"The waiter reads easily."

Translation:Ο σερβιτόρος διαβάζει εύκολα.

May 17, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StellaNtal
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  • 1045

Ευκόλως is very very formal,not commonly used,it means the same but you won't hear it in everyday speech, with the exception perhaps of the phrase τα ευκόλως εννοούμενα παραλείπονται (things easily understood are omitted)

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1049

Thank you very much for helping to clear that up Stella, it's really appreciated.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StellaNtal
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  • 1045

I am glad i have helped!

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1049

"ο σερβιτόρος διαβάζει ευκολώς" was marked as incorrect (I know I got the tonos wrong, but ευκόλως doesn't seem to be accepted at all). General strengthening on web.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
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  • 43

Most adverbs end in α in Greek. You will like this I think. here

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1049

Many thanks for the link Jaye, I hadn't come across that site before. I tend to think of adverbs as usually taking a form that looks like the neuter plural. I could be mistaken, but I think ευκόλως is actually an adverbial form of εύκολος though. I'm not sure if it's a very obscure construction of it or not, but it's how I first learned 'easily'. I have actually seen that a bit, ie, making adverbs by replacing the omicron in the adjective with an omega, and shifting the tonos. συγχρόνως is another good example.

I'd be interested to hear from some of our resident native speakers whether this is 'good' Greek or not, ie, whether it's preferable to always go for the -α ending instead.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

Yes, ευκόλως is indeed an adverbial form of εύκολος, however, εύκολα is the adverb that is most commonly used, both in texts and speech. Also, ευκόλως is used in very particular cases (mostly with a participle, like you'll see in the example), just as some fixed phrases. Like, "Τα ευκόλως εννοούμενα παραλείπονται", which is a pretty common phrase, meaning that things that are easily understood (or in other words, τα αυτόνοητα), don't actually need to be said. :P

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1049

Thanks so much Dimitra. I think because I was self-teaching before I actually started lessons, I've picked up all sorts of weird words that don't quite work and are often too formal (eg my teacher was recently quite amused by me using εντούτοις instead of οστώσο). I guess in that case it's probably best not to add it as an alt to this sentence and I'll try and get εύκολα into my head instead.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995

The others have answered to your initial question, so I want to add something if you don't mind. Some adverbs have only -ως forms (συγχρόνως, συνεπώς etc) and most of the others have both -ως and -α forms. In that second category there are some adverbs that it's completely fine to use any form (βέβαια-βεβαίως, τελικά-τελικώς, επιπρόσθετα-επιπροσθέτως=moreover etc) but the others are commonly used with the -α ending. But, it is somewhat ok to use the less commonly used -ως ending when preceding an adjective or a participle if that would not cause some misunderstanding (for example the -ως ending adverb being interpreted as a masculine adjective, for example καλώς-καλός). For example it is weird to say Ο άντρας μιλάει ασχήμως (because no adjective follows) it's a bit less weird to say Ο άντρας είναι ασχήμως ντυμένος or Τα παιδιά είναι ασχήμως ντυμένα. But, that still sounds formal and old-fashioned and funny if used in a less-than-too-formal situation (as if mocking the high society and language or something, or acting like one of the kind), but it's not so out of tune to a native's ears. I analysed that for knowledge's sake, but I advise you to use the -α endings, and avoid the others, unless you want to sound snobbish or judgmental for fun (with a fitting facial expression, of course). If you want to, feel free to use them even without an adjective or participle following. ;) Keep in mind that in some cases, there are semi-fixed expressions that use the -ως ending adverb, as the aforementioned τα ευκόλως εννοούμενα or the καλώς!=fine!.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1049

Of course I don't mind Troll, and thank you very much for taking the time to provide a bit more information. As I've said before, I initially came to Greek via Memrise, so for the first nine months or so, I was really just learning words shorn of context. Even now, I'd say my vocab is miles ahead of my ability to use it properly (and I'm yet to find uses for αβλεψία, κλεψύδρα, χρυσό φυλλομετρήσεως, βραχίονας του πικάπ, etc etc). So any tips at all on usage, patterns, background, etymology and so on are always more than welcome. And I'll now use -α endings wherever possible ;-)

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
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  • 43

Yes, I've sent this link to some others who are online now to give a better explanation than I'm capable of.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1049

Thanks Jaye!

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
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  • 43

Oh, I'm so glad it got sorted out. And we do have a grand team to the rescue so speedily. I knew that I had only heard of "ευκόλως in the expression "Τα ευκόλως εννοούμενα παραλείπονται." but was afraid I'd have missed something, but when I checked the net that's the only place it was shown.

There are a great many such expressions as you can well imagine for a language with such a long history. If I find a good site I'll post it.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryScott413679

What does this sentence mean? It makes as little sense as its translation in greek. I mean the syntax is correct but I don't think there exists a context it could be used in.

January 13, 2019
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