs counter at an airport, it's not at all ungrammatical to hear the customs agent ask "are you coming from Germany?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John.Ha

    Yes I typed that too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmine_y

    Because, I believe, in this case the person is asking for the nationality. "Are you coming" instead indicates movement. You can actually use it in both cases, but this particular sentence, in this part of the course, focuses on introductions.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John.Ha

    I guess it depends on the situation. If you are asked at the airport of course.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashley292371

    I put the same thing and theh told me it wasnt correct


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dudesowin

    "Bist du aus Deutschland?" already means "Are you from Germany?".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    There are often different ways to say pretty much the same thing, compare for example English “Are you from Germany” and “Are you German”.

    In this case, there is a very slight difference: “Kommst du aus Deutschland” can either ask for somebody’s nationality or for the starting point of their journey (this second one is a bit less common unless you also add an adverb of time like gerade “at the moment”).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/astroflammante

    Where would you put the "gerade"? Kommst du gerade aus Deutschland? Or "Kommst du aus Deutschland gerade"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Kommst du gerade aus Deutschland? "Are you coming from Germany [at this moment]? Have you just come from Germany?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SushantAga1

    Is it right or wrong because i think the same thinh


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mehdi142591

    How do we say :where are you from??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raisinnoir

    Woher kommst du? Woher kommen Sie?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

    And "Woher kommt ihr?" for the plural "you"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjolnir8844

    Would "Do you come from Germany?" also be acceptable?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    Insofar as the German sentence can mean either “Is Germany your native country” or “are/were you just on the way from Germany to this place”, yes. I just can’t think of a situation where I would use the English sentence you suggested. But if you’re a native speaker and find it acceptable, then go ahead and report it. Otherwise I would ask for a native speaker to confirm it.

    Hope that helps.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raisinnoir

    "Do you come from Germany?" is perfectly correct English, as well as a literal translation of Kommst du aus Deutschland.. I would report it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paula_03680

    Accepted 1 july 18


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PersusjCP

    So questions in german reverse the first two words?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    Almost. We invert subject and verb, and the subject can consist of multiple words. So for example: “Der Mann kommt aus Deutschland.” (the man is from Germany) becomes: “Kommt der Mann aus Deutschland” because the subject is the whole phrase “der Mann”.

    Actually English used to do it the same way (and in a way still does, though often obscured by auxiliaries): “Comest thou from Germany?” So if it helps you, think of the word order being a little bit like Shakespeare speaking :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KishoreGop3

    So, just to clarify, the rule that the verb comes second in a sentence doesn't apply to questions?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    It does not apply to yes–no questions nor to commands; both of those sentences start with the verb.

    But WH questions (which have a question word such as "who, what, how, how many, why, ..." in them) do have the verb second.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenDoiHiuQuanh

    I have a question, is there so-called inversion (grammar point) in German like in English? Thank you


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    Basically yes, although I personally wouldn’t call it “inversion” in German. The pattern is:

    (question word) – conjugated verb – subject – (rest)

    So the pattern is the same as in English (with the exception that you never add anything like “do”). The reason I don’t particularly like the term “inversion” in German is because the subject can easily come after the verb even in declarative clauses:

    “Morgen fahre ich nach Berlin.” (Tomorrow I’ll go to Berlin. Literally: Tomorrow go I to Berlin.)

    This is because the conjugated verb always has to come in second position in declarative sentences. So if you pull something to the front (in this case heute “today”), the subject has to move behind the verb, so it can remain in second position.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vd3Uz2h4

    1 lingot for the literal translation @AbunPang


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrealphus

    So Germany and England are lands, that registers. Austria is a reich though, is that like kingdom? What is the difference between the suffixes?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    A Königreich (king-realm?) is a kingdom, a Kaiserreich (emperor-realm?) an empire. Perhaps "realm" might fit Reich by itself.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.LittleJeans

    In English, people sometimes form questions using the same word order as statements, but with a higher tone on the last syllable. So, I think "You come from Germany?" should also be correct.

    This is often the word order used when the speaker is surprised or doubtful, written sometimes with !? or ?!. "You come from Germany!?" Frequently, it is a rhetorical question.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    Yep, same in German:

    • Kommst du aus Deutschland?(Are you from Germany/are you coming from Germany?)
    • Du kommst aus Deutschland?! (You’re (coming) from Germany?! [I wouldn’t have guessed!])

