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https://www.duolingo.com/MarkovV09

vente, til det næste tog?!

MarkovV09
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Hvis han ikke er med toget klokken 11.58, så kan du da vente, til det næste tog kommer ti minutter senere.

What does "...så kan du da vente, til det næste tog kommer ti minutter senere." mean in English? It is an excerpt from "Colloquial Danish".

1 year ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RaiNey037
RaiNey037
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''then you can wait, till the next train arrives ten minutes later''

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmareloTiago
AmareloTiago
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So then you can wait, until that next train comes ten minutes later.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkovV09
MarkovV09
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Wouldn't that be "...til det næste tog der kommer ti minutter senere."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poulpoul

I'm not entirely sure about the grammer, but these two sentences sounds best to me as a Danish speaker.

  1. Så kan du (da) vente, til det næste tog kommer ti minutter senere - then you can wait until the next train arrives 10 minutes later. (the next train is the subject of the subordinate clause)

  2. Så kan du (da) vente PÅ det næste tog, der kommer ti minutter senere - then you can wait FOR the next train which arrives ten minutes later ('der' is the subject of the subordinate clause)

'Du kan vente til det næste tog, der kommer...' sounds wrong because you cannot wait until 'something', but only wait until someTIME/something happening at a specific time.

'I am waiting until the train' does not make sense grammatically.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmareloTiago
AmareloTiago
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I don't know how necessary the word der is in that sentence.

It would not affect the English translation of the sentence, whether "there" or "which" was included or not. If anything, the omission of those words in English make the sentence smoother and less clunky. I don't know if that is a parallel to the Danish or not but the two languages have been similar in similar pairings in the past.

Perhaps that question is better asked of a Dane.

1 year ago