"Sitaki mwalimu mbovu"

Translation:I do not want a rotten teacher

4/25/2017, 8:41:44 PM

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vtopphol
  • 20
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Does mbovu in this context convey the same meaning as rotten in the English sentence?

4/25/2017, 8:41:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ngwarai
  • 20
  • 19
  • 19
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

I think in this context it should mean "bad" and not "rotten"

11/10/2017, 11:50:48 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/vtopphol
  • 20
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Yes, then I've understood it correctly. When you say "rotten" about a person, it would usually mean a really, really bad person. If you use the word for a profession, or someone holding a position, it would usually mean that the person is really bad at doing what he is doing.

11/10/2017, 2:46:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ShamimFana

In kiswahili the adjective mbovu is rarely used with a person. Although it can be correctly used to mean bad. The most common and more acceptable is mbaya.. Mwalimu mbaya - bad teacher. Mtoto mbaya - bad child

12/15/2017, 3:14:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/vtopphol
  • 20
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

I get the feeling that maybe evil is a better translation? At least the places I've encountered mbovu and waovu are in a more philosophical or religious context, and then evil would be better, as in not being bad at doing something but being in general a bad person.

12/16/2017, 10:44:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/gIUxu
  • 15
  • 12

i think bad should be accepted as well

2/7/2019, 5:13:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JediJian

This one is completely confusing and unclear. Rotten teacher sounds like zombie...

2/11/2019, 6:02:26 PM
Learn Swahili in just 5 minutes a day. For free.