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  5. "There is a stone in my shoe."

"There is a stone in my shoe."

Translation:Da ist ein Stein in meinem Schuh.

March 3, 2013

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaterGut

could one not use 'es gibt' here rather than 'da ist'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

»Es gibt ein Stein in meinem Schuh.« would mean “There's a stone available in my shoe”. But you could say »Es ist ein Stein in meinem Schuh.«.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont
  • 111

I love this interpretation: "Oh no, I really need need a stone but I can't find one!" "Don't worry man, I always keep one in my shoe, just in case."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Oh, wait, the English “There is a stone in my shoe.” could also mean “There's a stone available in my shoe.”. So the answer is yes, one could translate it as »Es gibt ein Stein in meinem Schuh.«. It may be somewhat less plausible in general, but in pont's comedy routine…


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob20020

Will "es gibt" always mean "available?" Then we should almost never say es gibt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

‘Es gibt’ can also mean “There exists”. See ArmasUkko's comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaterGut

Thanks, Andreas!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Feras..

Albert EinStein :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abjad8

Es gibt einen Stein in meinem Schuh also accepted for me. Stein is in accusative and Schuh is in the dative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArmasUkkoM

hm, no, because "da ist" gives more a local information. "Es gibt" expresses the existence of something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordPemrose

Es gibt should be accepted and not counted wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jess1camar1e

"es gibt" is an accepted by Duo now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c4gray

Kieselstein geht auch oder nicht?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Das wäre spezifischer als “stone”, und hieße eher “pebble” oder “piece of gravel”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JediMasterArtoo

Oder ein groß stein!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

»groß stein« → »großer Stein«


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JediMasterArtoo

Was ist ein "Kieselstein?" ich denke das es geht nicht...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's a pebble, like AndreasWitnstein said. A small stone, usually worn smooth and round from lying on a riverbed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/royalt213

I officially have no clue how to use "da."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berchtesgaden

Why would they ever use "in meinen Schuch"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

[‘Schuh’, not ‘Schuch’.]

The accusative form ‘meinen’ cannot be used with the verb ‘sein’, where both sides take the nominative case, but you can get the accusative case with verbs indicating motion into the shoe, for example ‘Wie kam der Stein in meinen Schuh?’ = “How did the rock get into my shoe?”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yadwinder_gadari

Why "meinem" and not "mein" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Dative case after in referring to location.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindsayGaff

Is it possible to reverse the subject and the object here? Eg "da in meinem schuh sind eine Stein"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Without da, yes: In meinem Schuh ist ein Stein. or In meinem Schuh gibt es einen Stein.

(Note that es gibt keeps the es when you put the location first, but es ist does not.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-rolf-

Why is "meinem" necessary? It is after all understood that it is not someone else's shoe. How could I know if you have a stone in your shoe? Therefore "Es ist ein Stein im Schuh" should work, nicht wahr?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

It could be in someone else's shoe that I'm examining. However, instead of the explicit possessive ‘meinem’, one can use a paraphrastic possessive, as in „Ich habe einen Stein im Schuh.“, or „Bei mir ist ein Stein im Schuh.“.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tommylockwood

"Da ist ein Stein in deinem Schuh" is perfectly valid. Also, you wouldn't say "I have a rock in shoe."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HIDp4ACH

Why not "Da ist in meinem Schuh ein Stein."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The subject (here: ein Stein) is generally right after the verb if it is not before the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HIDp4ACH

Ah yes. I see now that I mistakenly thought "meinem Schuh" to be an indirect object because of the dative pronoun "meinem", when the dative was only triggered by the preposition "in". I was remembering the typical sentence structure of subject-verb-indirect object-direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheDreadfulGuy

''Es gibt ein Stein in meinem Schuh'' is not accepted. 18/10/2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

''Es gibt ein Stein in meinem Schuh'' is not accepted.

That's right.

Stein is masculine, not neuter, and so in the accusative case (as the direct object of the verb geben), you need masculine accusative einen before it.

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