https://www.duolingo.com/paulguk

lo uomo?

An Italian told me yesterday that it was "lo uomo", and gave my this rule to explain it.

lo uomo lo - sc- gn - aiueo -ps

I can't think that a native speaker would be trying to mislead me. Is this a regional variation? Like me, the speaker is quite old.

April 27, 2017

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DuoFaber

Technically, he was right, in the end l' is just short for lo and la, and uomo is masculine. Maybe that's what he was trying to say...? Or did he actually pronounce it "lo uomo"?

April 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/paulguk

The discussion was about which language was more difficult, English or Italian, and I gave l'uomo as an example of there being six definite articles in Italian. I think he was probably just explaining to me that l'uomo was a contraction of lo uomo, something that I hadn't realised before. It did seem a bit odd that il changed to l'.

April 27, 2017

[deactivated user]

    I just always accepted that before a vowel, it's always l'...

    I'm sure your Italian friend is right but in front of a vowel it doesn't matter if it's il, lo, la, le, etc... just always l' - it is easy to remember.

    April 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/CivisRomanus

    An exception to this rule is when the word begins with i or y followed by any vowel (this combination is found in very few words), for instance:

    lo ione  (not l'ione)  =  the ion

    lo yogurt  (not l'yogurt)  =  yogurt

    lo iato  (not l'iato)  =  the hiatus

    lo Yemen  (not l'Yemen)  =  Yemen

    lo Ionio  (not l'Ionio)  =  the Ionian Sea

    April 28, 2017

    [deactivated user]

      Yes, thank you for pointing that out. Of course, when it comes to languages, there seems to exceptions to every rule in every language. It's very tiresome!

      April 28, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/CivisRomanus

      You are welcome.

      April 28, 2017
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