    So seeing as there is a much closer German equivalent to “You come from Germany”, I don’t think it should be accepted. But I agree that it’s debatable. You could go ahead and report it next time it comes up and see what the moderators think.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jihad228014

    Ich komme Du kommst Er-es-sie kommt What about the others


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    kommen is completely regular in the present tense, so you can simply use the endings shown in the lesson notes of the first two units under "Conjugating regular verbs" -- https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Basics-1 is for the first unit and https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/The for the second one.

    Please read the lesson notes before you start a new unit -- you'll need to visit the Duolingo website to do so as they're not available in the mobile apps, and you may need to do so from a computer as the website often behaves like the app when viewed on a small screen such as a smartphone's.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMgva

    Are you coming from Germany, it's correct right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anish704020

    Can we use kommt here instead of kommst ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    No, you need the 2nd person singular form of the verb because the subject is du.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntishAnto

    Bist du aus duestchland? Is this correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    I would say yes as far as grammar and meaning are concerned. But I’m not sure if “duestchland” would still be close enough to “Deutschland” for Duolingo to recognise it as a typo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cindylee714845

    Are you coming from Germany? Do you come from Germany? Are you from Germany? Which is incorrect ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raisinnoir

    "Are you coming from Germany?" is incorrect because it could be asked of say an American..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    The German sentence is ambiguous in that regard. Depending on the context it can either ask for the other person’s nationality or the point from where they are just arriving. So “are you coming from Germany” and “are you from Germany” are both correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raisinnoir

    An American would never say "are you coming from Germany?" as an inquiry as to one's nationality. Rather it would be "are you from Germany?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    No but as an inquiry about the place from the other person is making a trip to wherever the speaker is. Granted that would not be my first interpretation when seeing the German sentence in isolation, but it’s a possible one.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdunnill

    Is anyone having it correct as France rather than Germany? It says Deutschland not Frankreich!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    I've removed the answer with "France"; it was probably added by mistake as there is a similar question with France in it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olagundoye

    You removed? Are you an admin??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    I'm a contributor to the "German for speakers of English" course.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anh975673

    I don't get it. When should I use komme, kommt and kommst?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    English verbs there is only one personal ending: the -s for when the subject is “he/she/it”. But in German each person has one:

    • 1st singular: ich komme (I come)
    • 2nd singular: du kommst (you (one person) come)
    • 3rd singular: er/sie/es kommt (he/she/it comes)
    • 1st plural: wir kommen (we come)
    • 2nd plural: ihr kommt (you (several people) come)
    • 3rd plural: sie kommen (they come)

    The form for 1st and 2nd person plural (wir and sie) is almost always the same (the only counterexample I can think of is sein (to be) which is more irregular than other verbs in most languages). The forms for 3rd singular (er/sie/es) und 2nd plural (ihr) also is the same in present tense for a lot of verbs but far from all of them (and in past tense the two are always different), so I suggest you think of them as separate.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielaMa825745

    The words are not correct


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaime103616

    I use are in this sentence and the program put as wrong. Please check it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    What was the whole sentence that you typed?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bethel131298

    Why is Germany called Deutshland?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    That originally meant something like "land of the people".

    See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_Germany#Names_from_Diutisc .

    "Dutch" comes from the same origin as "Deutsch" (Gulliver's Travels still refers to "Low Dutch" (in the Netherlands) versus "High Dutch" (in Germany)).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanBriden

    Why doesn't "You come from Germany?" Work here?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because that's not question word order in English -- it's statement word order just with a question mark at the end.

    Statement word order with question intonation is usually used to signal surprise and to request confirmation that you heard correctly.

    A neutral question, one asking for information, would be "Do you come from Germany?" with helping verb "do" first.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceecee582463

    Why isn't "sind/seid" used as "are" at the beginning of the sentence?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    The German literally asks, "Do you come from Germany?"

    But the more common way to ask this in English is probably "Are you from Germany?"

    This is a case where the translation is not literal (word by word), but rather translates an entire expression to the culturally equivalent expression in the other language without regard to whether any individual part matches.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    There is no separate progressive form in German; we just use normal present tense where English would use “am/is/are verb-ing”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PraveenDan9

    Are you come from Germany ? is right ..according to me, I don't know why its wrong ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben936193

    "Are you come from Germany?" is not correct because the spelling is wrong unless you're Starfire from Teen Titans Go.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poinkles

    I'm confused. would "Did you come from Germany?'' be an acceptable question or no because of past and future tense?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No, because of tenses (past versus present).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

    Nein. Ich komme aus PR.

    Was that good? I'd like corrections, please. Danke! :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Good in principle, but I think most Germans know "PR" only as "Public Relations" if they know the abbreviation at all, so it would be best to say "Puerto Rico" in full if that is what you meant.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NereidaValencia

    Is "You come from Germany?" correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No - that's not the basic way to ask such a question in standard English. It should be "Do you come from Germany?" with do-support.

