1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Aveva saputo troppo."

"Aveva saputo troppo."

Translation:He had found out too much.

March 18, 2014

85 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GdenisM

used in every gangster movie made in Italy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stolijoed

American gangsters are not so grammatically inclined as to use the past perfect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin135869

I gangster americani sono davvero una squadra maleducata! I gangster italiani invece sono signori più raffinati, intelletuali e romantichi XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minou411265

mi fai sorridere! m


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adelriosantiago

bwahahaa, you have a lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jml646982

What a nice streak you have !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plat_

You both have great streaks! Keep them up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanni666

I got it right with "She had known too much" just in case anyone is interested.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

I have just got it wrong with "He had known too much"... It's really frustrating how many bugs the Italian course has!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robnich

I also was marked wrong for "He had known too much" on June 28th 2017. It is correct, further proof that there is no justice in this world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

"Sapere" generally means to have knowledge (~ to know) but in passato prossimo the meaning changes towards had gained knowledge had learned / had heard / had found out.
Find out more at ThoughCo

Aveva saputo = (he/she/it) had found out/heard/learned
troppo = too much

He/she had found out too much.

Trapassato prossimo di Sapere (had found out):
avevo saputo
avevi saputo
aveva saputo
avevamo saputo
avevate saputo
avevano saputo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

Thanks but then again, how would you translate "He had known too much"? I imagine the translation would be the same so it should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anita734232

UK gangster fiction would say 'She knew too much' so not the right tense for this bit of Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack386237

But duolingo marked learned as incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomStender

That answer worked for me, Nov. 17, 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesBordo1

Absolute proof indeed!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

Yes, it is okay on 09. 06. 2028.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chickenbel

Accepted now April 10 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AleksandarPuskas

Doesn't work for me. April 20, 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RanRavitz

It didn't work for me. April 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill80776

Still wrong, March 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaIramendy

I wrote exactly the same and I was marked wrong. Is DL capricious?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natitalian

Interesting... that is exactly what I wrote... and I was marked wrong !!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catia9
  • 1478

I just got it wrong too... maybe this is an idiom DL just wants us to accept


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kieran459226

None of my dictionaries give 'to find out' as a translation of 'sapere'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

According to these articles the meaning of sapere changes in the passato prossimo to "found out" but this does not apply in the other tenses.

https://www.thoughtco.com/italian-verbs-sapere-conoscere-2011690

http://icebergproject.co/italian/2015/10/when-to-use-the-imperfect-tense-and-when-to-use-the-past-tense-in-italian/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/An_dz

And what's your point? Translation is not an exact science, if it was you could use Google Translator all the time and it would be 100% correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kieran459226

My point is that 'he had known too much' was not 100% wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Macossay

Collin's Italian Dictionary online does give one example where sapere is translated as "to find out." But it give a lot of examples where it is translated as "to know."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/An_dz

Ahhh.... Well, I believe it's accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sasaneczenka

still not, March 2017...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomVanassche

no, it's not. Feb 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean454683

still not, April 2017...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natitalian

Still not, July 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

the first suggestion was "to learn", so I wrote "He had learned too much". Why was this not accepted? I have reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeresaGrocki

I got the same!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libellule808

Learn is imparare, soo that would be the reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

Even DL is under the stranglehold of the mafia!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pancho_Delanave

I always get this sentence wrong because I automatically think of the movie "The Man Who Knew Too Much" and put "he knew too much" as the answer.

Breaking habits is hard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hagemeijerhans

what is wrong with "he knew too much"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susanna35

The unit is on past perfect, therefore "he had known".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beneytodd

I put 'he had known too much' but it was marked wrong. Seems odd, when 'she had known too much ' was marked correct for Giovanni666


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slowhand52

“Had found out too much” means “aveva scoperto troppo (o troppe cose)”, in my opinion (I am Italian native) the correct translation is “ had known too much”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fernandoarg

I think the translation is wrong because the verb ''sapere'' (to know) is not the same that ''scoprire'' (to find out).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeniaAT

Well, I translated "She had known too much" and it was marked correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobMallord

I guess 'she had known' implies that she had found out...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fernandoarg

Duo corrected it, I think. I wrote the same three days ago and it was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeniaAT

Yup, they probably did.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

I've actually seen both 'sapere' and 'scoprire' used to mean 'to find out'. Are any native speakers able to weigh in on what the nuances of usage are here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveVelo1

"troppo" means "too" or "to much" so "he had known too" should have been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deesole

troppo can mean too as in "too hot" "too cold" but for all uses of too. For actions such as know, read, would require a different word. (like anche)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IlanaBaum

How cow aveva saputo become to had heard, not had known?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IronDesign221b

When I typed in "she had known too much" it was wrong and corrected to "she had heard too much". And here it translates to "found out too much". I'm confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kRQDkJjO

As an Italian native speaker this sentence sounds wrong to me, we could easily say "sapeva troppo" but never heard anyone use that tense in this kind of sentence, it just sounds weird


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razang

"had found out" is not equivalent to "had known" in English. The first defines an action, while the second implies an existing knowledge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

But "Aveva saputo troppo." is Italian, - not in English.

Find out more at ThoughCo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cave_felem

Duolingo is teaching us mafia Italian again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David298276

Better yet, he knows too much-boom!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norill1

Luigi, bringe the concrete and some bootes!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieSchwe3

I put "he had known too much" and it was marked wrong /May 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeresaGrocki

My written answer matched exactly the correct answer, but it marked me incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonNicol2

He had known too much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandmangpd

"He had known too much" is still wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sionel
  • 1097

21/09/19 - “He has known too much” is rejected.

Which part of this phrase refers to anyone finding anything out?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceramistamarko

scoprire... to discover, ie find out. Not Sapere, to know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendaFree3

"He had known too much" should also be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XvmR7AHZ

HAD KNOWN not accepted Dec, 22 2020.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

Sapere is about having or gaining knowledge and in passato prossimo the meaning shifts towards gaining knowledge, - as in had found out.

Find out more at ThoughCo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack386237

Before aveva saputo meant learned, here that was wrong, and it became found out. I get that it's not known in the past but don't get the change in meaning from learned to found out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catherine302968

Why can't we say he had known too much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hana.Banana

Hahah such a funny pronunciation :) the word troppo should be pronounced with two p.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tinywriting

So he had to be rubbed out --> Così doveva essere strofinato fuori


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stronzia

doveva essere strofinato? was he the genie of the lamp? :P

just kidding... maybe you wanted to say "doveva essere fatto fuori" (eliminated)
"strofinare" is just the literal translation of rub: you can strofinare a rubber on the paper, or a sponge on a plate etc. but "strofinare fuori" doesn't have any sense for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tinywriting

Thanks for your informative remarks but, in my own defense, 'rubbed out' doesn't really make much sense in English either!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roadlawyer

Obviously you aren't a fan of film noir from the 40s;-) "Rubbed out" was a very common phrase in those movies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEONARDOArtist

I'm tellin you, I don't like a smart guy. One more wisecrack and you're next to be rubbed out fella.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEONARDOArtist

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary To rub out: to remove or separate by friction; to erase; to obliterate; as, to rub out a mark or letter; to rub out a stain


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randonneur3

There are many walking dictionaries commenting here about.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sp4mblob

if you delete some writing from a paper, you can "erase" it. people are "eliminated" (spy movies, mafia etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angeluzfun

This is the italian Pablo Francesco

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.