https://www.duolingo.com/Grace856846

4 languages at a time? Is it difficult?

For me, 2 languages is fine. But i'm not sure if my brain could do 3 to 4 . I know some of you are doing a ton. How do you do it? Don't you try to concentrate on getting the meaning of a word in a certain language, and much less with 5 or 6 different defenicions of the same word?!

May 9, 2017

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ally.x
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The more languages you learn the slower the progress will be (at least for most people), people who really care to learn the language tend to learn only one or two languages while others like to learn for the sake and fun of learning and do 4 or more languages at once. If they actually stick with it it can still work, just it will take longer (naturally if you put 1 hour a day into one language or 1 hour a day into 4 languages (15 minutes per language) the result will be different).

Generally I would recommend not starting two languages at the same time... once you get the basics (say one quarter or one half of a tree here on Duo) you could try to add another one. This will make your life much easier.

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jacquelynadelezz

I personally would stick with two. Learning too many languages at once would make things difficult. Not only would your progress be slower but you would most likely start getting confused or overwhelmed. Stick with the languages your learning now and move on to the other one or two once you're satisfied with what you've learned. I like to spend all of my time and attention on just one to truly know the language. (Hopefully I'll be bilingual soon lol.) My motto is slow and steady wins the race. I have my own pace and learning methods but that's only me. Practically speaking, it doesn't make sense to be learning more than one but I don't know, you do that if you feel you can. But I know the feel, there's so many languages to learn and not enough time and brain capacity to do so!

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mobetty
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Hi, Grace. I´ve been using duo to refresh Spanish, French, German, Italian. These are foreign languages whose grammar-vocab I had learned before.

Each day I rotate my top XP priority language. I attempt points in each of these 4 languages. I switch to brand new languages such as Danish or Catalán when my brain can't retrieve words accurately because of code-switching interference.

I am also ¨learning¨ English from both Japanese and Korean. If you cannot type well in the base language which is my situation, then progress is slow but steady. However, squinting at non-Latin characters is a great mental break from exercises in familiar languages.

Alles Gute y qué te vaya bien.
Just keep swimming!

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/echo58105
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At first it was difficult with Spanish and Italian, I kept mixing the two but that aspect has already improved a lot. So I suppose it depends on the languages you are thinking of doing.

Otherwise I'd say that it isn't a problem, you just have to be regular and not be afraid to take a break off a language if you feel overwhelmed.

The way I see it, having several languages in the pan gives you the opportunity to take a break when you're tired of working on one in particular.

That being said, you could simply give it a try?

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Merrowmic
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It's totally normal to me. It's an ordinary, daily routine, working on my languages. And since I study two of them at a university, it makes it even easier.

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/autumn330
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It helps if you keep a balanced schedule for studying them, and prioritizing some over others. It may seem difficult at first buy once you get the hang out it it seems more normal haha

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/--Narcisz--
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I think that you shouldn't add too many languages at once. Once you know well the basics in a language after you can add some other language.

May 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/InuzukaShino
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From my experience and from what I am thinking, your success in every practiced language will be smaller, if you learn many languages at the same time. But it depends, how quick you can master the grammar concepts of the languages, how fast you can memorize the vocabs and if you can isolate what you learn, so that you will not be mixed up by so many different vocabs, grammar concepts and so on.

First I wanted to learn or practice three or four languages at a time: Spanish and Japanese (reverse tree) as a refreshing course, English just for fun and Turkish and Polish as new languages.

But Polish was...IS so difficult, that I decided to only learn one new language at a time, because I wanted to go ahead more quickly and with more success. I finished my Polish tree some months ago, I kept the tree gold all the time and it is stable since many months, it needs only some practices now to keep the tree gold all the time, so that I am thinking about to start a second language soon. But I am still working on the Polish reverse tree (PL-EN), so that I wait, till I finished this tree and kept this tree stable also.

As I am seriously want to learn Polish, I will start a new language tree, if I have enough mental ressources for that, also because I have some more hobbies aside from learning languages ;-)

May 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace856846

Thanks guys! Really helped. I think like some of you said, i'll go with these two a bit longer,( maybe 1 or 2 months or so) and then head for another. By the way, other than spanish/english, what do you'll think the most beneficial language out of all of these is?

May 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mobetty
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Lieber Grace, Das klingt gut! Get a firm grasp of the vocabulary and pronunciation of German and Spanish before learning a new grammar.

If there isn´t a language that fascinates you because of your heritage or future travel plans, then perhaps you might consider learning either Russian or Japanese this summer... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_used_on_the_Internet

In terms of the number of speakers worldwide, Mandarin and Arabic would be beneficial.

May 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/El_Gusano
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I suggest you do what makes you happy. Languages here are free so you can feel free to "try out" any other languages to see if you'd like to take on others.

May 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace856846

Thanks guys, really helpful. Might try some of those out soon.

May 11, 2017
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