https://www.duolingo.com/Slwesley09

Does anyone have experience learning German in a classroom setting?

The school I attend is offering a German course for a semester. (I'd take it next year or in two years). But I have no idea what it would be like. I heard that the German instructor is a native so i think that will be pretty cool. But i don't want it turn into a joke for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyv4ITFHdgI

Does anyone have any stories or experiences learning languages in a classroom (ex: high school or in university)?

April 30, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/idkhbtfm

I would definitely recommend taking it. For me, having someone being able to custom explain things that I don't understand helps a lot. You will also probably learn more frequently learned and colloquial sayings, not just 'The horse eats the holy potato.'

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Vrexo

That's like the next step after German lvl 15 :). Go for it.

And to explain better: I started with Duolingo and a class (probably not like the one that you are going to attend) offered me the possibility to actually start speaking the language. That works wonders.

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RobbNav30

Funny video indeed! Hahaahaha. Now, I do have experience learning english in a classroom. German I practice here in DL. English classes happened when I was in eleveth grade at school. It was amazing! Took me only to level up from basic to intermediate to start getting better at it and by the time I graduated was able to have a conversation. I'm glad the chinese teacher that guided the class for two years was very good. Good accent, grammar and all. By the remaining third year was a jamaican girl who gave us the classes. She was good as well. Finally, by the time I got my papers as graduated I was able to speak english as my official second language.

Time passed and I got interested in german, italian and french (not in that exact order) and a friend told me about this duolingo page. Currently, I keep the practice more in german rather than the other two that I decided to fully practice at a later time.

For all that is known, my advice is go for it! Making echo to a previous comment, you get to learn a lot more when going to a classroom. Hope you enjoy and learn as much as you can!

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ByzantiumStronk

As someone who is taking a German course in high school, it is very useful getting exposure to the language outside of duolingo. Of course, the big factor will be the work ethic of others. A bad work ethic will worsen the class and force the class to slow down. A good work ethic will make the class go faster and better.

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe650805

I studied German in High School from 7th thru 11th grades. Even passed the NYS Regents exam for German (somehow). The classes and instructors were good - but I didn't give the time and energy required to become truly fluent. Duolingo has helped me immensely to learn new vocabulary and have a better understanding of the proper endings for verbs and articles. That being said, I think classroom instruction if you have the opportunity, could be extremely helpful to truly understanding and speaking the language. If you really want to become fluent - I'd recommend classroom instruction. I intend to do so when the time permits.

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sylvia724882

I studied first year German in college and, also, studied first year Spanish. I worked very hard for "A" grades. I wish I would have had time to continue in both. Let's face it. Language study is extremely challenging in USA but really worth the effort. I am certain that my reading comprehension in English, my spoken English, my written communication in English, benefits from my foreign language study. In my opinion, if one wishes to be expressive, if one wishes to be successful, one must study languages, including linguistics, arts, mathematics, science. Hey, it's all good! Just read! Just study! Lifelong learning is so gratifying!

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MaxBabel

I recommend it. I took a year of German at university. Lots of fun and a great opportunity to meet people outside your discipline. A class will provide the kind of formal instruction that DL doesn't.

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mekeliki

I majored in Spanish and was a teacher for a short time after graduation. Most students in the Modern Languages department did a semester abroad at some point (usually junior year) and that's how they really picked up conversational skills. I went to the University of the Americas in Cholula Mexico for one full year as a Junior, and I came back fluent (and married, but that's another story! :-)). Other kids went to Spain or Argentina -- or wherever. I'm talking about Spanish -- but it was the same with all the languages. Students disappearing all the time and reappearing the next semester or the next year! :-)

Anyway, back to the point. Yes, do the class if you can. You'll get a solid understanding of how the language is put together which will help you when it comes to actually speaking. Keep in mind though that University classes do not aim to make you fluent. They teach you the language, but conversation is up to you. So, just go in knowing what it is. It's grammar, history, linguistics, some culture, and overall a good foundation. It's worthwhile.

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardEld5

I am a graduate of the Universidad de las Americas, but in 1969, when it was on KM 16 of the highway to Toluca. I got my MA in Spanish there in 1968, and later my PhD in Guadalajara, after which I taught 40 years. mostly beginning Spanish courses. I wish that Duolingo had been available when I was teaching. I retired in 2007. It was a clean and rather pleasant job, and althought it was not very well paid, I was never unemployed.

