"Tanzania we have rhinoceros"

Translation:Tanzania tuna vifaru

April 26, 2017

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/billhatcher

Shouldn't the english be, "In Tanzania, we have rhinoceroses."? And if so, would that make a possible translation, "Katika Tanzania, tuna vifaru."?

April 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RinnyJ

I definitely agree on the English translation. We might say Tanzania has rhinos, where I think Swahili allows the verb to identify the nation with the people. Tanzania has rhinos, but we are Tanzania, so "Tanzania have rhinos." It doesn't work in English, but that's what I think is happening.

June 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName

Tanzania tuna vifaru is fine. Tanzania, like all place names, can be used as a locative without any modification. It's very common to say nchini Tanzania ("in-the-country Tanzania"). I think katika Tanzania is probably OK, but not so common.

September 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaarina481764

Simply un grammatical English.

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Renata725212

I guess they try to bypass grammatical form " in Tanzania" which is still far a way before us. Katika Tanzania tuna vifaru.

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/billhatcher

Or perhaps, "Katika Tanzania, tunavyo vifaru"?

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Renata725212

Looks proper but for that I will answer you when I will get more avanced O.K ? :)

August 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName

To say "In Tanzania", you just say Tanzania or nchini Tanzania. Place names are inherently able to be used as locatives and to be clear about it, you can use the locative form of town, city, country, continent, etc. (kijijini, mjini, jijini, nchini, barani) before the place name.

Adding the suffix on the end of na is generally only used for pronominal situations (eg. tunavyo = we have them) or for special emphasis, so tuna would be much more common. If you do want to use the suffix on the end for the object, it wouldn't be -vyo though because rhinoceroses are animate; it'd be tunao.

September 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/aboutpurpo

How do I know when to use "tuna wa" rather than just "tuna?"

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName

Where have you seen tuna wa? It doesn't make any sense to me and the only example of it in the glosbe database is in the phrase tuna wa bluefin = bluefin tuna ...

So, I guess ... tuna when you mean "we have" and tuna wa when you mean "tuna of" ... ;-)

September 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName
  • Houston, we have lift-off
  • Tanzania, we have rhinoceros
December 24, 2017
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