"Someone will go with you."

Translation:Jemand wird mit dir gehen.

May 11, 2017

15 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EYEBALLORIGAMI

Irgendwer not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MortiBiRD

Irgendwer is more like anyone. It changes the meaning slightly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

In this sentence, IMO, irgendwer works as a synonym for jemand. At least in my regional (Northern) variant of German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MortiBiRD

Thats strange, I thought the norther you go, the more people care to speak proper high german. Irgendwer (and irgendjemand) have a stronger conotation of uncertainty. Jemand is an unspecific person, irgendwer is a "really" unspecific person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannibal-Barkas

to me, irgendwer has a conotation of indifference like "I don't care who" while jemand tastes like "someone from around here". Irgendwer and irgendjemand seem more similar to me. (from South Germany)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shinarit

"mit euch" is not good, only "mit dir", why? English you makes no distinction and the context gives nothing to decide.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Just a forgotten alternative; added now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim85599

Would "Jemand werden" not also work since Someone doesn't specify a particular gender? Or is jemand always singular?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

is jemand always singular?

That's right.

Just like "someone" in English. You can't say "Someone are waiting for you", for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim85599

I see the problem now. I was thinking of "someone will go with you" as "they will go with you" in English since "they" can be singular or plural. But "they" would refer to a specific person if singular. Danke!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandro.Steve

,,Jemand wird mit Sie gehen''

Why is the usage of "Sie" here wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

mit requires the dative case.

Sie can be nominative or accusative, but not dative -- that would be Ihnen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandro.Steve

That is super useful.

Dative Sie = Ihnen.

I'll be sure to remember that in the future. Thanks Miziamo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fan_von_Wien

Why does the verb "gehen" go to the end instead of in the second position?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why does the verb "gehen" go to the end instead of in the second position?

The inflected verb (the one that changes form depending on the subject) goes in the second position. That's wird in this sentence.

gehen is in the infinitive (the dictionary form) here, and infinitives go to the end.

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