    Using statement word order with a question intonation is special: it's used to request confirmation that you correctly heard something surprising, rather than asking for information in general.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NereidaValencia

    Oh, okay thanks for letting me know :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben936193

    Yeah, I told that to them but I don't know if they are tring to be Starfire if they are they are not doing a good job.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zombiegrin

    coz its Duolingo (not to be mean to the learing site)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam_sam14411

    How is it pronounced ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    What part exactly?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PRADEEP200914

    Why not,"do you from Germany?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    That sentence is missing a verb. “Do you come from Germany” should be accepted, though.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben936193

    If anything is missing in a sentence it is counted wrong like he forgot the verb.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VineetGaik

    Difference between kommen, kommt, and komme please?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 265

    It depends on the subject. It’s basically the same thing as the English rule that you have to add “-s” if the subject is a “he/she/it”, only in German there is an ending for every grammatical person:

    • ich komm-e
    • du komm-st
    • er/sie/es komm-t
    • wir komm-en
    • ihr komm-t
    • sie komm-en

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pswalsh

    Maybe its because my english is bad or its a regional thing, but I'd never say a question like that. I would say "You from germany?" Probably wrong, but w/ the are its seems tedious and people don't really speak that way.


    [deactivated user]

      People DO speak that way. It's the most prevalent way of asking where someone is from. "You from Germany?" could sound rude or harsh or just too informal.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heyjaydreamerr

      "You come from Germany?" is wrong? Whyy


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noelle358367

      Because "du kommst aus Deutschland" would be a statement. To form a question, certain words have to be switched. In this case, you'd have to switch the verb with its subject.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noelle358367

      So I thought of something: To change a statement to a question, simply switch the verb with the subject.

      Ex: Du kommst aus Deutschland.

      Kommst du aus Deutschland?

      Is this always true or am I wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      The general rule is that statements have the verb in the second position, while yes/no questions have the verb in the first position (usually followed by the subject).

      Your rule ("switching") only works if the subject is in the first position of the statement -- which is the default and most common word order, but not the only possibility.

      If something else comes first, such as an adverb or an expression of time or an object, then your rule doesn't work.

      For example: Heute lese ich ein Buch. "Today, I am reading a book." -- the question is not Heute ich lese ein Buch? but rather Lese ich heute ein Buch? "Am I reading a book today?".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victor163560

      What's the difference between "komme" and "kommst"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
      Mod
      • 265

      It depends on the subject. Remember how in English you have to add an ending -(e)s whenever the subject is a third person (“he/she/it”)? In German all grammatical persons have their corresponding endings. So for instance komme goes with ich and kommst goes with du. For more detailed information please refer to more complete tables (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_conjugation for example).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrigo451726

      Why not do you or, do you are from.?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Because that is not the way to form questions when the verb is “to be” in English (“are” is a form of the verb “to be”).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alireza174901

      Baesd on previous explanations, it is an informal type of question. Why do I say if i want the formal type?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Kommen Sie aus Deutschland?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alireza174901

      If I wamt use "Kommst Sie aus Deutschland" as a formal way of asking.... should I use kommen instead of kommst or not?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      If you use Sie as the subject, you have to use the verb for, kommen.

      kommst is only for du.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean.Ptr_Kang

      Are you coming from Germany Do you come from Germany should be correct.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ali298270

      I typed "are you comes from..?" too


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
      Mod
      • 265

      That’s incorrect English I’m afraid. Either “are you coming…” or “do you come…”


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FengShuiDebunker

      Come you from Germany?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
      Mod
      • 265

      That would have been correct in Shakespeare’s time, but in modern English you need to use “do” (at least if we ignore contexts where the speaker deliberately talks in a Shakespeare-like manner for purposes of humour).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PuppyWasTaken

      I guess it should be "Are you from German?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      No. "German" is the name of the language. The name of the country is "Germany".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samir1992

      Do you come from Germany?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben936193

      Am I from Germany? Cosidering my last name is pronounced in German surpriseingly no. If my last name is in German doesn't mean I am from Germany.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Littledrag199692

      I put do you come from germany and it said ehhhh ur right i guess


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cola_trave

      Is it correct to say "du aus deutschland" instead of "du kommst aus deutschland" ??


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Is it correct to say "du aus deutschland" instead of "du kommst aus deutschland" ??

      No, not at all.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissM128803

      "Do you come from Germany" should be accepted as it means the same thing.

      Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.