I realized that learning a language is even more useful at keeping my mind sharp than doing crosswords, and has far better benefits. The best way to learn a language is to jump into an environment in which you can speak with native speakers.

Duolingo is excellent for getting familiar with the vocabulary and pronunciation, and the program remembers what you got wrong and recycles the exercise again and again until you get to an intelligible response, allowing only typos and minor errors. I am using a used college German text Neue Horizonte to explain the grammar, which Duolingo does not, and I think I will soon start using vocab cards to impress the vocabulary even better. I can recognize hundreds of words, but recalling them in a flash still is difficult.

I am in a Duolingo club, the Half Blood German club. It seems that about a dozen of the members are inactive now, and a couple of others dropped out, leaving only me and a Lithuanian woman as the only two currently active members. So there are two places open, ans I invite anyone interested to join the code is SDFB82.

I think I can honestly say that the main difference between Duolingo and a college class is that Duolingo requires self-motivation, since you cannot flunk out. The college class will give you academic credit, but a couple of semesters is only 84 semester hours, plus perhaps 30 hours in a language lab. Used college books are super cheap at Abe Books. Do not worry about an earlier edition: languages do not change very fast,ans 2002 German won't be any different than 2017 German. What will differ are computerized lab programs and workbooks.

I also have studies French and just two weeks in France was extremely helpful in awakening my fluency. I was in Paris and in a tiny village 20 kms. N. of Pau. (Aquitane, I think). No one knew any English, but a couple of locals spoke Catalan and Spanish.

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mekeliki

Wow! Rare to meet people who know about UDLA! Great to meet you! My wife was a law student at BUAP, but her aunt was a professor at UDLA and so she was around campus frequently. I needed someone to hang out with and speak Spanish with me, so I hired her to do that. Obviously it turned into more! I wound up moving in with her in El centro de Puebla -- 2 Poniente! Circa el Zocalo, and that's how I had the best year of my life! :-)

I agree with you about Duolingo. I wish it had existed when I was in school. I've learned more German here than I did Spanish in my first year or two at Oklahoma!

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/theoisbae

I am in High school and I am currently taking German. It is awesome and at least for my school the teachers are fun and fluent but also American. They have both lived in Germany for several years and they are very understanding and help students individually if needed. If you need them to slow down we can lat them know and they will. But I am sure it is going to be different depending on the school.

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mohe890

I have been learning German for 2 years now, whether it was in a classroom or self-taught and till this moment I am still studying it in a classroom (B2 second chapter), and still I find people who stutter or can barely speak. so my advice for you would be to just keep trying to talk and express your thoughts and don't worry too much about being to 100%correct, everyone will notice your effort and will try to help you, and fluency will just come as a bonus then :)

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/HansWT

I start an intensive German class tomorrow in Bonn - 5 days a week, 4 hours a day. It will be interesting to see how Duolingo (and other resources) for about 6-8 hours a day for 2 months helps or hurts the classroom experience - or if I get bored in the classroom as it starts at the very beginning.

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Slwesley09

thanks everyone for the replies. I appreciate it.

I think I'll work towards finishing the tree, reading books, listening to a lot of audio (radio, youtube videos, etc.) and maybe having an italki lesson. I'll probably continue with duolingo along with other resources. My School is offering a chance to host a German Exchange Student for two weeks. That might be something to look into.

There's a few more possibilities: My aunt is german, a native speaker, and my family and i might plan to see her at the end of the summer. If not I might just take a trip into New York city for a few days. I rode the train into New York city last august and I heard a woman speaking German on the phone in front of me. It was interesting but unfortunately my german was very weak at the time and I did not have the confidence to speak with her. But maybe after I've really immersed myself into the language and spent time with it. My confidence will boost

Maybe in a year I'll take the course. Mostly for speaking practice. And also the interaction with a native (They know the language they grew up with it). Also so they can explain things that I don't understand. Also just to get outside the realm of simple sentences like "There is a red bag". Or "The horse eats an apple"

May 5, 2017
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