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https://www.duolingo.com/Pigeonesque

How to immerse yourself in a language not widely spoken nearby

I've heard that moving somewhere a given language is spoken is one of the best ways to pick up that language, but dropping everything to go live elsewhere for a while is a lot easier said than done.

I'm guessing Youtube is a good place to start, and I'm wondering what other places and methods people here have found of immersing themselves in a language from a distance, so to speak. Especially those who've managed it with languages that are relatively rare outside of their homelands, like Welsh, Finnish or Inuktitut.

Whether or not you have ideas, thank you for reading this.

1 year ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Zerr_
Zerr_
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Amikumu is currently only for Esperanto, but plenty of other languages will be added soon. It lets you know which people who speak the language are nearby.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RCCoughlin

If you live in america, a good language to learn is Spanish, or Chinese!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigeonesque

I'm in Canada, but I'll keep that in mind should I ever move South. D'you find local speakers quick to switch to English with obviously still-learning speakers, or are they generally patient with newbies/forgiving of errors?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aroboticist

That depends on the person. Sometimes, if I mis-speak, my native Spanish speaking friends who are confident in their English skills will switch to English to make it easier for me. However, those who are still learning English are obviously much more comfortable in Spanish and ignore any small errors I make, and are patient with me if I struggle to remember a word or form a sentence quickly.

1 year ago